Showing posts with label Cecil Payne. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Cecil Payne. Show all posts

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Randy Weston Trio & Quintet (The Modern Art of Jazz)

Jazz and world-music pianist/composer Randy Weston boasts a range of musical influences. Born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, he later lived in Africa for many years, both playing and studying African music. The result of his lifelong work and his far-reaching adventures is a beautiful and balanced hybrid of classic American jazz and ancient African rhythms and tonalities.
Weston grew up in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn, where his father, the owner of a soul food diner, emphasized to his son, "You are an African born in America." The elder Weston laid down a strict rule for Randy : Practice the piano at home each day or feel the edge of a ruler on your knuckles. When the now six-foot-eight Weston was in his early teens he was already six-feet-two-inches tall and eager to play basketball, but his father ensured that he did not stray too far from his piano. Passing along his vast knowledge of calypso, jazz, and blues on to his son, Weston’s father frequently took him to see bandleader Duke Ellington at the Sonia Ballroom or Brooklyn Palace, as well as to Harlem to hear calypso. In addition, Weston’s mother, who was from Virginia, exposed her young son to spirituals.
While Weston was a youngster in Brooklyn in the 1930s and 1940s, musicians Miles Davis, Max Roach, and George Russell all lived in the borough at one time or another, and each had stopped into the elder Weston’s luncheonette for soul food. Weston felt steeped in the African American music community as a teenager; he especially made a point of seeing Coleman Hawkins perform whenever possible, and through Hawkins, was able to meet pianist Thelonious Monk. Weston spent many hours at home listening to Monk’s recordings.
At the age of 14, Weston was taught by drummer Al Harewood how to play a tune on the piano by ear ; Weston was then able to imitate current releases by Ellington, Hawkins, and Count Basie. Weston used to go to the Atlantic Avenue section of Brooklyn to hear Arabic musicians play the oud, a type of lute. He told Down Beat’s Fred Bouchard, "We were searching for new sounds. We’d get into quarter and eighth tones. But here was Monk doing it, with spirit power, with magic !… For me it was pure African piano." Besides Monk, Basie, Hawkins, and Ellington, jazz greats Nat King Cole and Art Tatum were also early influences for Weston.
Voted "new star pianist" in a 1955 Down Beat critics’ poll, Weston spent most of the 1950s playing in clubs around New York City with Cecil Payne and Kenny Dorham. He also toured colleges with historian Marshall Stearns, who lectured while Weston and a few other musicians performed African, calypso, Dixieland, and bebop music. Weston wrote a string of popular songs, including "Saucer Eyes," "Pam’s Waltz," "Little Niles," and his best-known tune, "Hi-Fly," which is about being six-foot-eight and looking at the ground. Among the 11 albums he released during the fifties were Cole Porter in a Modern Mood (1954), Randy Weston Trio (1955), Piano a La Mode (1957), and Little Niles (1958).

Source : http://www.answers.com/topic/randy-weston-1

Randy Weston
The Modern Art of Jazz

Tracks

1 Loose Wig (Weston) 3:01
2 Run Joe (Jordan, Merrick, Willoughby) 3:43
3 A Theme for Teddy (Weston) 5:41
4 In a Little Spanish Town (Lewis, Wayne, Young) 3:01
5 Don't Blame Me (Fields, McHugh) 5:18
6 J.K. Blues (Weston) 4:17
7 Well, You Needn't (Monk) 5:01
8 How High the Moon (Hamilton, Lewis) 4:49
9 Stormy Weather* (Arlen, Koehler) 5:08

* bonus track

Personnel
[# 2, 4, 6 & 7] Randy Weston Quintet
Randy Weston - p
Ray Copeland - tp
Cecil Payne - as & bs
Ahmed Abdul-Malik - b
Wilbert Hogan - dr
Recorded in New York City ; November 21, 1956
[# 1, 3, 5, 8 & 9] Randy Weston Trio
Randy Weston - p
Ahmed Abdul-Malik - b
Willie Jones - dr
Recorded in New York City ; November 22, 1956

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Sonny Stitt Plays Johnny Richards & Quincy Jones

This CD set contains two of Sonny Stitt’s earliest, most important albums. Backing his superb work on alto and tenor are bands conducted by two of the finest jazz arrangers: Johnny Richards, and Quincy Jones in one of his first — and best — efforts in the field.
On the two sessions from 1953, Richards provides interestingly harmonized ensemble colours, and though Stitt gets most of the solo space, Kai Winding, Don Elliott, and the rhythm section also deliver some of the set’s most memorable moments. The 1955 sessions are, if anything, even better. Quincy Jones’s writing is crystal clear ; clean, swinging, and beautifully constructed. Stitt is again the main soloist, playing alto — his best instrument — but there are significant contributions from Hank Jones, Oscar Pettiford, and Jimmy Nottingham throughout.
With the power of his playing, the irresistible impact of his emotion, and the implacable certainty of his beat, Stitt proved to be the best of all those who blew directly in the Parker idiom.

Source : http://www.freshsoundrecords.com/plays_arrangements_from_the_pen_of_johnny_richards_&_quincy_jones_2_lps_on_1_cd-cd-5505.html

Sonny Stitt
Plays Arrangements From The Pen
Of
Johnny Richards & Quincy Jones
(2 Lps On 1 Cd)

Tracks

1 Sancho Panza (Richards) 2 :57
2 Sweet and Lovely (Amheim, Daniels, obias) 2:58
3 If I Could Be with You (Johnson, Creamer) 2:21
4 Hooke’s Tours (Richards, Stitt) 2:50
5 Loose Walk (Stitt) 2:52
6 Pink Satin (Richards, Stitt) 2:57
7 Shine On Harvest Moon (Bayes, Norworth) 2:33
8 Opus 202 (Richards, Stitt) 2:46
9 My Funny Valentine (Rodgers, Hart) 3:27
10 Lover (Rodgers, Hart) 3:26
11 Sonny’s Bunny (Stitt) 3:59
12 Love Walked In (Gershwin) 4:04
13 If You Could See Me Now (Dameron, Sigman) 4:30
14 Quince (Stitt) 6:59
15 Come Rain or Come Shine (Arlen, Mercer) 4:20
16 Stardust (Carmichael, Parish) 3:10

