Showing posts with label J. R. Monterose. Show all posts
Showing posts with label J. R. Monterose. Show all posts

Thursday, September 19, 2013

Ralph Sharon Sextet - Mr. And Mrs. Jazz

Mr & Mrs Jazz – and their cool cousins too – given that the combo also features some sublime tenor sax from JR Monterose, in addition to vocals from Sue and piano from Ralph! The set's a much harder-edged date than you might guess from the cover – and Sharon's approach to arrangements is a bit more dynamic than later work with Tony Bennett – swinging in a cool Bethlehem way, but given a great punch from the instrumentation – which also includes vibes from Eddie Costa and guitar from Joe Puma ! Sue Sharon's a pretty nice singer, and appears on about half the tracks – the others are instrumentals...

Source : http://www.dustygroove.com/item/652054/Sue+%26+Ralph+Sharon:Mr+%26+Mrs+Jazz

Ralph Sharon Sextet
With
Sue Ryan
Mr. And Mrs. Jazz

Tracks

1 It Don't Mean A Thing (Ellington, Mills)  4:12
2 A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues (Marks, Charles)  5:36
3 A Fine Romance (Kern, Fields)  3:05
4 Huguette Waltz (Friml, Hooker)  2:11
5 I Could Have Told You (Sigman, Williams)  4:23
6 A Trout, No Doubt (Sharon)  3:14
7 Mynah Lament (Sharon)  5:59
8 With The Wind And The Rain In Your Hair (Lawrence, Edwards)  2:58
9 Just You, Just Me (Greer, Klages)  5:08
10 Nothing At All (Frigo)  4:46
11 That Goldblatt Magic (Sharon)  4:44

*

Personnel
J.R. Monterose - ts
Eddie Costa - vb
Ralph Sharon - p
Joe Puma - g
Milt Hinton - b
Jo Jones - dr
Sue Ryan - vc [# 2, 4, 6, 8 & 10]

Recorded in New York City ; November, 1956

See also
http://www.jazzdisco.org/ralph-sharon/discography/

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

The Prestidigitator

Sicilian-born pianist "George Wallington" (his given name was Giacinto Figlia) had more than ethnicity in common with Dodo Marmarosa. Both men were active in the burgeoning bop scene of the early and mid-'40s, both made important contributions to the evolution of modern jazz, and both withdrew from public activity for protracted periods of time. Most importantly, both of these excellent pianists left enough great music in their wake to warrant a reappraisal of their legacies. Wallington named Mel Powell, Al Haig, and Bud Powell as his favorite contemporaries; primary influences were Art Tatum, Count Basie, and especially Earl Hines. He collaborated and consulted with Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Oscar Pettiford, and Max Roach during bop's formative years; later he would befriend young Mose Allison and help him to get established as both recording artist and jazz essayist. Recorded in early April 1957 and released on the East West label the following year, Wallington's album The Prestidigitator is an excellent example of his creative approach to the art of jazz. His quintet/quartet on this album consisted of bassist Teddy Kotick, drummer Nick Stabulas, Detroit-born tenor saxophonist J.R. Monterose, and bass trumpeter Jerry Lloyd, who sounds for all the world like a valve trombonist. Three of the seven pieces were composed by Mose Allison, two by Monterose, one by Lloyd, and only one -- the quirkily titled "Composin' at the Composer" -- by Wallington himself. This was the first time that anyone besides Mose Allison recorded Mose Allison's original compositions. Even Allison hadn't yet recorded "Rural Route" when Wallington worked it into this pleasantly bop-based album of early modern jazz. Allison's "Promised Land" is particularly soulful and straight-ahead. Stylistically, this stuff lands somewhere amongst Art Blakey's early Jazz Messengers, Hank Mobley, Sonny Stitt, Johnny Griffin, and some of that mid-'50s Mingus with John LaPorta. That means it's really good and maybe you ought to check it out. For those who are squinting at a digitally condensed thumbnail reproduction of the album cover and trying to decipher what's going on, it depicts a magician (or prestidigitator) as seen from upstage rather than from the audience's point of view. As he prepares to pull a rabbit out of his inverted hat, the animal is clearly visible inside of a wooden box on a collapsible stand, held in readiness by a child or midget concealed within.
arwulf arwulf

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/the-prestidigitator-r149691/review

