Thursday, February 13, 2020

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Joe Pass - Virtuoso #1

This is the album that made Joe Pass famous. On what was actually his second set of unaccompanied guitar solos (Virtuoso n° 4 from a month earlier was released years later), Pass shows that it is possible to play unaccompanied versions of such up-tempo tunes as "How High the Moon," "Cherokee," and "The Song Is You" on guitar. Pass not only performs the melodies and heated solos, but provides basslines and harmonies while using a conventional technique (unlike Stanley Jordan's later tapping). Pass would record many unaccompanied recordings and perform at numerous solo concerts during the next 20 years ; this is the set that started it all, and it is a certified classic. An essential CD.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:kxfwxqrgldje

Joe Pass
Virtuoso
(VICJ-23536)

Tracks

1 Night and Day (Porter)  3:34
2 Stella by Starlight (Washington, Young)  5:10
3 Here's That Rainy Day (Burke, VanHeusen)  3:36
4 My Old Flame (Burke, Coslow, Johnston)  5:17
5 How High the Moon (Hamilton, Lewis)  4:59
6 Cherokee (Noble)  3:38
7 Sweet Lorraine (Burwell, Parish)  4:09
8 Have You Met Miss Jones ? (Hart, Rodgers)  4:44
9 'Round Midnight (Hanighen, Monk, Williams)  3:38
10 All the Things You Are (Hammerstein, Kern)  4:00
11 Blues for Alican (Pass)  5:28
12 The Song Is You (Hammerstein, Kern)  4:33

*

Joe Pass - g

Recorded August 28, 1973.

Monday, May 29, 2017

Nat King Cole Trio - Complete Early Transcriptions (1938-1941)

The Complete Early Transcriptions of The King Cole Trio 1938-1941 (Vintage Jazz Classics VJC-1026/27/28/29) has wonderful, detailed liners which cover that era of the Trio's career. According to these notes, Nat formed the Trio in September 1937, as The King Cole Swingsters, to play a gig at the Swannee Inn on North LaBrea in Hollywood California that turned out to run six months.
The group consisted of himself on piano and lead vocal, Oscar Moore on guitar and Wesley Prince on bass. Nat also handled most of the arrangements and associated work, a job which was complicated by the fact that this was a rather unorthodox instrumentation and moreover was without a staple instrumental section, drums. Oscar Moore would become one of the most influential musicians in the early era of electric guitar, racking up numerous awards and a generation of attentive disciples on the instrument. But at the beginning here, Oscar is on an acoustic guitar.
What was this group like ? Well, in 1937, Swing Was King. There was 'hot' swing playing all over, but jazz and popular song were not the separate entities they would evolve into by the 1950's. Most of the widely heard stuff was pop music featuring swing influences in music and scat vocal, generally falling into four types: ballads, blues (which often blended), novelty or dance (which often blended). To get a sense of the popular side of that scene one could give a listen to say, Judy Garland's earliest Decca singles. Or this set, because the instruments of the Trio, musically and vocally, were largely oriented toward delivering a flexible, bouncy and neatly organized form of novelty swing pop.
Nat's vocals were present from the beginning, but solos are rare. Excepting the occasional pure instrumental trip, the Trio consistently perform, in unison, the jaunty numbers replete with thirties scat that goes something like this :

"rrat-dat-rrat-dat-do-dat-do-day"

And a polly wolly do dah day. So, the early Trio recordings tend to be more firmly dated than they'd be from say, 1943 on, by which time Trio vocalizing had been reduced to an occasional, differently styled feature. To put us back into perspective, let's say we just walked into the joint and are hearing The King Cole Swingsters. What we'd hear is timely, accessible, but at the same time, hip and extremely "neat." Rock solid musicianship plays a stripped-down framework of music, pared down to essential lines of pulsing rhythm and melody, distilling the tight integration of time with melody that typified the popular song of the day into a dark glass which the trio worked into bold, attractive art pieces. Lyric and all that jive are liberally printed around it, and in most vocalized tunes we have something of the song equivalent of a striking, custom-made deco cologne bottle. Solid jive, Jack.