*


Personnel
[# 1-4] from the original Roost 10" LP "Sonny Stitt Playing Arrangements From The Pen Of Johnny Richards" (RLP 415)
Sonny Stitt - ts
Don Elliott - melph
Kai Winding - tb
Sid Cooper - ts & pic
George Berg - bs
Horace Silver - p
Charles Mingus - b
Don Lamond dr
Johnny Richards - cond & arr
Recorded at Coastal Recording, New York City ; March 18, 1953.
[# 5-8] from the original Roost 10" LP "Sonny Stitt Playing Arrangements From The Pen Of Johnny Richards" (RLP 415)
Sonny Stitt - as
Don Elliott - melph
Kai Winding - tb
Jerry Sanfino - ts & piccolo
George Berg - bs
Al Williams - p
Charles Mingus - b
Jo Jones - d
Santos Miranda - cng
Johnny Richards - cond & arr
Recorded at Fulton Studios, New York City ; November 16, 1953.
[# 9-12] from the original Roost 12" LP "Sonny Stitt Plays Arrangements From The Pen Of Quincy Jones" (LP 2204)
Sonny Stitt - as
Jimmy Nottingham, Ernie Royal - tp
J.J. Johnson - tb
Anthony Ortega- fl & as
Seldon Powell - ts
Cecil Payne - bs
Hank Jones - p
Freddie Green - g
Oscar Pettiford - b
Jo Jones - d
Quincy Jones - cond & arr
Recorded in New York City ; September 30, 1955.
[# 13-16] from the original Roost 12" LP "Sonny Stitt Plays Arrangements From The Pen Of Quincy Jones" (LP 2204)
Sonny Stitt - as
Thad Jones, Joe Newman -tp
Jimmy Cleveland - tb
Anthony Ortega - fl & as
Seldon Powell - ts
Cecil Payne - bs)
Hank Jones - p
Freddie Green - g
Oscar Pettiford - b
Jo Jones - d
Quincy Jones - cond & arr
Recorded in New York City ; October 9, 1955

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Tadd Dameron & His Orchestra - Fontainebleau

Pianist-composer-arranger Tadd Dameron led relatively few sessions in his career, making the half-hour of music on this CD reissue quite valuable. Dameron performs five of his originals (best-known are the complex "Fontainebleau" and "The Scene Is Clean") with an octet comprised of trumpeter Kenny Dorham, trombonist Henry Coker, altoist Sahib Shihab, tenor saxophonist Joe Alexander, baritonist Cecil Payne, bassist John Simmons, drummer Shadow Wilson and the leader's sparse piano. As is usual with most Dameron dates, the emphasis is on his inventive arrangements although there is space (most notably on the 11-minute blues "Bula-Beige") for individual solos. Recommended.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/fontainebleau-mw0000649465

Tadd Dameron
&
His Orchestra
Fontainebleau

Tracks

1 Fontainebleau  4:48
2 Delirium  5:00
3 The Scene Is Clean 5 :00
4 Flossie Lou  4:50
5 Bula-Beige  11:20

All Compositions by Tadd Dameron

Personnel
Tadd Dameron - p
Henry Coker - tb
Kenny Dorham - tp
Cecil Payne - bs
Joe Alexander - ts
Sahib Shihab - as
John Simmons - b
Shadow Wilson - dr

Recorded in New York City ; March 9, 1956

Sunday, May 12, 2013

Complete Recordings of Jimmy Cleveland (1955-1959)

One of the finest trombonists to emerge during the 1950s, Jimmy Cleveland has been overlooked since moving to Los Angeles in the late '60s. He started on trombone when he was 16, and his first important job was with Lionel Hampton (1950-1953). After Hampton's European tour of 1953, Cleveland became a busy freelance musician in New York, making many recording sessions (including with Dizzy Gillespie, Gil Evans, Oliver Nelson, Oscar Pettiford, Lucky Thompson, James Moody, and Gerry Mulligan). He toured Europe with Quincy Jones in 1959-1960, and played with Thelonious Monk's 1967 octet, but otherwise stayed in New York until going to the West Coast to play with The Merv Griffin Show's band and to continue recording for Quincy Jones. Jimmy Cleveland remains one of the most technically skilled of the bop-based trombonists, and still appears on an irregular basis in Los Angeles
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/artist/jimmy-cleveland-p6293


Jimmy Cleveland
Complete Recordings
(1955-1959)

Tracks 

Cd. 1

1 I Hadn't Anyone 'Till You (Noble) 4:15
2 See Minor (Cleveland, Jones) 5:15
3 Love Is Here To Stay (Gershwin, Gershwin) 3:29
4 Hear Ye! Hear Ye ! (Cleveland, Jones) 5:49
5 You Don't Know What Love Is (DePaul, Raye) 4:49
6 Little Beaver (Cleveland, Jones) 7:45
7 My One and Only Love (Wood, Mellin) 4:02
8 Love Is Here To Stay (Gershwin, Gershwin) 3:32
9 Vixen (Feather) 4:28
10 Count 'Em (Jones) 6:36
11 Bone Brother (Cleveland, Jones) 5:38
12 Out Of This World (Arlen, Mercer) 4:03
13 All This and Heaven Too (DeLange, VanHeusen) 5:42
14 Goodbye Ebbets Field (Wilkins) 6:07
15 Posterity (Duncan) 4:45

Cd. 2

1 A Jaa Ballad (Wilkins) 4:06
2 Long Ago and Far Away (Robin, Rainger) 3:23
3 Jimmy's Tune (Cleveland) 3:35
4 Marie (Berlin) 4:46
5 Stardust (Carmichael, Parish) 4:53
6 The Best Things in Life are Free (DeSylva, Young, Henderson) 4:36
7 A Hundred Years from Today (Young, Young, Washington) 4:37
8 Jummy's Old Funky Blues (Wilkins) 8:44
9 Swing Low, Swwet Chariot (trad.) 5:13
10 Jay Bird (Johnson) 3:36
11 Our Delight (Dameron) 4:30
12 Crazy Rhythm (Meyer, Wolfe Kahn, Caesar) 3:53
13 Reminiscing (Gryce) 3:03
14 We Were Kissed (Liston) 3:46
15 Old Reliable (Pettiford) 4:13
16 Tricotism (Pettiford) 7:56
17 Tom-kattin' (Thompson) 3:33