George Wallington
Quintet
The Prestidigitator

Tracks

1 In Salah (Allison)  4:59
2 Composin' at the Composer (Wallington)  5:46
3 Jouons (Monterose)  6:01
4 Rural Route (Allison)  4:30
5 Promised Land (Allison)   5:43
6 August Moon (Lloyd)  4:53
7 Prestidigitator (Monterose)   6:35

Personnel
[# 1, 3 & 7]
George Wallington - p
J. R. Monterose - ts
Teddy Kotick - b
Nick Stabulas - dr
[# 2, 4 & 5]
Same as above, except
Jerry Lloyd - b tp is added
J. R. Monterose does not play on # 6

Recorded April 4 & 6, 1957

Saturday, June 8, 2013

J.R. Monterose

J.R. Monterose's first session as a leader was a thoroughly enjoyable set of swinging, straight-ahead bop that revealed him as a saxophonist with a knack for powerful, robust leads in the vein of Sonny Rollins and Coleman Hawkins. With a stellar supporting group of pianist Horace Silver, trumpeter Ira Sullivan, bassist Wilbur Ware, and drummer "Philly" Joe Jones, Monterose has recorded a set of bop that swings at a measured pace and offers many delightful moments. Throughout the session, Monterose sounds vigorous, whether he's delivering hard-swinging solos or waxing lyrical. With his bluesy vamps and soulful solos, Silver is equally impressive, while Sullivan's spotlights are alternately punchy and skilled ; similarly, the rhythm section is tight, letting the music breathe while keeping the groove. In fact, the quality of the music is so strong, J.R. Monterose qualifies as one of the underappreciated gems in Blue Note's mid-'50s catalog.
Stephen Thomas Erlewine


Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/jr-monterose-mw0000263590

J.R. Monterose
J.R. Monterose

Tracks

1 Wee-Jay (Monterose)  6:56
2 The Third (Bird)  5:15
3 Bobbie Pin (Monterose)  8:03
4 Marc V (Monterose)  6:30
5 Ka-Link (Jones)  9:01
6 Beauteous (Chambers)  5:24

Personnel
Ira Sullivan - tp
J.R. Monterose - ts
Horace Silver - p
Wilbur Ware - b
Philly Joe Jones - dr

Recorded at the Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey ; October 21, 1956

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

From Hollywood to New York with Jon Eardley

Trumpeter Jon Eardley's first two sessions as a leader (he would only lead two others during the next 20 years) are combined on this reissue CD. A fine boppish player who mostly stuck to the middle register of his horn, Eardley would soon be joining Gerry Mulligan's group. He is heard on four selections heading a quartet with pianist Pete Jolly (who was just starting his career), bassist Red Mitchell, and drummer Larry Bunker, and on four other numbers with tenor saxophonist J.R. Monterose, pianist George Syran, bassist Teddy Kotick, and drummer Nick Stabulas. The music (five originals and three standards) is essentially cool-toned bop and was quite modern for the period.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/from-hollywood-to-new-york-r137953

Jon Eardley
From Hollywood to New York

Tracks

1 Late Leader (Eardley) 4:57
2 Indian Spring (Eardley) 5:25
3 Black (Eardley) 4:05
4 Gloss (Eardley) 4:36
5 Hey There (Adler, Ross) 5:50
6 Demanton (Eardley) 4:35
7 Sid's Delight (Dameron) 4:17
8 If You Could See Me Now (Dameron) 6:23


Personnel
[# 1-4]
Jon Eardley - tp
Pete Jolly (aka Pete Cera) - p
Red Mitchell - b
Larry Bunker - dr
Recorded in Los Angeles ; December 25, 1954
[# 5-8]
Jon Eardley - tp
J. R. Monterose - ts
George Syran - p
Teddy Kotick - b
Nick Stabulas - dr
Recorded in Hackensack, New Jersey ; March 14, 1955