Source : http://apileocole.alongthehall.com/chatter/chat1938.html

Nat King Cole
Trio
Complete Early Transcriptions
(1938-1941)

Tracks

Cd. 1

1 Mutiny in the Nursery (Mercer)  2:47
2 F.D.R. Jones (Rome)  3:03
3 The Sheik of Araby (Smith, Snyder, Wheeler)  2:12
4 The Blue Danube (Strauss)  2:46
5 Button, Button (Boland, Reichmer)  2:43
6 Jingle Bells (Pierpont)  2:28
7 Swanee River (Foster)  2:23
8 With Plenty of Money and You (Dubin, Warren)  2:10
9 Don't Blame Me (Fields, McHugh, Raksin, Wess)  2:19
10 Lullaby in Rhythm (Goodman, Hirsch, Profit, Sampson)  2:44
11 Dark Rapture (Goodman, Kurtz, Sampson)  3:10
12 By the River Sainte Marie (Leslie, Warren)  2:11
13 The Wiggly Walk (Jacobs, Oppenheim, Palmer ?)  2:49
14 Flea Hop (Unknown)  2:39
15 Chopsticks (DeLulli)  2:40
16 Patty Cake, Patty Cake (Baker Man) (Johnson, Razaf, Waller)  2:39
17 Blue Skies (Berlin)  2:07
18 Liza (All the Clouds'll RollAway) (Gershwin, Gershwin, Kahn)  2:54
19 Three Blind Mice (Morehouse, Trad., Trumbauer)  2:05
20 Caravan (Ellington, Mills, Tizol)  2:15
21 There's No Anesthetic for Love (Prince)  3:11
22 Dixie Jamboree (Cole, Davis, Johnson, Unknown)  3:00
23 Ta-De-Ah (Unknown)  2:35
24 Riffin' at the Bar-B-Q (Unknown)  2:00
25 Harlem Swing (Unknown)  2:26
26 I Lost Control of Myself (Unknown)  3:11

*

Cd. 2

1 The Land of Make Believe (Unknown)  2:46
2 That "Please Be Mine"-Able Feeling (Unknown)  2:12
3 Dancing in the Street (Norris, Norris)  3:01
4 You're So Different (Fain, Parish)  2:55
5 I Wouldn't Have Known It (Bryant, Cole)  2:28
6 Let's Get Happy (Cole, Unknown)  2:12
7 Undecided (Robin, Shavers)  2:20
8 'Tain't What You Do (It's the Way That You Do It) (Oliver, Young)  2:49
9 Do You Wanna Jump, Children ? (Bryant, Donahue, Seisman, VanHeusen)  2:40
10 Riffin' in F Minor (Unknown)  2:02
11 Ol' Man Mose Ain't Dead (Cahn, Chaplin)  3:25
12 Blue Lou (Mills, Sampson)  2:56
13 Honey (Gillespie, Simons, Whiting)  2:06
14 Russian Lullaby (Berlin)  2:01
15 Georgie Porgie (Trad.)  2:19
16 The Limp (Unknown)  2:49
17 Snug as a Bug in a Rug (Unknown)  2:29
18 Liebestraum (Liszt, Ram)  3:17
19 Fidgety Joe (Loesser, Malneck ?)  2:52
20 Two Against One (Unknown)  2:57
21 Some Like It Hot (Biondi, Krupa, Lane, Loesser)  3:04
22 I Like to Riff (Cole)  2:27
23 Crazy Rhythm (Caesar, Kahn, Meyer)  1:56
24 Moonglow (DeLange, Hudson, Mills)  2:52
25 Don't Let That Moon Get Away (Burke, Monaco)  2:41
26 My Blue Heaven (Donaldson, Whiting)  1:32

