Monday, April 20, 2015

Scriabin & the Scriabinians (Rec. 1910-1959)

This record, made up of documents from the archives of USSR Radio, offers a panorama of the historic interpretations of Scriabin's work which extends over a period of half a century. After the composer himself, who delivers the testament of his art as it was recorded on cylinders in 1910, four of the most eminent Soviet pianists take their turn ; two of them (Goldenweiser and Feinberg) knew Scriabin personally ; the others (Neuhaus and Sofronitsky) were numbered among the most favoured of his interpreters. Five personnalities, five different approaches — this relation does not imply a pastiche, but rather five different visions which have in common a profound understanding and personal love for the music, which is far from easy to interpret, and, above all, a mastery of style which makes each of them a model performance. Comparisons, preferences, oppositions will necessarily arise, but they will be defined by the highest references in the tradition of piano interpretation. The pieces assembled here are all miniatures, most of them from Scriabin's first period, a few from the middle period (Désir, Op. 57), and do not include the grand sonatas or the work of his final years, wth the exception of the apocalyptic Towards the Flame played by Sofronitsky at the end of the record. But through all these Preludes, Etudes and Mazurkas, still infused as they are with the influence of Chopin and Liszt, there breathes more than a hint of Scriabin's future vocabulary.
Scriabin, Goldenweiser and Feinberg all shared the same alma mater : the Moscow Conservatory, of which they were students and, later, teachers. It was in this same Conservatory that Neuhaus, for several decades, dispensed what will no doubt remain the most notable piano teaching of the twentieth century. And for almost twenty years (1942-1961), Sofronitsky, once the pupil of Leonid Nikolaev in Petrograd, was himself counted among the teaching staff of this illustrious establishment.
Formed at the piano classes of Zverev and Safonov, the greatest Muscovite teachers of the time, Scriabin was a virtuoso of the first order, and obtained the Gold Medal for piano in 1892. However, very early on he made it a priciple to interpret nothing but his own compositions. Without ambiguity, he declared : "I play only Scriabin." The recordings he left prove that he played "him" like no-one else, and above all, exactly as one might imagine a priori : an impassioned, vehement interpretation, with at the same time a certain liberty and a solid dynamic construction, often beginning a piece with moderate verve and then intensifying it, and a technique which is particulary impressive in the precision of the striking of chords, as we ca hear in the famous Study in D-flat minor Op. 8 n° 21...
André Lischke, from the booklet

Scriabin
and the
Scriabinians
(1910-1959)

Tracks
1 Prélude Op. 11 n° 1  0:46
2 Prélude Op. 11 n° 13  1:39
3 Prélude Op. 11 n° 14  0:41
4 Prélude Op. 22 n° 1  1:10
5 Mazurka Op. 40 n° 2  0:50
6 Désir Op. 57 n° 1  1:19
7 Etude Op. 8 n° 12  1:47
8 Poème Op. 32 n° 1  3:07

Alexandre Scriabine - p
(Recorded 1910)

*

9 Prélude Op. 15 n° 1  1:50
10 Prélude Op. 15 n° 2  1:01
11 Prélude Op. 15 n° 3  1:09
12 Prélude Op. 15 n° 4  1:26
13 Prélude Op. 16 n° 1  2:21
14 Prélude Op. 16 n° 2  1:12
15 Prélude Op. 16 n° 3  1:46
16 Prélude Op. 16 n° 4  0:49
17 Prélude Op. 16 n° 5  0:32

Alexandre Goldenweiser - p
(Recorded 1957)

*

18 Mazurka Op. 3 n° 1  3:43
19 Mazurka Op. 3 n° 2  2:07
20 Mazurka Op. 3 n° 3  1:54
21 Mazurka Op. 3 n° 4  3:52
22 Mazurka Op. 3 n° 5  4:02
23 Mazurka Op. 3 n° 6  2:13
24 Mazurka Op. 3 n° 7  3:26

Samuel Feinberg - p
(Recorded 1952)

*

25 Prélude Op. 11 n° 2  1:58
26 Prélude Op. 11 n° 5  1:38
27 Prélude Op. 11 n° 8  1:23
28 Prélude Op. 11 n° 11  1:17
29 Prélude Op. 11 n° 12  1:24
30 Prélude Op. 13 n° 1  1:56
31 Prélude Op. 13 n° 2  0:35
32 Prélude Op. 13 n° 3  1:05
33 Prélude Op. 13 n° 4  0:53
34 Prélude Op. 13 n° 5  0:50
35 Prélude Op. 13 n° 6  1:21
Heinrich Neuhaus - p
(Recorded between 1949 & 1953)

*

36 Etude Op. 8 n° 2  1:46
37 Etude Op. 8 n° 5  2:21
38 Etude Op. 2 n° 1  3:12
39 Vers la Flamme Op. 72  5:18

Vladimir Sofronitsky - p
(Recorded between 1950 & 1959)

8 comments:

Ponis said...

Please re-post.

Melanchthon said...

http://www30.zippyshare.com/v/trJvmjwF/file.html
http://www30.zippyshare.com/v/Y9RAJYto/file.html

rm said...

merci beaucoup

Li Jianmin said...

Link 2 seems broken.

chuchuni said...

Merci Mel!

paul said...

Many thanks.

Anonymous said...

Would you mind reupload, MM, in your spare time?

Funjer said...

Please re post