Friday, March 22, 2013

Teddy Charles Nonet & Tentet

Teddy Charles is a true rarity: a jazz musician who largely retired from the business. A skillful if not overly distinctive vibraphonist and (early in his career) quite capable on piano and drums, Charles was as important for his open-minded approach in the 1950s toward more advanced sounds as he was for his playing. He moved to New York to study percussion at Juilliard in 1946, but instead became involved in the jazz world. He had short stints with the big bands of Randy Brooks, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Buddy DeFranco, and Chubby Jackson from 1948-1951 and then played with combos headed by Anita O'Day, Oscar Pettiford, Roy Eldridge, and Slim Gaillard. He also became a member of the Jazz Composers' Workshop (1953-1955) along with Charles Mingus and Teo Macero, opening his style up to the influences of classical music and freer improvising. Charles, who recorded with Mingus, Miles Davis, and Wardell Gray, among many others, began leading his own stimulating record dates in 1951, and by 1953 he was also working as a record producer, a field that took much more of his time from 1956 on. He led his own sessions for Prestige, Atlantic, Savoy, Jubilee, Bethlehem (where he produced around 40 records, mostly for other artists), and Warwick from 1951-1960, but was hardly heard from in the 1960s, other than a 1963 set for United Artists. Charles relocated to the Caribbean, where he opened a sailing business. After participating in a 1980 jam session, he eventually moved back to New York, making a "comeback" record for Soul Note in 1988, but still remaining semi-retired from music.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/artist/teddy-charles-p6266/biography

The
Teddy Charles
Nonet & Tentet
[Complete Recordings]

Tracks

1 Vibrations (Waldron) 6:18
2 The Quiet Time (Giuffre) 5:55
3 The Emperor (Charles) 8:10
4 Nature Boy (Ahbez) 6:26
5 Green Blues (Charles) 4:11
6 You Go To My Head (Coots, Gillespie) 4:30
7 Lydian M-1 (Russell) 4:29
8 Word From Bird (Charles) 10:09
9 Show Time (Brookmeyer) 6:06
10 Sheherazade Blue (Rimsky-Korsakov) 3:48
11 Love For Three Oranges March (Prokofiev) 2:20
12 Borodin Bossa Nova (Borodin) 3:38
13 Dance Arabe (Tchaikovsky) 2:48
14 Lullaby Russe (Khachaturian) 4:25
15 Etude (Prokofiev) 3:13


Personnel
[# 2, 4 & 6]
Teddy Charles - vb
Art Farmer - tp
Gigi Gryce - as
J. R. Monterose - ts
George Barrow - bs
Don Butterfield - tub
Mal Waldron - p
Jimmy Raney - g
Teddy Kotick - b
Joe Harris - dr
Recorded 1956
[# 1, 3 & 7]
Same as above except Sol Schlinger - bs replaces Barrow Recorded January 17, 1956
[# 8-9]
Teddy Charles - vb
Art Farmer - tp
Eddie Bert - tb [# 8 only]
Jimmy Buffington - frhrn
[# 8 only]
Don Butterfield - tub
Hal Stein - as
Robert Newman - ts
George Barrow - bs
Hall Overton - p
Jimmy Raney - g
Addison Farmer - b
Ed Shaughnessy - dr
Recorded New York ; October 23, 1956
[# 10-12]
Teddy Charles - vb
Jerome Richardson - fl & ts
Zoot Sims - ts
Eric Dolphy - b cl
Pepper Adams - bs
Hall Overton - p
Jimmy Raney - g
Teddy Kotick - b
Osie Johnson - dr
Recorded New York ; April 23 or 26, 1963
[# 13-15]
Teddy Charles - vb
Jerome Richardson - fl & ts
Jimmy Giuffre - cl & ts
Tommy Newsom - b cl
Pepper Adams - bs
Hank Jones - p
Jim Hall - g
Teddy Kotick - b
Osie Johnson - dr
Recorded New York ; May 6, 1963

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Teddy Charles Evolution

Although somewhat overlooked in the jazz history books, vibraphonist Teddy Charles was for a period an important participant in the early Third Stream movement, using aspects of classical music to revitalize West Coast-style jazz. This CD reissue features trumpeter Shorty Rogers, tenor saxophonist Jimmy Giuffre, bassist Curtis Counce and drummer Shelly Manne on a couple of advanced originals (one apiece by Giuffre and Rogers) from 1953. After moving to New York, Charles teamed up for a short time with bassist Charles Mingus, performing six other numbers in a quartet with tenor saxophonist J.R. Monterose and drummer Gerry Segal. This session alternates cookers with sensitive ballads and is one of the better recorded showcases for Charles' vibes. Recommended.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/evolution-mw0000654632

Teddy Charles
Evolution

Tracks

1 Violetta (Nielson)  3:37
2 The Night we Called it a Day (Dennis, Adair)  2:41
3 Jay Walkin' (Monterose)  3:36
4 Speak Low (Waill, Nash)  3:16
5 Relaxo Abstracto (Charles)  5:23
6 I Can't Gzt Started (Duke, Gershwin)  7:10
7 Free (Rogers)  4:18
8 Evolution (Giuffre)  4:13