*

Cd. 3

1 I Was Doing All Right (Gershwin, Gershwin)  2:12
2 I Can't Get Started (Duke, Gershwin)  2:37
3 Old Man Moon (Carmichael)  2:12
4 Carry Me Back to Old Virginny (Bland)  2:09
5 Moon Song (Coslow, Johnston)  3:02
6 Baby Won't You Please Come Home (Warfield, Williams)  2:12
7 Sweet Lorraine (Burwell, Parish)  3:16
8 Rosetta (Hines, Woode)  2:05
9 Trompin' (Unknown)  2:34
10 You're My Life (Unknown)  2:47
11 Hoy Soy (Unknown)  2:27
12 Black Spider Stomp (Cole, Moore)  2:51
13 Take 'Em (Unknown)  2:19
14 Scategoria (Unknown)  2:25
15 Rhythm Serenade (Unknown)  2:29
16 Rib Town Shuffle (Unknown)  2:42
17 Music'll Chase Your Blues Away (Unknown)  1:57
18 I'll Gather up My Memories (Unknown)  3:26
19 A Fool's Affair (Unknown)  3:27
20 Jump Jack Jump (Roberts)  2:43
21 I Knew a Time (Unknown)  3:02
22 Mine You'll Always Be (Unknown)  3:13
23 Doin' the Bow Wow (Unknown)  2:39
24 Lilla Mae (Unknown)  2:14

*

Cd. 4

1 Slew Foot Joe (Unknown)  2:10
2 1, 2, 3, 4 (Gabler, Jenkins)  2:06
3 Crazy 'Bout Rhythm (Unknown)  1:59
4 Off the Beam (Unknown)  2:14
5 King Cole Blues (Unknown)  2:03
6 Jivin' With the Notes (Unknown)  1:56
7 Early Morning Blues (Cole, Coleman, McCarthy, Terry)  2:51
8 Bedtime (Sleep Baby Sleep) (Black, Cole, Roberts, Rocco)  2:40
9 Honey Hush (trad. arr. Cole, Turner, Turner)  2:13
10 French Toast (Cox, Morton, Ranking Roger ?)  2:10
11 Vine Street Jump (Unknown)  2:34
12 B-Flat (Unknown)  2:25
13 You Send Me (Adamson, McHugh)  2:04
14 Love Is My Alibi (Unknown)  3:06
15 Pogo Stick Bounce (Ahbez ?)  2:14
16 Gone With the Draft [# 1] (Cole, Dramin, Prince)  2:10
17 Jumpin' With the Mop (Cole)  2:20
18 Jam Man (Greene)  2:00
19 Let's Try Again (Hammond, Jones, Monroe)  2:58
20 Scotchin' With the Soda (Riley)  2:22
21 Fudge Wudge (Unknown)  3:44
22 Smokey Joe (Van Phillips, Ascher ?)  1:55
23 Windy City Boogie Woogie (Unknown)  2:19
24 Gone With the Draft [#2] (Cole, Dramin, Prince)  1:55
25 This Side Up (Cole)  2:41
26 Ode to a Wild Clam (Cole, Jenkins)  2:21

*

Personnel
Nat "King" Cole - p, vc & clst
Oscar Moore - ac. or el. g & vc
Wesley Prince - b & vc
[Cd. 1, # 21-26 & Cd. 2, # 1-6]
Bonnie Lake - vc
Juanelda Carter - vc
[Cd. 2, # 23-26 & Cd. 3, # 1-4] * "Pauline and her Perils" aka "The Six Hits and a Miss"
Pauline Byrns, Vince Degan, Bill Seckler, Howard Hudson & Mark MacLean - vc
[Cd. 3, # 17-24] * "The Dreamers"
Unidentified black male vocal quartet

Recorded in diverse locations, Hollywood & Los Angeles ; between October 1938 & February (early) 1941

