Saturday, July 25, 2015

Heinrich Neuhaus plays Frédéric Chopin

Neuhaus’s true path to fame as a perfor­mer and teacher dates from after the October Revolution when he was appointed Piano Professor at the Kiev Conservatory (1918–22). He also frequently appeared on the concert platform both as recitalist – he introduced all ten Scriabin sonatas to the city – and as duo partner to, among others, Blumenfeld and Vladimir Horowitz. It was thence to Moscow where he remained, an indelible part of the capital’s musical life, for the next four decades. Soon after his arrival he repeated the Scriabin sonata cycle and introduced Muscovites to the music of Alexandrov, Myaskovsky, Szymanow­ski and fellow pianist Samuil Feinberg. Always an erratic, nervous performer in public, teaching gradually took precedence over his concert activities and he gave his Farewell Recital in Moscow in 1949. He was the leading piano professor at the Moscow Conservatoire from 1922 to 1964, and Director there between 1935 and 1937. It is almost certain that he relinquished the directorship in order to extricate himself from the lethal political intrigues that were an integral part of everyday life in Stalin’s Soviet Union. Despite this, Neuhaus was arrested and imprisoned by the KGB in November 1941 and it was due largely to the intervention of Emil Gilels that he was released many months later. His home and property confiscated, Neuhaus was exiled to Sverdlovsk, teaching at the Conservatory there until he was readmitted to Moscow in 1944. Neuhaus’s remarkable roll-call of pupils include Emil Gilels, Sviatoslav Richter and Yakov Zak (all three of whom will be featured in this series), his son Stanislav, as well as Ryszard Bakst, Leonid Brumberg, Victor Erebsko, Tatiana Goldfarb, Tamara Gusyeva, Zdenek Hnat, Vladimir Krainev, Maria Kruscelnycka, Radoslav Kvapil, Radu Lupu, Yevgeny Malinin, Lev Naumov, Alexei Nasedkin, Alexander Slobodyanik, Anatol Vedernikov, Eliso Virsaladze, Maria Vlad and Igor Zhukov.

*

Neuhaus was a ‘philosopher-pianist’. His deep thinking allied to his all-embracing appreciation of the arts in general, plus his skills as a linguist, made him an ideal tutor, stimulating the imagination and nurturing the thinking of his receptive pupils. As with all great teachers he never attempted to impose his personality upon his pupils – rather he encouraged their individuality. His personal motto, ‘You can’t produce talent but you can create a culture in which it thrives’, was born out of his respect for his ‘incomparable teacher’ Godowsky who, Neuhaus claimed, was ‘not a teacher of piano, but first and foremost, a teacher of music’. Not surprisingly, Neuhaus was much loved and deeply admired by his students. Vladimir Krainev, one of his last and most favoured pupils, described him as ‘a truly great phenomenon both in performance and pedagogics’, while Eliso Virsaladze spoke glowingly of ‘a man of rare artistry’. He held most of his classes in concert conditions, with a small gathering of pupils who were encour­aged to play for the student audience rather than the tutor. These lessons were usually held twice a week, with only those wishing to perform doing so. His home was also an ever-open house for his students.

Source : http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/dc.asp?dc=D_APR5660

Heinrich Neuhaus
Plays
Frédéric Chopin
(1810-1849)

Tracks

Mazurkas
1 N° 51 in F Minor, Op. 68 n° 4 1:41
2 N° 37 in C Minor, Op. 52 n° 2  2:36
3 N° 27 in E Minor, Op. 41 n° 2  1:55
4 N° 32 in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 50 n° 3  4:32
5 N° 33 in B Major, Op. 56 n° 1  3:52
6 N° 35 in C Minor, Op. 56 n° 3  5:02
7 N° 36 in A Minor, Op. 59 n° 1  3:02
8 N° 40 in F Minor, Op. 63 n° 2  1:29
9 N° 41 in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 63 n° 3  1:50
10 N° 6 in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 7 n° 2  2:39
11 N° 4 in E-Flat Minor, Op. 6 n° 4  1:13
12 N° 39 in B Major, Op. 63 n° 1  1:55
13 N° 36 in A Minor, Op. 59 n° 1  3:13
14 N° 26 in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 41 n° 1  3:02

Nocturnes
15 N° 5 in F-Sharp Major, Op. 15 n° 2  3:36
16 N° 3 in B Major, Op. 9 n° 3  6:15
17 N° 18 in E Major, Op. 62 n° 2
18 N° 15 in F Major, Op. 55 n° 1  4:22
19 N° 16 in E-Flat Major, Op. 55 n° 2  4:38

20 Polonaise-Fantasie in A-Flat Major, Op. 61  11:16

*

Heinrich Neuhaus - p

Recorded  1946 [# 6] ; March 5, 1949 [# 1, 2, 11 & 13] ;  ? [# 10, 14 & 15] ; 1949 [# 3, 7, 18 & 19] ; October 11, 1951 [# 12] ; 1951 [# 16 & 17] ; 1953 [# 5, 8 & 9] ; & April 23, 1958 ([# 20] or October 11, 1949 ?) [# 4, 20]

5 comments:

Melanchthon said...

http://www56.zippyshare.com/v/8Gsx6FBJ/file.html
http://www56.zippyshare.com/v/T1PDNiWz/file.html

musician3 said...

EXCELLENT..............................THANK YOU FOR ALL

loriartx said...

XXXmerci for any genius from neuhaus or feinberg XXX

BachRocks44 said...

Thanks for another great recording.

rubingould said...

Thank you.