Personnel
[# 1-6] TEDDY CHARLES NEW DIRECTIONS QUARTET

Teddy Charles - vb
J. R. Monterose - ts
Charles Mingus - b
Gerry Segal - dr
Recorded in Hackensack, New Jersey ; January 6, 1955
[# 7-8]
TEDDY CHARLES QUINTET

Teddy Charles - vb
Shorty Rogers - tp
Jimmy Giuffre - ts
Curtis Counce - b
Shelly Manne - dr
Recorded in California ; August 31, 1953

Friday, February 1, 2013

J. R. Monterose - Jaywalkin'

"This is an illuminating series of three different sessions from the mid-'50s, where J.R. Monterose surrounds himself with crack players: Charles Mingus, Doug Watkins, Kenny Clarke, Jo Jones, Teddy Charles, Eddie Costa, Joe Puma, Ralph Sharon, and others. The sets are all groovin'-high treatments of everything from hard bop tunes of the era to an set of mostly Rodgers & Hart tunes completely turned upside down lyrically, harmonically, and rhythmically. Mingus, Clarke, Puma, Charles, and Sharon were the band for these cuts. While it begins with a Sharon original, it quickly moves into something wholly different. Mingus is waxing elegant here, invoking the Duke Ellington dictum of transforming everything into something else that's newer and brighter. On "Have You Met Miss Jones," Monterose gives the bassist the nod and he strolls out the melody, accenting it differently on every fourth beat; the saxophonist fills the middles with ostinato and Charles dances around the perimeter of Sharon and Clarke. On Gershwin's "Love Walked In," Sharon and Charles lead the front line, sweeping through the changes at a brisk but not bop pace for the entire melody before Charles solos his ass off on the chorus. Next it's Puma and Sharon, before Mingus and Monterose wax sweetly and loosely with the melody, stretching it to the breaking point before the vibes and piano come in to the rescue — brilliant. The entire record is virtually spotless and the production job is top-notch. This is a welcome and necessary document in Monterose's discography."
Thom Jurek, All Music Guide

Source : http://www.freshsoundrecords.com/record.php?record_id=1904

J. R. Monterose
Jaywalkin'

Tracks

1. Jaywalkin' (Monterose) 4:40
2. Spice (Legge) 2:41
3. Bradley's Beans (Legge) 3:20
4. Sugar Hips (Legge) 3:25
5. Brainwasher (Sunkel) 2:45
6. My Old Flame (Johnston, Coslow) 4:53
7. Mood For Mitch (Sharon) 5:17
8. Manhattan (Rodgers, Hart) 3:08
9. Plutocrat At The Automat (Sharon) 3:03
10. Have You Met Miss Jones ? (Rodgers, Hart) 3:18
11. Man On The Couch (Sharon) 3:18
12. There's A Small Hotel (Rodgers, Hart) 3:14
13. Love Walked In (Gershwin) 2:45
14. Darn That Dream (VanHeusen, DeLange) 3:21
15. Slightly Oliver (Sharon) 3:09
16. It Don't Mean A Thing (Ellington, Mills) 3:21
17. A Fine Romance (Kern, Fields) 3:01
18. Mynah lament (Sharon) 5:53
19. That Goldblatt Magi (Sharon) 4:39

Personnel
[#1-6]
JR Montrose - ts
Phil Sunkel - tp
Wade Legge - p
Doug Watkins - b
Bill Bradley - dr
Recorded in New York ; 1955
[#8-15]
JR Monterose - ts
Ralph Sharon - p
Teddy Charles - vb
Joe Puma - g
Charles Mingus - b
Kenny Clarke - dr
Recorded in New York ; 1955
[#16-19]
JR Monterose - ts
Ralph Sharon - p
Eddie Costa - vb
Joe Puma - g
Milt Hinton - b
Joe Jones - dr
Recorded in New York ; 1956