See the detailed booklet for more informations

Sonny Stitt - Low Flame & Feelin's

This release presents two complete original albums showcasing Sonny Stitt (1924-1982) in a quartet setting with organist Don Patterson : Low Flame (Jazzland JLP971 ; 1962) and Feelin’s (Roost LPS2247 ; 1962). Patterson (born on July 22, 1936 in Columbus, Ohio ; he died on February 10, 1988 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) began playing piano at an early age and was heavily influenced by Erroll Garner in his youth. In 1956, he switched to organ after hearing Jimmy Smith play the instrument, and during the early ‘60s, he began playing regularly with Stitt. Patterson started releasing material as a leader on Prestige Records in 1964 (with Pat Martino and Billy James as sidemen). His most commercially successful album was Holiday Soul (1964), which reached #85 on the Billboard 200 in 1967. Patterson’s troubles with drug addiction hobbled his career in the 1970s, during which time he lived in Gary, Indiana, and occasionally recorded for Muse Records. He moved to Philadelphia during the ‘80s, where he made a small comeback, but his health deteriorated over the course of the decade, and he died there in 1988.
On the two LPs presented here, the group is completed by Paul Weeden on guitar and Billy James on drums. While Stitt and Patterson cut plenty of albums together, the sessions on this CD mark the entire recorded output by this exact quartet, which was Stitt’s working band at the time. “Don, Paul and I were the house band at EdgehiIl’s in Atlantic City", recalled Billy James. “l’m from Pittsburgh, and I met Don in Cleveland, then went to New York in 1960. Paul had worked with Wild Bill Davis and he knew about the New Jersey shore music scene. So we ended up at Edgehill’s. Sonny was hired to work there, to play with The Three Sounds, but he said he’d rather work with us. And so we got to know him. He was like a father to us, our Juilliard. Don and I learned so much from him; he raised us, musically. He showed us what we should do, what we shouldn’t do, exposed us to a lot of music that we would have never been aware of if it hadn’t been for Sonny. When we were first with him, I wanted to sound like Elvin Jones. Sonny used to have me sit on my left hand to keep me from being so busy. ‘You’ve got to get your time together before you can get fancy’, he’d tell me. It used to bug me but, actually, he was right and I thank him to this day. Playing with Sonny opened a lot of doors for us and eventually Don and I were able to go out and have our own thing."
Lawrence Steel, 2013, from the booklet

Sonny Stitt
Low Flame
Feelin's

Tracks

1 Low Flame (Feather, Stitt)  4:59
2 Put Your Little Foot Right Out (Spier)  5:25
3 Cynthia Sue (Weeden)  6:02
4 Donald Duck (Patterson)  4:40
5 Close Your Eyes (Petkere)  3:43
6 Silly Billy (Stitt)  4:58
7 Baby, Do You Ever Think Of Me ? (Stitt)  2:55
8 Fine And Dandy (James, Swift)  7:52
9 O Sole Mio (trad. arr. Stitt)  3:48
10 Feelin's (Stitt)  3:56
11 Nightmare (Stitt)  2:21
12 S'posin' (Razaf, Denniker)  6:23
13 Look Up (Stitt)  6:14
14 Goodnight Ladies (trad. arr. Stitt)  3:52
15 If I Should Lose You (Robin, Rainger)  5:20
16 Hollerin' The Blues (Stitt)  4:53
17 Stretch Pants (Stitt)  5:13


*

Personnel
[# 1-8] Low Flame (Jazzland JLP971 ; 1962)
Sonny Stitt - as & ts
Don Patterson - org
Paul Weeden - g
Billy James - dr
Recorded in New York ; April 4, 1962
[# 9-17] Feelin's (Roost LPS2247 ; 1962)
Same as above
Recorded in New York ; February/April, 1962

Dave Pell - Jazz Goes Dancing (Prom to Prom)

