Thursday, April 20, 2017

Ruby Braff - Blowing Around the World

"I’ve always hated the trumpet. I didn‘t choose it. I wanted the B flat tenor saxophone. When my folks went to the store and saw what they thought was a tenor (it was actually a baritone), they said : “This is ridiculous”. They brought home this peculiar thing with valves on it, which I hated for ever. Never did care for it.
In school sometimes there would be an instructor that would give you lessons, but not very much. Unfortunately, I’m mostly self–taught. I hope to fix that one of these days.
As for inspirations—I never even knew what Louis Armstrong was. I only heard people talk about artists that were on the radio or on the screen—the Tommy Dorseys, the Artie Shaws, that sort of thing. And they looked like they were having such a marvellous, glamorous life, living in hotels, so well–dressed. It seemed like the epitome of luxury. I had no idea that they were all miserable! My first records were made in Boston, for a label called Storyville, and for Savoy Records, with Edmond Hall and Vic Dickenson. But they were terrible recordings—off broadcasts, mainly. Very sad things. I couldn’t play, either. The one made in a club where you could hear the audience more than the music was one of the better records.
Sure, they’ve made statements about my supposedly combining a modern approach with a feeling for traditional forms. Well, people say all sorts of things, because they want to categorise and label. I’ve only ever had two labels. Either it’s good or it stinks.
It always makes me laugh. If you heard David Oistrakh, would you say to him : “Man, what bag are you in ?” No, you wouldn’t. Yet they say that to a musician who has spent 30 or 40 years trying to evolve a way of playing.
So it’s silly. Is he playing good or isn’t he ? That’s the only thing that counts. But I know a lot of people don’t agree with me; Particularly the critics. They must put labels on music, so they can have it like canned goods on their shelf.
The truth of the matter is : there are a couple of idioms of music, the so–called symphonic world and the improvisational world of jazz, an American music which is a mixture of European ingredients, the Negro cultures from New Orleans. and Tin Pan Alley.
It’s also silly to keep talking about the blues as the most vital part of jazz. The blues is just a 12–bar series of chord changes which doesn’t really mean that much. How does somebody play a well–written, well–constructed song, keeping the character of it and then adding something to it ? I think that’s important..."

Ruby Braff
Blowing around The World
(1959)

Tracks

1 In A Little Spanish Town (Wayne, Lewis, Young)  3:09
2 April in Paris (Harburg, Duke)  3:47
3 Russian Lullaby (Berlin)  3:48
4 Too-Ra-Roo-Ra-Loo-Ra (Shannon)  4:06
5 Nagasaki (Warren, Dixon)  5:02
6 Song of India (P.D.)  3:18
7 Come Back to Sorrento (P.D.)  4:30
8 South Of the Border (Kennedy, Carr)  6:37
9 Loch Lomond (P.D.)  3:53
10 Chinatown My Chinatown (Schwartz, Jerome)  3:06

*

Personnel
Ruby Braff - tp
Bob Brookmeyer - p
Barry Galbraith - g
Joe Benjamin - b
Buzzy Drootin - dr

Recorded in 1959
________
"...I don’t know what they mean by “blues feeling”. That’s a very mysterious phrase to me. I’ve heard it applied to players that are incredibly horrible, ridiculous musical morons.
These congenital idiots play insipid nonsense and they say: “Man, don’t he play the blues!” I wouldn’t want anyone to think that I play the blues if that’s what they imagine it is. Who cares about blues, anyway ? Admittedly. it’s part of the folk heritage. There were many singers who made up millions of variations on those same kind of chords, sometimes with a few different changes here and there — Handy would have a few. Jelly Roll Morton was very inventive when it came to writing blues; they all have a little character of their own.
But the guys who are praised for playing the same set of changes, the same amount of foolish notes all the time — can they play anything else ? As a matter of fact, when they play some other tune, it sounds like they’re still playing the blues. After all, you’re supposed to be composing something while you’re playing. Or trying to.
I love to worry about composition when I play. There is no other way to know if someone is talented or not, outside of whether what he plays hangs together in a composite form.
How else can we tell ? Whether he’s drumming, singing, whistling, dancing or whatever, it must hang together.
And if it doesn’t, I can’t see how people read things into it. On what basis do they judge talent—reading ability, how fast he can run the notes ? Out of a symphony of 180 musicians, there’s liable to be three that have talent. They can all play their instruments beautifully that has nothing to do with having talent.
Talent is something that very few people have, really. And there are no geniuses. Maybe Louis and Duke are something in jazz. But they keep throwing these words around. If Albert Einstein is a genius, for example, how can Albert Ayler be a genius ? It’s ridiculous. It doesn’t make any sense.
There’s more talent than there are geniuses, but not everybody was born to write or play. I think they’d be much better off if they would just try to love what they’re doing, forget all the meaningless words, and let the axe fall where it may."
Ruby Braff (Talking in 1968)

Source : http://www.jazzprofessional.com/interviews/Ruby%20Braff_1.htm

40 comments:

Davidscott789 said...