Thursday, January 31, 2013

René Thomas - Guitar Groove

European guitarist Rene Thomas made his debut as a leader with this 1960 date for the Jazzland label. Residing in Quebec at the time, Thomas is joined by an American cast of characters on Guitar Groove. In the bass chair is Teddy Kotick, one-time member of the Horace Silver and Bill Evans groups. Tenor saxophonist J.R. Monterose joins the quintet, fresh from the dates for his own The Message. Albert “Tootie” Heath, then in between stints with J.J. Johnson and the Jazztet, lends his drum work, and Hod O’Brien fills in the gaps on piano. These are session musicians of the highest order: skilled improvisers who always know when to make concessions to a group setting. In addition to the three original numbers on hand, the quintet dips into the book of jazz standards, rendering Burke and VanHeusen’s “Like Someone in Love,” Gershwin’s “How Long Has This Been Going On ?”, Thelonious Monk’s “Ruby, My Dear,” and Miles Davis’ “Milestones.” At times the players are almost too polite, though the spark provided by Heath’s snare punctuation and vibrant fills generally keep the band on the ball. “Thomas” himself is in fine, refined form, his sound an exquisitely enunciated flow of cool tones. He reserves “How Long” for himself, stretching out over six minutes, accompanied only by Heath’s brushwork and Kotick’s reserved bass playing. Though he’s made substantial contributions to dates with Chet Baker, Sonny Rollins, Stan Getz, and others, Guitar Groove is arguably Thomas’ strongest date as leader.
Nathan Bush

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/guitar-groove-mw0000094123

René Thomas
Guitar Groove

Tracks

1. Spontaneous Effort* (Monterose) 5’18
2. Ruby My Dear* (Monk) 4’46
3. Like Someone In Love** (Burke-Van Heusen) 5’50
4. MTC* (Monterose) 4’22
5. Milestones* (Davis) 5’47
6. How Long Has This Been Going On*** (Gershwin) 5’57
7. Green Street Scene* (Monterose) 7’35

*



Personnel
[# 1, 2, 4, 5 & 7] RENE THOMAS QUINTET
René Thomas - g
J.R. Monterose - ts
Hod O’brien - p
Teddy Kotick - b
Albert Heath - dr
[# 3] RENE THOMAS QUARTET
René Thomas - g
Hod O’brien - p
Teddy Kotick - b
Albert Heath - dr
[# 6] RENE THOMAS TRIO
René Thomas - g
Teddy Kotick - b
Albert Heath - dr

Recorded at Nola Penthouse studios, New York City, USA ; September 7 & 8, 1960

Thursday, July 12, 2012

Eddie Bert - Encore

Trombonist Eddie Bert has had a long and honorable musical career but relatively few opportunities to record as a leader. He is heard in two different settings on this CD reissue; with a pianoless quartet that includes guitarist Joe Puma and with a quintet that includes pianist Hank Jones and the complementary tenor of J.R. Monterose. The repertoire is comprised entirely of originals by either Bert or Puma but the style is very much of the era: cool-toned and lightly swinging bop. Despite the extreme brevity of this CD (under 35 minutes), the music is worth exploring.
Scott Yanow
Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/encore-mw0000623497

 Eddie Bert
Encore

Tracks

1 Bert Tram (Bert) 3:05
2 One for Tubby (Puma) 5:25
3 It's Only Sunshine (Puma) 3:12
4 Opicana (Puma) 3:23
5 Conversation (Bert) 6:45
6 Crosstown (Bert) 7:15
7 Manhattan Suite (Bert) 5:43

Personnel
[# 1-4]

Eddie Bert - tb
Joe Puma - g
Clyde Lombardi - b
Kenny Clarke - dr
Recorded in Hackensack, New Jersey ; June 22, 1955
[# 5-7]

Eddie Bert - tb
JR. Monterose - ts
Hank Jones - p
Clyde Lombardi - b
Kenny Clarke - dr
Recorded in Hackensack, New Jersey ; September 1, 1955