The Dave Pell Octet, which made its first recordings in 1953, came out of the Les Brown big band and was the epitome of a swinging, cool-toned, West Coast-style jazz group. Pell's ensemble at the time consisted of the leader on tenor, trumpeter Don Fagerquist (an underrated great), trombonist Ray Sims, baritonist Marty Berman, pianist Arnold Ross, guitarist Tony Rizzi, bassist Bob Bates and drummer Irv Kluger. In order to increase his audience, Pell went out of his way to play for dancing audiences without altering his music much. This long-out-of-print LP is an excellent example of Dave Pell's music of the era, with a dozen songs (two originals and ten vintage standards) whose titles have something to do with college-age people or dancing. Examples include "Young and Healthy," "The Continental," "When I Take My Sugar to Tea" and "Walkin' My Baby Back Home." Worth exploring.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/jazz-goes-dancing-prom-to-prom-mw0000245438


Dave Pell
Jazz Goes Dancing/Prom to Prom

Tracks

1 Look Who's Dancing (Schwartz, Fields)  3:19
2 East of the Sun (Browman)  3:06
3 You (Donadson, Adamson)  2:53
4 Young and Healthy (Warren, Dubin)  3:23
5 The Continental (Magidson, Conrad)  2:37
6 Dance for Daddy (Pell)  2:45
7 When I Take My Sugar to Tea (Fain, Kahal, Pierre)  3:01
8 If I Had You (Shapiro, Campbell, Connelly)  2:45
9 Cheek to Cheek (Berlin)  2:56
10 Let's Face the Music and Dance (Berlin)  3:10
11 Prom to Prom (Pell)  2:57
12 Walkin, My Baby Back Home (Turk, Ahlert)  2:59

*

Personnel
Dave Pell - ts
Don Fagerquist - tp
Ray Sims - tb
Marty Berman - bs
Tony Rizzi - g
Arnold Ross - p
Bob Bates - b
Irving Kluger - dr

Recorded in Hollywood, California ; May 28, 31 & June 4, 1956

Dave Pell Octet - Jazz Goes Dancing to Famous Songs

Subtitled "Jazz Goes Dancing" (which was the name of an earlier album), this LP (which was last reissued by the Spanish Fresh Sound label) features the Dave Pell Octet playing a dozen songs written by Harry Warren. The danceable music swings and features fine short solos from the members of the octet, which at the time were trumpeter Jack Sheldon, valve trombonist Bob Enevoldsen, Pell on tenor, baritonist Med Flory, pianist Paul Moer, guitarist Tom Tedesco, bassist Buddy Clark and drummer Mel Lewis. The West Coast all-stars perform arrangements by Marty Paich, Bill Holman, Shorty Rogers, Flory and John Williams to such songs as "You're My Everything," "Forty-Second Street," "Lulu's Back In Town" and "I'll String Along With You."
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:axfwxqrgldke

Dave Pell
Campus Hop
Jazz Goes Dancing to Famous Songs
by
Harry Warren

Tracks

1 Java Junction (Warren)  4:17
2 You're My Everything (Warren, Young, Dixon)  2:49
3 Forty-Second Street (Warren, Dubin)  4:17
4 By the River Sainte Marie (Warren, Leslie)  3:04
5 I Know Why and So Do You (Warren, Gordon)  3:57
6 We're in the Money (Warren, Dubin)  3:32
7 Cheerful Little Earful (Warren, Gershwin, Rose)  3:03
8 Would You Like to Take a Walk (Warren, Dixon, Rose)  4:36
9 Lulu's Back in Town (Warren, Dubin)  3:24
10 I'll String Along with You (Warren, Dubin)  2:35
11 Remember Me (Warren, Dubin)  3:04
12 Summer Night (Warren, Dubin)  3:02

*

Personnel
Jack Sheldon - tp
Bob Enevoldsen - tb
Dave Pell - ts
Med Flory - bs
Tommy Tedesco - g
Paul Moer - p
Buddy Clark - b
Mel Lewis - dr