Personnel  
[Cd. 1 - # 1-3]
Ernie Royal - tp
Jerome Richardson - ts

Cecil Payne - bs
Wade Legge - p
Barry Galbraith - g
Paul Chambers - b
Joe Harris - dr
Quincy Jones - arr.
Recorded in New York City ; August 4, 1955
[Cd. 1 - # 4-6]
Same as above except
Lucky Thompson - ts
John Williams - p
Max Roach - dr
Replace Richardson, Legge & Harris
Recorded in New York City ; August 12, 1955
[Cd. 1 - # 7-11]
Same as above, except
Hank Jones - p
Oscar Pettiford - b
Osie Johnson - dr
Replace Williams, Chambers & Roach
Recorded in New York City ; November 22, 1955
[Cd. 1 - # 12-14]
Art Farmer - tp
Jimmy Cleveland - tb
Don Butterfield - tub
Benny Golson - ts & arr. [# 13]
Wynton Kelly - p
Eddie Jones - b
Charlie Persip - dr
Ernie Wilkins - arr. [# 12, 14]
Recorded in New York City ; December 12, 1955
[Cd. 1 - # 15]
Same as above, except

Jay McAllister - tub
Replaces Don Butterfield ; Ernie Wilkins - arr.
Recorded in New York City ; December 13, 1955
[Cd. 2 - # 1-3]
Same personnel and date as above 
[Cd. 2 - # 4-5]
Ray Copeland - tp
Ernie Royal - flhrn
Jimmy Cleveland - tb
Don Butterfield - tu
Jerome Richardson - ts & fl
Junior Mance - p
Bill Crow - b
Art Taylor - dr
Ernie Wilkins - arr.
 
Recorded in New York City ; December 16, 1955
[Cd. 2 - # 6-10]
Same as above
Recorded in New York City ; December 17 [# 6-7] & 18 [# 8-10], 1958
[Cd. 2 - # 6-10]
Art Farmer - tpJimmy Cleveland - tb
Benny Golson - ts & arr. [#
11, 15-17]
Jerome Richardson - ts, fl & bs
Hank Jones - p
Milt Hinton - b
Osie Johnson - dr
Gigi Gryce - arr. [# 12-14]
 
Recorded in New York City ; February 1959

*

_________
“We have here an issue of extraordinary importance. The unearthing of Jimmy Cleveland’s music is not just an act of justice among so many forgotten jazz musicians. Cleveland has been more than that: he was the most important trombonist of modern jazz (after Jay Jay Johnson) and, a master in his own right. . . . On the original liner notes for one of Cleveland’s only four LPs as a leader, Dickie Wells stated that Jimmy was ‘one of the best youngsters to ever hold a trombone in his hands’. Wells’ opinion was noteworthy.”
Carlos Sampayo in the liner notes

Source : http://www.freshsoundrecords.com/complete__recordings__2_cd_set-cd-4370.html

Sunday, May 5, 2013

Clark Terry & Jimmy Hamilton (feat. Barry Galbraith)

With the exception of three songs cut as V-Discs in 1947, this set contains flugelhornist Clark Terry's first recordings as a leader. Joined by trombonist Jimmy Cleveland, baritonist Cecil Payne, pianist Horace Silver, Oscar Pettiford on cello, bassist Wendell Marshall, and drummer Art Blakey, Terry performs eight obscure songs that are arranged quite expertly by Quincy Jones. Terry sounds much more influenced by Dizzy Gillespie than he would in just a couple of years, but his good-humored musical personality and control of his horn were already obvious. With Pettiford offering occasional cello solos (in addition to playing second bass) and Cleveland in top form, this is an LP long overdue to be reissued on CD
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:3pfrxq8hldae

Clark Terry
Swahili
&
The New York Jazz Quintet

Tracks

1 Swahili (Jones) 6:07
2 Double Play (Jones) 3:33
3 Slow Boat (Henderson, Terry) 4:28
4 Co-Op (Terry) 3:45
5 Kitten (Terry) 5:35
6 The Countess (Green, Terry) 6:42
7 Tuma (Jones) 3:06
8 Chuckles (Terry) 4:19
9 Bohemia After Dark (Pettiford) 3:51
10 I Get a Kick out of You (Porter) 4:31
11 Blues in My Room (Hamilton) 6:11
12 I Can't Give You Anything But Love (Fields, McHugh) 4:38
13 Chuckles (Terry) 2:43
14 Blues for Clarinet (Hamilton) 4:00
15 Solitude (Ellington) 5:24
16 What Am I Here For (Ellington) 4:41



Personnel
[# 1-8]
Clark Terry - tp
Jimmy Cleveland - tb
Cecil Payne - bs
Horace Silver - p
Oscar Pettiford - cel & b [# 2, 4, 5, 7 & 8]
Wendell Marshall - b [# 1, 3 & 6]
Art Blakey - dr
Quincy Jones - arr
Recorded at Fine Studio Recording, New York City ; January 3 [# 1-4] & January 4 [# 5-8], 1955.
[# 9-16]
Clark Terry - tp
Jimmy Hamilton - cl
Barry Galbraith - g
Oscar Pettiford - b
Sidney Gross - rhth g
Osie Johnson - dr
Recorded in New York City ; December 1954.

Monday, April 29, 2013

Duke Jordan - Trio & Quintet

The title of this 1955 Savoy release by pianist Duke Jordan succinctly points to the set's merits and shortcomings. The five trio performances with Art Blakey (drums) and Percy Heath (bass) work well. The five tracks from the same group augmented by Cecil Payne (baritone sax) and Eddie Bert (trombone) don't come up to the mark. For the trio tracks, Jordan's elegant, swinging bop style is the main attraction, with Blakey and Heath providing appropriately understated support. "They Can't Take That Away From Me" and "Night in Tunisia" are each given fresh reworkings. Jordan's upbeat "Forecast" and his meditative ballad "Sultry Eve" are strong originals. George Gershwin's "Summertime," unfortunately, gets an undistinguished, overly literal reading. On the quintet tracks the focus wavers. Jordan is too often relegated to conventional comping in the background. Blakey's playing occasionally becomes cluttered and Heath seems to lose interest. More problematic is the ineffective, bottom-heavy baritone sax/trombone combination. Payne's and Bert's parts generate little harmonic interest. The result is two horns doing no more than the work of one. As for the tunes, the pianist's "Flight to Jordan" and Payne's "Cu-ba" offer respectable solos, while "Scotch Blues" is an awkward attempt by Jordan to fuse a Scottish folk dance theme with straight-ahead blues. The blues passages are fine, but the scotch doesn't mix. There are some good moments on this CD, particularly from Jordan and Payne. Both the pianist and the baritone saxophonist, however, can be heard to better advantage on Payne's 1956 set, Patterns of Jazz, where Jordan, with Tommy Potter (bass) and Art Taylor (drums), shines in a consistently integrated and cohesive performance with Payne.
Jim Todd
  
Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/trio-quintet-r181491/review

Duke Jordan
Trio & Quintet
 
Tracks

1 Forecast (Jordan) 4:50
2 Sultry Eve (Jordan) 3:56
3 They Can't Take That Away from Me (Gershwin, Gershwin) 4:34
4 A Night in Tunisia (Gillespie, Paparelli) 5:09
5 Summertime (Gershwin, Gershwin, Heyward) 4:24
6 Flight to Jordan (Jordan) 4:42
7 Two Lovers (Jordan) 3:07
8 Cu-Ba (Payne) 3:31
9 Yesterdays (Harbach, Kern) 5:45
10 Scotch Blues (Jordan) 4:33

 
Personnel
[# 1-5] Duke Jordan Trio 
Duke Jordan - p 
Percy Heath - b
 Art Blakey - dr
Recorded at the Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey ; October 10, 1955
[# 6-11] Duke Jordan Quintet 
Duke Jordan - p
Eddie Bert - tb
Cecil Payne - bs
Percy Heath - b
 Art Blakey - dr 
Recorded same place as above ; October 20, 1955

Sunday, March 31, 2013

Randy Weston à la Mode

Randy Weston, 31, is evolving into a vigorously personal jazzman with spirited intelligence, and large reservoir of what the young mainstreamers like Quincy Jones and Cannonball Adderley call soul.
Within the past year, Weston's career is also quickening. He's worked the Cafe Bohemia, several Sunday afternoon concerts at Birdland for Jazz Unlimited, Cy Coleman's Playroom, The Five Spot, and concerts at Town Hall and Loew's Sheridan presented by the Village Voice, the resiliently hip Greenwich Village weekly. He has also signed with the Columbia Lecture Bureau for the fall of 1957 and the spring of 1958 to present a series of jazz lecture-demonstrations at colleges and in auditoriums. Weston, as articulate verbally as he is on piano, usually opens his lecture program with demonstrations of the roots of jazz -African rhythms, spirituals, boogie-woogie and the blues. The second half reflects his own modern approach, and invariably includes several of his originals.
Randy has become a jazz writer of growing distinction. He's written some 23 originals, and several of them, like the waltz, Little Niles, are being recorded and performed by a number of his contemporaries, including Gigi Gryce, Oscar Pettiford and George Shearing. Milt Jackson plans to record Randy's Pam's Waltz, and I expect that in the decade and more ahead, Randy will become as recognized for his compositions as for his playing.
Randy's attitude toward jazz is strongly involved with his love and respect for the traditions of the language. One of his three major influences is Duke Ellington. "The way he plays," Randy begins, "for one thing. He's not recognized too much as a pianist, but he's a fine one. He's very definite; he's not afraid to do what's in his mind; and his playing has that sound and drive he gets from his orchestra. And there's his feeling for change of pace; he can be wild and then become so subtle. The blues feeling he had his band have moves me so. The whole band has that blues sound and feeling, no matter what they're playing."
Art Tatum is a second influence, as he has to have been to almost every jazz pianist by virtue of his total command of the instrument. A third is Thelonious Monk. "When I first met Monk," says Randy, "I was more interested in Nat Cole and Eddie Heywood, who lived around the corner from me. I wasn't in a musical position to appreciate what Monk was doing. This was in 1944, and I heard Monk at the Down Beat with Coleman Hawkins. I had great respect for Hawkins, and I figured that if Hawkins had hired Monk, Monk must have something to say. I became so fascinated by him in time that I decided to meet and talk to him. There wasn't much at first in the way of conversation, but I'd go by his house, starting around 1947 and continuing intermittently for several years, and he'd play piano and I'd listen for three or four years. I really do feel Monk is a genius."
"If it's not a paradox," Randy adds, "Monk has a command of freedom. I never get the feeling of paper and notes in his work. There is a complete freedom in his work. It doesn't sound as if he's affected by barriers or conventions. Whatever he feels, he writes and plays; and yet he still keeps alive that old definite piano sound like Fats Waller and James P. Johnson. Monk inspired me in that he showed me you can stretch out and be yourself. Some people say he hasn't much technique as a pianist. Technique isn't important. It's the message you have that counts, especially in jazz. I once heard a piano player who could only play three or four chords, but when he was through, you knew emotionally he'd been there!
"As a writer, Monk can create a melody that sounds like no one else's and yet just seems tom have flowed naturally from him. I can't verbalize how he does it; I don't think he can verbalize it either. I've never taken a formal lesson from him, but I've listened and talked to him a lot, and he's changed my whole conception. I remember one lesson he taught me especially well. There was some music going on at his house. I didn't care for it, and said so. Monk said nonchalantly but firmly, "You've got to listen to everybody and everything. Everybody has something to say." "I've found that to be very true."
Concerning the tracks on this album, Randy begins by explaining that his Earth Birth was written at Lenox, Massachusetts, where he has played during the summer, most recently at the Festival House, since 1951. "It's nature, my feeling about trees, grass, the open." The composition is in waltz tempo throughout, and is now the third of Randy's waltzes (the previous two, Pam's Waltz and Little Niles), were dedicated to his children who are respectively seven and six.
Randy's regular bassist, John A."Peck"Morrison, who has been with Gerry Mulligan, is on the date and Randy's assessment of him succinctly is that "he's steady, plays a basic bass, and swings practically all the time". The drummer is Connie Kay on one of his very few recent jazz dates away from the Modern Jazz Quartet, his regular home.
"Connie and I," says Randy, "played a lot of rhythm and blues together around 1957 with Bullmoose Jackson and Frank "Floor Show" Cully. We even made two southern tours together, and were on the first date the Clovers made for Atlantic. We weren't very happy when we came back from those tours. We were both playing pretty badly and loud, and we just couldn't express ourselves in the music. It was a constant hassle. So we stayed in jazz."
"Connie," concludes Weston, "is one of the most musical of all jazz drummers, and he's a wonderfully swinging drummer besides. I wonder if he gets a chance to be fully heard and appreciated with the Modern Jazz Quartet. He gets a beautiful sound from his set, beautiful colors. We took fours on the waltz, and listen to the musical things he plays."
Randy, in summary, though characteristically self-critical, feels he has expressed several parts of his message on this album, and as you can hear, it is a message that proves the worth of a creative individual knowing and feeling his past. If the essential individuality (or capacity for that kind of growth) exists in a player and writer, it can only be strengthened by a feeding on the roots of his language.
Nat Hentoff (1957)