Friday, March 25, 2011

J. R. Monterose - The Message

Frank Anthony Monterose Jr. ("J.R." is simply a corruption of the Junior) is a native of Detroit, where he was born in 1927. He is not, however, a Detroiter by any other token than the accident of birth, for before he was old enough to talk, let alone blow a horn, he was transplanted by his family to Utica, N.Y., which has been home base ever since.
J.R.'s musical studies were centered mainly on the clarinet; he had very little formal saxophone training. The first great influences were Coleman Hawkins and the late Chu Berry; but "the real inspiration that decided me to take up tenor seriously rather than clarinet or alto was, believe it or not, Tex Beneke."
J.R. was still in his early teens when his extra-scholastic musical experiences began to broaden, all the way from the Utica Junior Symphony to a nearby strip joint. Meanwhile he was learning a few things about modern harmony. "Most of my influences in learning chord changes were piano players. I dig pure harmonies; I'm for the Bud Powell school. Sam Mancuso, a guitarist and pianist with a real natural talent helped me find the way."
After working with various territory bands in 1948 and '49, J.R. caught his first taste of the big time, in a somewhat distilled form, when he was invited to tour with an orchestra led by the late Henry "Hot Lips" Busse in 1950. "There was some good young fellows in the band," he recalls, "and once in a while there was an opportunity for a few solo bars." But after a long tour that wound up in California he felt sated with enough shuffle rhythm to last him for the rest of his life.
Back home, he worked locally around Utica and Syracuse through most of 1951 before spending six months with Buddy Rich--"That was when Buddy had a big band, with Davey Schildkraut, Allen Eager, and Philly Joe Jones playing second drums. But you just don't get enough blowing to do in a big band. After six months I was drugged with my own playing, and I went back home and spent the next couple of years working in little joints but with good men."
The next opportunity to display himself came in the Claude Thornhill band. Again, there were distinguished colleagues, among them Gene Quill and Dick Sherman, but again there was the frustration of big band limitations, and after a couple of months he decided he couldn't make it. Next came a steady gig for a solid year at the Nut Club in Greenwich Village with Nick Stabulas, under a liberal arrangement that allowed him to send subs in anytime he liked. This offered him chances for gigs with such intrepid modern jazzmen as Teddy Charles and Charles Mingus. "I learned something from those associations; I didn't go about it the same way they did, from studying; I got it all from listeneing, but I guess I was doing what they wanted and they seemed to dig it."
LEONARD FEATHER, from the liner notes, J.R. Monterose, Blue Note
Source : http://hardbop.tripod.com/monterose.html

J. R. Monterose
The Message

Tracks

1. Straight Ahead (Monterose) 5:30
2. Violets For Your Furs (Dennis, Adair) 2:47
3. Green Street Scene (Monterose) 6:18
4. Chafic (Monterose) 5:14
5. You Know That (Monterose) 5:44
6. I Remember Clifford (Golson) 5:38
7. Short Bridge (Monterose) 6:36

Personnel
J. R. Monterose - ts
Tommy Flanagan - p
Jimmy Garrison - b
Pete La Roca - dr

Recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey ; November 24, 1959

See also
http://www.jazzdiscography.com/Artists/Monterose/jrm-disc.htm

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Jon Eardley

Trumpeter Jon Eardley's first two sessions as a leader (he would only lead two others during the next 20 years) are combined on this reissue CD. A fine boppish player who mostly stuck to the middle register of his horn, Eardley would soon be joining Gerry Mulligan's group. He is heard on four selections heading a quartet with pianist Pete Jolly (who was just starting his career), bassist Red Mitchell, and drummer Larry Bunker, and on four other numbers with tenor saxophonist J.R. Monterose, pianist George Syran, bassist Teddy Kotick, and drummer Nick Stabulas. The music (five originals and three standards) is essentially cool-toned bop and was quite modern for the period.
Scott Yanow
Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/from-hollywood-to-new-york-r137953

Jon Eardley
From Hollywood to New York

Tracks

1 Late Leader (Eardley) 4:57
2 Indian Spring (Eardley) 5:25
3 Black (Eardley) 4:05
4 Gloss (Eardley) 4:36
5 Hey There (Adler, Ross) 5:50
6 Demanton (Eardley) 4:35
7 Sid's Delight (Dameron) 4:17
8 If You Could See Me Now (Dameron) 6:23


Personnel
[# 1-4]
Jon Eardley - tp
Pete Jolly (aka Pete Cera) - p
Red Mitchell - b
Larry Bunker - dr
Recorded in Los Angeles ; December 25, 1954
[# 5-8]
Jon Eardley - tp
J. R. Monterose - ts
George Syran - p
Teddy Kotick - b
Nick Stabulas - dr
Recorded in Hackensack, New Jersey ; March 14, 1955