Thank you!

Tim said...

I love Ruby Braff. I have never seen this record before so thank you very much!

ita diegues said...

Thank you Melanchthon.

Orbyt said...

Mel, You must be a psychic. You seem to have a knack for posting very rare albums that populate my dusty wish list. Many, many thanks for this exquisite bijou, with Barry Galbraith and Brookmeyer no less.

the jazzman said...

Many thanks for this rare Ruby.

Beppo said...

Thank you for this!

L.O.L. said...

Thanks, Mel!

luthier said...

Thank you Mel for a great Ruby Braff album.

zero said...

Thanks for the music and the interesting interview excerpt.

Kneigh said...

Many thanx for this fine Braff post, Mel!! Not seen before. Like zero said, thanx too for the interview & review inserts also.

Blue Eyes said...

Thanks a lot Mel for this tasty album!

aroonie said...

A big thank you to Mel for this one. New to me and very welcome. From the #1 Braff fan! :-)

Great taste and a great selection of music.

jazztap said...

merci

rubberduck said...

Many thanks, Mel

El Rana said...

Wonderful !!

Ruby embodies jazz !

It's also fantastic to hear Brookmeyer at the piano. His musicality always shines !

Chock full of swing and invention...

Thanks Mel

Pancho in Chile

Prof. Yaffle said...

Thank you

Jorge del Parque said...

Muchas gracias!

deGallo said...

Thank you. Nice!!!

Paco's brother said...

Un grand merci en Mib Majeur !

Jazzsoulman said...

thank you

flyra said...

"I’ve always hated the trumpet" (in comments) - strange: I say "I've always loved the trumpet".
Thanks for the music and the immediate response about the file hosts!!!

Chris said...

Thanks Mel I was waiting for a re-up of this fine album

picoso said...

Fantastic, Ruby Braff what a wonderful jazzmen, many thanks.

ProfessorCalculus said...

Thanks Mel.

XAVIER JOAN said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
jazzfan1 said...

Any chance you could follow this with Braff's exquisite duets with Ellis Larkins?

XAVIER JOAN said...

MUY PERO QUE MUY AGRADECIDO A MELANCTHON POR SU LABOR DESINTERESADA. CON ZIPPY ES TODO MÁS FÁCIL Y LO DEL PASSWORD, MAL MENOR.

GRACIAS A GENTE COMO TÚ OTROS SOBREVIVIMOS. UN ABRAZO.

Otis Foster said...

Thnx melanchthon. I love the interview - typical dyspeptic braff. George Wein hired braff for a gig with Wein's band, and after the first number, braff told Wein "get the f*&%k off the bandstand" because he disliked Wein's playing.

As braff says "the music is either good or it stinks".

kristophermc28 said...

Thanks Mel!

zhuk0815 said...

Thank you.

Fred Archtop said...

Thank you Mel !

AmyBRAINS said...

Thanks a lot, Melanchthon.

francisco santos said...

BIG THX!...

Melanchthon said...

http://www20.zippyshare.com/v/K2GXWJUQ/file.html
http://www20.zippyshare.com/v/rX3FYUVZ/file.html

DEEP said...

Rupert was the poison DWARF......unfortunately I was subjected to his presence more than I wanted to be .....at Eddie Condon's in NYC.
But...that notwithstanding...clasp (lower case for emphasis)

zoltanzylox said...

Thanks Mel!

Kovina Kris said...

I was hoping this one would come around again. Braff projects always seem to be first-rate. Thank you Mel!

Anonymous said...

"Rupert was the poison DWARF" - very interesting comments around about Braff's hideous personality. However, for the uninitiated, the guy sounds fantastic. Good case for an honest biography, anyone knows one? Thanks MM, another great upload.

Jazz Padd said...

Thanks! Some choice Barry Galbraith on guitar.

Ghjuvan-Paul said...

Many thanks Mel !