Thursday, October 20, 2011

Vladimir Sofronitsky Plays Scriabin (Studio Recordings, vol. 1)

Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin, the noted Russian composer, was born on Christmas Day and died at Eastertide -- according to Western-style calendrical reckoning, 7 January 1872 - 14 April, 1915. No one was more famous during his lifetime, and few were more quickly ignored after his death. Although he was never absent from the mainstream of Russian music, the outside world neglected him until recently. Today, there is worldwide resurgence of interest in his music and ideas.
Scriabin wrote five symphonies, including the Divine Poem (1903), the Poem of Ecstasy (1907), and the Poem of Fire or Prometheus (1909). His ten piano sonatas are staples of many pianists' repertoire, with the Fifth being perhaps the most popular, while the Seventh (White Mass) and Ninth (Black Mass) follow close. Vladimir Horowitz in his late sixties began playing the Tenth, and it remains today in vogue among more daring virtuosi.
Scriabin's hundreds of Preludes, Etudes and Poems are considered masterpieces of 20th century pianism, and his "titled" pieces such as Fragilité, Satanic Poem, Etrangeté, Désir, and Caresse Dansée, are greatly admired. Scriabin's style changed enormously as he progressed. The early pieces are romantic, fresh and easily accessible, while his later compositions explore harmony's further reaches. It is thought by scholars, that had Scriabin lived beyond his brief 43 years, he would have preceded the Austrian school of duodecaphony, and Moscow would have become the center of atonality.
Immediately upon Scriabin's sudden death, Sergei Rachmaninoff toured Russia in a series of all-Scriabin recitals. It was the first time he played music other than his own in public. In those days Scriabin was known as a pianist and Rachmaninoff was considered only as a composer. Scriabin, thus, was posthumously responsible for his friend and classmate's later pianistic career in Europe and America.

Source : http://www.scriabinsociety.com/biography.html


Vladimir Sofronitsky
Plays
Scriabin
(Studio Recordings, vol. 1)

Tracks

Piano Sonata in F-sharp minor, Op. 23

1 I. Dramatico  5:58
2 II. Allegretto  2:25
3 III. Andante  4:33
4 IV. Presto con fuoco  5:46

Préludes, Op. 11
(1888–1896)

5 N° 1 in C major - Vivace  0:47
6 N° 2 in A minor - Allegretto  1:49
7 N° 3 in G major - Vivo  0:53
8 N° 4 in E minor - Lento  1:55
9 N° 5 in D major - Andante cantabile  1:41
10 N° 6 in B minor - Allegro  0:51
11 N° 7 in A major - Allegro assai  0:50
12 N° 8 in F-sharp minor - Allegro  1:29
13 N° 9 in E major - Andantino  1:30
14 N° 10 in C-sharp minor - Andante  1:17
15 N° 11 in B major - Allegro assai  1:53
16 N° 12 in G-sharp minor - Andante  1:37
17 N° 13 in G-flat major - Lento  1:45
18 N° 15 in D-flat major - Lento  2:11
19 N° 16 in B-flat minor - Misterioso  2:03
20 N° 17 in A-flat major - Allegretto  0:41
21 N° 19 in E-flat major - Affettuoso  1:06
22 N° 20 in C minor - Appassionato  1:01
23 N° 21 in B-flat major - Andante  1:28
24 N° 22 in G minor - Lento  1:01

25 Prelude for the left hand in C-sharp minor, op. 9 n° 1  2:46

Three Pieces, Op. 2

26 N° 1 Etude in C-sharp minor  3:07
27 N° 2 Prelude in B major  0:58
28 N° 3 Impromptu à la Mazur in C major  1:35

29 Impromptu in F-sharp minor, op. 14, n° 2  4:48
30 Impromptu in B-flat minor, op. 12, n° 2  4:40

Two Poemes Op. 44

31 N° 1 in C major  1:14
32 N° 2 in C major  1:11

33 Poème in D major, op. 32, n° 2  1:40
34 Waltz in A-flat major, op. 38  6:04


 
Vladimir Sofronitsky p

Recorded in Moscow ; between 1946 & 1953

1 comment:

juan pedro said...

I would love if you upload this. Thanks.