Tuesday, December 9, 2008

Kenny Dorham

During the spring and summer of 1956, trumpeter Kenny Dorham recorded two studio albums with his Jazz Prophets, a small hard bop band involving tenor saxophonist J.R. Monterose and a rhythm section of pianist Dick Katz, bassist Sam Jones and drummer Arthur Edgehill. On May 31 of that year, Dorham's group performed live at the Café Bohemia with Bobby Timmons at the piano and guitarist Kenny Burrell sitting in on all but the first of four sets. Originally engineered by Rudy Van Gelder and remastered by him in 2001, Blue Note's 2002 double-disc "Complete" Dorham Café Bohemia edition combines every usable track taped during this exceptionally fine evening of live jazz. The word "understated" has sometimes been used to describe the music played by Dorham's band on this night in 1956; this is only appropriate if Dorham is compared with intense individuals like Fats Navarro or Dizzy Gillespie. Dorham's jazz was perhaps more intimate and accessible precisely because his horn had an earthier tone, almost like that of a cornet. Sometimes compared with Ted Curson, Richard Williams or Freddie Hubbard, Dorham sounded a lot like the profoundly gifted and vastly underappreciated Johnny Coles, particularly during ballads like "Autumn in New York" and "Round Midnight." There are also intimations of Miles Davis, Nat Adderley and even young Don Cherry. This music is designed for relaxing and grooving out. It will greatly assist anyone who is traveling by night or trying to make it through to the end of another day.
arwulf arwulf

Kenny Dorham
'Round About Midnight
(Live at the Cafe Bohemia, complete)

Tracks

Cd1
1 K.D.'s Blues [alternate take] (Dorham) 10:41
2 Autumn in New York (Duke) 4:38
3 Monaco [alternate take] (Dorham) 5:33
4 N.Y. Theme (Dorham) 5:39
5 K.D.'s Blues (Dorham) 9:30
6 Hill's Edge (Dorham) 8:16
7 A Night in Tunisia (Gillespie, Paparelli) 9:31
8 Who Cares ? [alternate take] (Gershwin, Gershwin) 4:59
9 Royal Roost (Clarke, Dorham) 8:41

Cd2
1 Mexico City (Dorham) 6:02
2 'Round About Midnight (Hanighen, Monk, Williams) 7:44
3 Monaco (Dorham) 6:37
4 Who Cares ? (Gershwin, Gershwin) 6:21
5 My Heart Stood Still (Hart, Rodgers) 7:49
6 Riffin' (Dorham) 7:50
7 Mexico City [alternate take] (Dorham) 6:33
8 The Prophet (Dorham) 6:20
Personnel
Kenny Dorham - tp
J. R. Monterose - ts
Kenny Burrell - p
Bobby Timmons - p
Sam Jones - b
Arthur Edgehill - dr

Recorded live at the Café Bohemia in NYC on May 31, 1956.

Monday, November 17, 2008

Teddy Charles

Most of this CD features vibraphonist Teddy Charles heading an advanced tentet in 1956, a unit including the likes of trumpeter Art Farmer, altoist Gigi Gryce, tenor saxophonist J.R. Monterose, pianist Mal Waldron, and guitarist Jimmy Raney. The arrangements of George Russell ("Lydian M-1"), Gil Evans (a year before Miles Ahead), Jimmy Giuffre, Mal Waldron, and Charles are quite advanced but often leave room for some swinging spots. The final three selections on the CD are actually taken from a slightly later album. Of these, "Blue Greens" is a change of pace, a quartet outing for Charles, pianist Hall Overton, bassist Charles Mingus, and drummer Ed Shaughnessy. All in all, this CD is pretty definitive of Teddy Charles' more adventurous music of the 1950s and it grows in interest with each listening. [The 2001 reissue on Collectables strips away the three bonus tracks that were appended to the original album when first released on CD by Atlantic.]
Scott Yanow
Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:fcfoxqw0ld0e

Teddy Charles
Teddy Charles Tentet

Tracks

1 Vibrations (Waldron) 6:16
2 The Quiet Time (Giuffre) 5:52
3 The Emperor (Charles) 8:07
4 Nature Boy (Abhez, Charles) 6:24
5 Green Blues (Charles) 4:09
6 You Go to My Head (Coots, Gillespie) 4:27
7 Lydian M-1 (Russell) 4:25

Personnel
Teddy Charles - vhp
Peter Urban - tp
Gigi Gryce - as
J. R. Monterose - ts
George Barrow - bs
Don Butterfield - tb
Jimmy Raney - g
Mal Waldron - p
Teddy Kotick - b
Joe Harris - dr
(Sol Schlinger - bs, replaces George Barrow on 1, 3 & 7)