Source : http://www.randyweston.info/randy-weston-discography-pages/1957pianoalamode.html

Randy Weston
Little Niles/Piano A-la-Mode

Tracks

1 Earth Birth (Weston) 2:52
2 Little Susan (Weston) 3:24
3 Nice Ice (Weston) 2:55
4 Little Niles (Weston) 6:00
5 Pam's Waltz (Weston) 3:15
6 Babe's Blues (Weston) 6:58
7 Let's Climb a Hill (Weston) 5:53
8 Earth Birth (Weston) 5:12
9 Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen (Traditional) 3:16
10 Saucer Eyes (Weston) 4:21
11 I Got Rhythm (Gershwin, Gershwin) 5:24
12 Gingerbread (Weston) 2:57
13 Cocktails for Two (Coslow, Johnston) 3:37
14 Honeysuckle Rose (Razaf, Waller) 6:30
15 Fe-Double-U-Blues (Weston) 5:38
16 Saucer Eyes* (Weston) 4:25


Personnel
[# 1-7] Little Niles (LP 1959 - United Artists UAL 4011 / UAS 5011)
Ray Copeland - tp
Melba Liston - tb
Johnny Griffin - ts
Randy Weston - pJamil Nasser - b
Charlie Persip - dr
Idrees Sulieman - tp replaces Copeland [#6]
Recorded in New York ; October, 1958
[# 8-15] Piano A-la-Mode (LP 1959 - Jubilee 1060)
Randy Weston - p
Peck Morrison - b
Connie Kay - dr
Recorded at the Beltone Studios, New York ; Spring 1957
[# 15]
Cecil Payne - bs
Randy Weston - p
Ron Carter - b
Roy Haynes - dr
Recorded in New York City ; June 4, 1960.
“Saucer Eyes” was first issued on The Roulette Jazz CD Sampler (Roulette B2-97772)

Monday, February 18, 2013

Jazz by Matthew Gee !

Trombonist Matthew Gee was primarily a section player and a valuable sideman, but as this CD reissue shows, he could have been a significant soloist too. The two sessions (Gee's only two as a leader) feature him in an unusual quintet with altoist Ernie Henry (the trombone-alto blend has a unique sound) and at the head of a septet also including trumpeter Kenny Dorham, tenorman Frank Foster, and baritonist Cecil Payne. The music is quite bop-oriented and mixes together standards with three swinging Gee originals. An underrated and generally overlooked gem by a forgotten trombonist.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/jazz-by-gee-r139163

Matthew Gee
Jazz by Gee

Tracks

1 Out of Nowhere (Green, Heyman) 3:24
2 I'll Remember April (DePaul, Johnston, Raye) 4:16
3 Joram (Massey) 3:04
4 Sweet Georgia Brown (Bernie, Casey, Pinkard) 2:58
5 Gee ! (Gee) 5:00
6 Lover Man (Davis, Ramirez, Sherman) 6:11
7 Kingston Lounge (Gee) 8:45
8 The Boys from Brooklyn (Gee) 7:54

Personnel
[# 1-5] THE QUINTET
Matthew Gee - tb
Ernie Henry - as
Joe Knight - p
Wilbur Ware - b
Arthur Taylor - dr
Recorded at Reeves Studios, New York City ; August 22, 1956
[# 6-8] THE SEPTET
Kenny Dorham - tp
Matthew Gee - tb
Frank Foster - ts
Cecil Payne - bs
Joe Knight - p
John Simmons - b
Arthur Taylor - dr
Recorded at Reeves Studios, New York City ; July 19, 1956

Saturday, February 16, 2013

Randy Weston à la Bohemia

Randy Weston, who was more under Thelonious Monk's influence back in 1956 then he would be in the near future, is in top form during this live set. His quartet features the rarely heard but talented baritonist Cecil Payne, bassist Ahmed Abdul-Malik and drummer Al Dreares. Highpoints of the straightahead set (which has been reissued on CD) include the calypso "Hold 'Em Joe" (recorded almost a decade before Sonny Rollins), "It's All Right with Me" (one of two trio tracks) and the lone Weston original on the date, the stimulating "Chessman's Delight."
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/jazz--la-bohemia-r150071

Randy Weston
Jazz á la Bohemia

Tracks

1 Theme: Solemn Meditation (Gill) 0:45
2 Just a Riff (Catlett) 9:50
3 You Go to My Head (Coots, Gillespie) 6:10
4 Once in a While (Edwards, Green) 6:26
5 Hold 'Em Joe (Traditional) 7:24
6 It's All Right With Me (Porter) 3:48
7 Chessman's Delight (Weston) 9:26
8 Theme: Solemn Meditation (Gill) 1:24

Personnel
Randy Weston - p
Cecil Payne - bs
Ahmed Abdul-Malik - b
Al Dreares - dr

Recorded at the Cafe Bohemia, New York ; October 25, 1956

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Ray Crawford - Smooth Groove

Guitarist Ray Crawford, best known for his associations with pianist Ahmad Jamal and organist Jimmy Smith, only led one session in his early years. Because the Candid label soon went bankrupt, the set went unreleased altogether until this 1988 CD. Comprised of five Crawford originals, the session finds the guitarist playing fairly advanced hard bop with trumpeter Johnny Coles, baritonist Cecil Payne (in top form), pianist Junior Mance, bassist Ben Tucker, and drummer Frankie Dunlop. Everyone sounds fine, making one regret that this set fell between the cracks for so many years.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/smooth-groove-r160010

Ray Crawford
Smooth Groove

Tracks

1 The Compendium Suite 8:30
2 Miss April 7:39
3 Impossible 6:09
4 I Knew Prez 10:11
5 Smooth Groove 11:00
 

All Compositions by Ray Crawford

Personnel
Ray Crawford - g
Johnny Coles - tp
Cecil Payne - bs
Junior Mance - p
Ben Tucker - b
Frankie Dunlop - dr

Recorded at Nola Penthouse Sound Studios, New York ; January 26 & February 10, 1961

Sunday, February 3, 2013

Sonny Stitt Plays Arrangements From The Pen Of Quincy Jones (1955)

Sonny Stitt plus the early genius of Quincy Jones – a really great combination that makes for a standout session on Roost! As you might guess with Quincy handling the arrangements, the gorup here is bigger than usual for Stitt – especially given that the bulk of his Roost sessions were small group ones – but that aspect makes for a really strong record here, one that has Sonny's alto soaring out over the top of some hiply swinging Jones' charts, already infused with the kind of soul that would burst forth more famously in the 60s. Titles include a few nice originals, like "Quince" and "Sonny's Bunny", but even on the standards – like "Stardust", "Lover", and "Love Walked In" – Stitt's in top form, and solos with creativity and imagination that show him at the top of his talents!
© 1996-2012, Dusty Groove America, Inc.

Source : http://www.dustygroove.com/item.php?id=zzpc92v68c

Sonny Stitt
Plays Arrangements From The Pen
Of
Quincy Jones

(1955)

Tracks

1 My Funny Valentine (Rodgers, Hart) 3:30
2 Sonny’s Bunny (Stitt) 4:01
3 Come Rain or Come Shine (Mercer, Arlen) 4:23
4 Love Walked In (Gershwin, Gershwin) 4:06
5 If You Could See Me Now (Dameron, Sigman) 4:32
6 Quince (Jones) 7:01
7 Stardust (Carmichael, Parish) 3:11
8 Lover (Rodgers, Hart) 3:28
9 Come Rain or Come Shine [alt. take] (Arlen, Mercer) 4:21
10 Quince [alt. take] (Jones) 6:50
11 Stardust [alt. take] (Carmichael, Parish) 3:20


Personnel
[# 1, 2, 4 & 8] from the original Roost 12" LP "Sonny Stitt Plays Arrangements From The Pen Of Quincy Jones" (LP 2204)
Sonny Stitt - as
Jimmy Nottingham, Ernie Royal - tp
J.J. Johnson - tb
Anthony Ortega- fl & as
Seldon Powell - ts
Cecil Payne - bs
Hank Jones - p
Freddie Green - g
Oscar Pettiford - b
Jo Jones - d
Quincy Jones - cond & arr
Recorded in New York City ; September 30, 1955.
[# 3, 5, 6 & 7] from the original Roost 12" LP "Sonny Stitt Plays Arrangements From The Pen Of Quincy Jones" (LP 2204)
Sonny Stitt - as
Thad Jones, Joe Newman -tp
Jimmy Cleveland - tb
Anthony Ortega - fl & as
Seldon Powell - ts
Cecil Payne - bs)
Hank Jones - p
Freddie Green - g
Oscar Pettiford - b
Jo Jones - d
Quincy Jones - cond & arr
Recorded in New York City ; October 9, 1955
[# 9-11]
Same as above, previously unreleased, not on the original lp.

See also
http://www.mosaicrecords.com/discography.asp?number=208-MD-CD

Sunday, July 8, 2012

J. J. Johnson's Jazz Quintets

One can fault this CD for having brief playing time (a dozen selections totaling less than 33 minutes) and for not including the alternate takes, but the music is beyond criticism. When trombonist J.J. Johnson burst on the scene in the mid-'40s, his speed, fluency and quick ideas put him at the top of his field, where he remained for over a half century. This 1992 CD has the trombonist's first three sessions as a leader, music that qualifies as classic bebop. Johnson is matched with either altoist Cecil Payne, baritonist Leo Parker or tenor great Sonny Rollins (on one of his first dates) in quintets that also include Bud Powell, Hank Jones or John Lewis on piano; Leonard Gaskin, Al Lucas or Gene Ramey on bass; and Max Roach or Shadow Wilson on drums. Other than the ballads "Don't Blame Me" and "Yesterdays," the repertoire is comprised of originals (including Rollins' "Audobon") containing lots of tricky lines, concise but heated solos, and virtuosic playing. Until a more complete reissue takes its place, bop fans not owning the music (plus the alternates) on earlier LPs will definitely find this CD valuable.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/j-j-johnsons-jazz-quintets-mw0000235431

J.J. Johnson
J. J. Johnson's Jazz Quintets

Tracks

1 Jay Bird (Johnson) 2:56
2 Coppin' the Bop (Roach) 2:57
3 Jay Jay (Johnson) 3:04
4 Mad Be Bop (Johnson) 2:38
5 Boneology (Johnson) 2:57
6 Down Vernon's Alley (Johnson) 2:32
7 Audubon (Rollins) 2:45
8 Don't Blame Me (Fields, McHugh) 2:46
9 Goof Square (Rollins) 2:23
10 Bee Jay (Johnson) 2:24
11 Yesterdays (Otto Harbach, Kern) 2:57
12 Riffette (Johnson) 2:25

Personnel
[# 1-4]

J. J. Johnson - tb
Cecil Payne - as
Bud Powell - p
Leonard Gaskin - b
Max Roach - dr
Recorded in New York ; June 26, 1946
[# 5, 6, 11 & 12]

J. J. Johnson - tb
Leo Parker - bs
Hank Jones - p
Al Lucas - b
Shadow Wilson - dr
Recorded in New York ; December 24, 1947
[# 7-10]

J. J. Johnson - tb
Sonny Rollins - ts
John Lewis - p
Gene Ramey - b
Shadow Wilson - dr
Recorded in New York ; May, 1949

Sunday, September 18, 2011

Clark Terry & Jimmy Hamilton (feat. Barry Galbraith)

With the exception of three songs cut as V-Discs in 1947, this set contains flugelhornist Clark Terry's first recordings as a leader. Joined by trombonist Jimmy Cleveland, baritonist Cecil Payne, pianist Horace Silver, Oscar Pettiford on cello, bassist Wendell Marshall, and drummer Art Blakey, Terry performs eight obscure songs that are arranged quite expertly by Quincy Jones. Terry sounds much more influenced by Dizzy Gillespie than he would in just a couple of years, but his good-humored musical personality and control of his horn were already obvious. With Pettiford offering occasional cello solos (in addition to playing second bass) and Cleveland in top form, this is an LP long overdue to be reissued on CD.
Scott Yanow

Clark Terry
Swahili
&
The New York Jazz Quintet

Tracks

1 Swahili (Jones) 6:07
2 Double Play (Jones) 3:33
3 Slow Boat (Henderson, Terry) 4:28
4 Co-Op (Terry) 3:45
5 Kitten (Terry) 5:35
6 The Countess (Green, Terry) 6:42
7 Tuma (Jones) 3:06
8 Chuckles (Terry) 4:19
9 Bohemia After Dark (Pettiford) 3:51
10 I Get a Kick out of You (Porter) 4:31
11 Blues in My Room (Hamilton) 6:11
12 I Can't Give You Anything But Love (Fields, McHugh) 4:38
13 Chuckles (Terry) 2:43
14 Blues for Clarinet (Hamilton) 4:00
15 Solitude (Ellington) 5:24
16 What Am I Here For (Ellington) 4:41


Personnel
[# 1-8]
Clark Terry - tp
Jimmy Cleveland - tb
Cecil Payne - bs
Horace Silver - p
Oscar Pettiford - cel & b [# 2, 4, 5, 7 & 8]
Wendell Marshall - b [# 1, 3 & 6]
Art Blakey - dr
Quincy Jones - arr
Recorded at Fine Studio Recording, NYC, January 3 [# 1-4] & January 4 [# 5-8], 1955.
[# 9-16]
Clark Terry - tp
Jimmy Hamilton - cl
Barry Galbraith - g
Oscar Pettiford - b
Sidney Gross - rhth g
Osie Johnson - dr
Recorded in NYC, December 1954.

Saturday, November 6, 2010

Randy Weston

This CD reissues one of pianist Randy Weston's lesser-known sets. Weston, who already had a fairly distinctive style, mostly sticks to standards (which is quite unusual for him), including "The Man I Love," "This Can't Be Love," and "Do Nothing Till You Hear from Me." A quartet is featured that also includes baritonist Cecil Payne (who would be a longtime associate), bassist Ahmed Abdul-Malik, and drummer Wilbert Hogan. However, the date does include two of Weston's originals and is actually highlighted by the debut of his famous "Little Niles."
Scott Yanow
Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/with-these-hands-r152778

Randy Weston
With These Hands

Tracks

1 I Can't Get Started (Duke, Gershwin) 4:05
2 Do Nothin' Till You Hear from Me (Ellington, Russell) 2:55
3 Lifetime (Weston, Payne) 8:47
4 Little Niles (Hendricks, Weston) 3:02
5 The Man I Love (Gershwin, Gershwin) 4:38
6 These Foolish Things (Link, Marvell, Strachey) 4:17
7 This Can't Be Love (Hart, Rodgers) 5:15
8 Serenade in Blue (Gordon, Warren) 4:53

Personnel
Randy Weston - p
Cecil Payne - bs [except # 2 & 4]
Ahmed Abdul-Malik - b
Wilbert Hogan - dr

Recorded in Hackensack, New Jersey ; March 14 & 21, 1956

Monday, August 30, 2010

Jimmy Smith Plays the Blues

This is quite an unusual date for Jimmy Smith during his Blue Note years. He leads a quartet with baritone saxophonist Cecil Payne, guitarist Kenny Burrell and either Art Blakey or Donald Bailey on drums, one of the rare occasions he didn't use Lou Donaldson during this period. Except for a remake of Moe Koffman's hit "Swingin' Shepherd Blues," the remaining music remained unreleased until 1999, possibly because of minor sound flaws and the all-blues play list, according to reissue producer Michael Cuscuna. Regardless, this is great music that needs to be explored. Smith is still the master when it comes to slow blues on his instrument, and both Payne and Burrell contribute strong solos, especially during an extended "St. Louis Blues." Smith's four original blues are also very enjoyable.
Ken Dryden
Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:jxfixqlkld6e

Jimmy Smith
Six Views of the Blues

Tracks

1 St. Louis Blues (Handy) 8:38
2 The Swingin' Shepherd Blues ( Koffman) 3:55
3 Blues, No 1 (Smith) 6:25
4 Blues No. 3 (Smith) 7:10
5 Blues No. 4 (Smith) 10:45
6 Blues No. 2 (Smith) 9:00

Personnel
Cecil Payne - bs
Jimmy Smith - org
Kenny Burrell - g
Art Blakey - dr [# 1-3]
Donald Bailey - dr [# 4-6]

Recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey on July 16, 1958

Thursday, May 28, 2009

Dizzy Reece

This is one of trumpeter Dizzy Reece's finest recordings, a well-planned sextet date with baritonist Cecil Payne, Joe Farrell on tenor and flute, pianist Hank Jones, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Charlie Persip that is on the level of a Blue Note album. Reece (who contributed three diverse originals) performs mostly minor-toned songs that seem to really inspire the musicians. The solos tend to be concise but quite meaningful, and, overall, this hard bop but occasionally surprising session is quite memorable. Strange that Reece would not get another opportunity to lead a record date until 1970.
Scott Yanow

Dizzy Reece
Asia Minor

Tracks
1 The Shadow of Khan (Reece) 5:31
2 The Story of Love (Almaran, Thorn) 4:32
3 Yamask (Reece) 5:40
4 Spiritus Parkus [Parker's Spiritus] (Payne) 4:40
5 Summertime (Gershwin, Gershwin, Heyward) 7:51
6 Ackmet (Reece) 8:11

Personnel
Dizzy Reece - tp
Cecil Payne - bs
Joe Farrell - ts & fl
Hank Jones - p
Ron Carter - b
Charlie Persip - dr
Recorded in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey ; March 13, 1962.

Tuesday, February 3, 2009

Kenny Burrell (1957)

Guitarist Kenny Burrell, 25 at the time, is heard during one of his earlier sessions playing in his already recognizable straight-ahead style with a quintet that also features the underrated baritonist Cecil Payne, pianist Tommy Flanagan, bassist Doug Watkins and drummer Elvin Jones. This album is a bit brief in time (just over 36 minutes) but contains plenty of fine swinging on tunes such as "Don't Cry Baby," "Drum Boogie," "All of You" and Bud Powell's "Strictly Confidential." It's enjoyable music.
Scott Yanow

Kenny Burrell
Kenny Burrell
(1957)

Tracks
1 Don't Cry Baby (Bernie, Johnson, Unger) 8:20
2 Drum Boogie (Eldridge, Krupa) 9:14
3 Strictly Confidential (Powell) 6:25
4 All of You (Porter) 6:17
5 Perception (Green) 6:05

Personnel
Kenny Burrell - g
Cecil Payne - bs (except #4)
Tommy Flanagan - p
Doug Watkins - b
Elvin Jones - dr
Recorded in Hackensack, NJ ; February 1, 1957.

Saturday, December 20, 2008

Gigi Gryce

Oh...if these sessions could have only been issued in separate long forms with the bands that are included. Nica's Tempo comprises six tracks with Gigi Gryce's groundbreaking big band, and another four ostensibly as a member of the Thelonious Monk quartet, all from 1955. Each band showcases the estimable compositional and arranging genius of Gryce, as well as his unique sound on the alto saxophone. In this CD format, the music serves a purpose in displaying Gryce's many talents, but ultimately leaves the listener wanting more. What the orchestra tracks offer in terms of an advanced concept paired with extraordinary musicianship is indisputably brilliant. The combination of Gryce with Monk is unparalleled in another way, the brief but fruitful joining of jazz masters that helped both of them grow, while attaining a symbiosis that Monk only reached briefly with Coleman Hawkins, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, and later in extensia with Charlie Rouse. Gryce is perfectly situated in his element, able to not only exploit the individualism of his bandmates, but play his slightly tart alto sax in a manner that very few have ever imagined. His shining charts emphasize lower octave tones by baritone saxes, trombones, French horns, tuba, the lone trumpet of Art Farmer, and no extra woodwinds. This larger band, averaging ten pieces, is influenced by Duke Ellington during the fully flowered ballad "In a Meditating Mood," or traditional Irish music on the short and sweet, perfectly layered, bluesy swinger "Kerry Dance." Dizzy Gillespie's complex bop visage is present for the nifty, sub-toned, dynamically controlled in mezzo piano, hard surfaced and simmering "Smoke Signal," with clever meter switchings from 4/4, 3/4, or 2/4, while Bill Barber's tuba lurks underneath. The opener "Speculation" reflects its title, with the composer Horace Silver's piano solo intro nicely drawn out, merging into warm simple horn charts with off-minor flourishes -- a great jazz composition -- especially engaging considering this is an emerging Silver at age 27. Ernestine Anderson's Sarah Vaughan styled dusky voice is featured in slight echoplex production on the all-time classic "Social Call" about a left behind lover still hoping for a reconnect, while her confessional balladic rendition of (You'll Always Be) "The One I Love" is as passionate as any romantic love song ever. The Monk quartet tracks are as precious as can be, with the dynamite rhythm section of Percy Heath and Art Blakey really on top of it. The pianist is happy to hand the spotlight to Gryce on selections made more famous later on by Herbie Nichols or the Steve Lacy and Roswell Rudd bands. He's comfortably animated during "Shuffle Boil" cutting loose with flurries of notes, using staccato and staggered phrases for "Brake's Sake," and traverses the treacherous, slippery melody of "Gallop's Gallop" as if it had no degree of difficulty. Gryce's Nica's Tempo concludes in off-minor and obtuse angles as Monk liked it, with Heath and Blakey swinging expertly as only they could. These performances are nothing short of flawless, and though one might wish for additional tracks or outtakes, this album remains highly recommended with no reservation, and one for the ages.
Michael G. Nastos
Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:jzfwxq8gldte

Gigi Gryce
Nica's Tempo

Tracks

1 Speculation (Gryce) 4:03
2 In a Meditating Mood (Gryce, Hendricks) 4:22
3 Social Call (Gryce) 2:44
4 Smoke Signal (Gryce) 3:42
5 You'll Always Be the One I Love (Gryce) 3:26
6 Kerry Dance (Molloy) 3:00
7 Shuffle Boil (Monk) 4:59
8 Brake's Sake (Monk) 4:47
9 Gallop's Gallop (Monk) 5:25
10 Nica's Tempo (Gryce) 6:09

Personnel

Gigi Gryce - as (#1-10)
Art Farmer - tp (#1-6)
Eddie Bert - tb (#3-5)
Jimmy Cleveland - tb (#1-6)
Danny Bank - b s (#1-6)
Cecil Payne - b s (#1-6)
Gunther Schuller - frh (#1-6)
Julius Watkins - frh (#1-6)
Horace Silver - p (#1-6)
Oscar Pettiford - b (#1-6)
Art Blakey - dr (#3, 5, 7-10)
Kenny Clarke - dr (#1-6)
Ernestine Anderson - voc (#3-5)
Thelonious Monk - p (#7-10)
Percy Heath - b (#7-10)

Recorded in October 22, 1955 (#1-6) & October 15, 1955, all other selections.
________
Altoist Gigi Gryce is heard in two different settings on this LP-length CD reissue (which should have also contained his four slightly earlier quartet cuts for Savoy). Gryce heads a nonet using the same instrumentation as Miles Davis' Birth of the Cool group. Four of the songs are instrumentals ("Kerry Dance" and three of the leader's originals) while "Social Call" and "You'll Always Be the One I Love" feature early vocals by Ernestine Anderson. In addition, Gryce is showcased in a 1955 quartet with pianist Thelonious Monk, bassist Percy Heath and drummer Art Blakey. Although Monk contributed three originals (with the colorful names of "Shuffle Boil," "Brake's Sake" and "Gallop's Gallop") ironically, it is the one Gryce contribution ("Nica's Tempo") that became a standard. A fine reissue, Nica's Tempo is one of Denon's better Savoy sets.
Scott Yanow
Source : http://www.toptenreviews.com