Recorded in Hollywood ; November 12, 14 & 27, 1957

Sunday, May 28, 2017

Eddy Louiss Trio (feat. René Thomas)

Eddy Louiss is one of the most underrated organists of all time, probably because he has always been based in his native France. This 1991 CD puts the focus on the talented and fairly original organist, whose style falls between Jimmy Smith and Wild Bill Davis. Joined by guitarist René Thomas and drummer Kenny Clarke for a studio set (the only one by this particular trio), Louiss performs two basic originals (including Clarke's "Don't Want Nothin'," awhich uses the "Ja Da" chord changes), Miles Davis' "Nardis," a heated version of "Hot House," Horace Silver's catchy "No Smoking" and "You've Changed." An excellent all-around showcase that serves as a fine introduction to the very viable organist.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:hifyxqujldhe

Eddy Louiss
Trio

Tracks

1 Nardis (Davis)  7:49
2 Blue Tempo (Thomas)  8:04
3 Hot House (Dameron)  7:12
4 No Smokin' (Silver)  6:24
5 You've Changed (Reese)  9:52
6 Don't Want Nothin' (Clarke)  5:36

*

Personnel
Eddy Louiss - org
René Thomas - g
Kenny Clarke - dr

Recorded at Studio Davout, Paris, 1968

Phil Woods - Young Woods


Apart from his Prestige dates during 1956-57, Phil Woods participated as a sideman in several recording sessions for other labels, and three of them have been compiled here on this CD. The first 4 tracks come from an August '57 session headed by pianist Nat Pierce. The quintet sides, with Woods' smoothy flowing alto lines, are equally well integrated sound-wise-and on the septet tracks it's not just two horns plus rhythm, as so often is the case. The arrangements, mostly by George Roumanis, are crisp and the patterns interweave to good musical effect. Phil Woods, for his part, plays with swinging élan, demonstrating a great individuality of conception ans style. A direct, head-on musician who can also "shout" when the occasion demands, he is particularly scintillating on his own composition, "Took the Spook", named after Chan Parker's dog.

Source : http://www.freshsoundrecords.com/record.php?record_id=2959

Phil Woods
Young Woods
 (aka Altoist ! )

Tracks

1 Blues in Pig Alley (Pierce)  3:08
2 Easy Living (Rainger, Robin)  3:06
3 Wailing on the Left Bank (Pierce)  2:48
4 There Will Never Be Another You (Gordon, Warren)  3:12
5 I've Got a Feelin' You're Foolin' (Brown, Freed)  4:26
6 I Hadn't Anyone 'Til You (Noble)  4:58
7 I Got It Bad (And That Ain't Good) (Ellington, Webster)  4:27
8 You're Driving Me Crazy (Donaldson)  4:49
9 Took the Spook (Woods)  4:28
10 Delighted (Salvador)  4:10
11 Carioca (Eliscu, Kahn, Youmans)  3:34


*

Personnel
[# 1-4]
Phil Woods - as
Burt Collins - tp
Nat Pierce - p
Barry Galbraith - g
John Drew - b
Gus Johnson - dr
Recorded in New York Ciry ; August 1957
[# 6-8 & 11]
Phil Woods - as
Sal Salvador - g
Ralph Martin - p
Danny Martucci - b
Joe Morello - dr
Recorded in New York Ciry ;December 1957.
[# 5, 9 & 10]
Phil Woods - as
Eddie Bert - tb
Eddie Costa - vb
Sal Salvador - g
John Williams - p
Sonny Dallas - b
Jimmy Campbell - dr
Recorded in New York Ciry ;January 1957.

Saturday, May 27, 2017

The Complete Pacific Jazz Recordings of the Chico Hamilton Quintet

The original Chico Hamilton Quintet was one of the last significant West Coast jazz bands of the cool era. Consisting of Buddy Collette on reeds (flute, clarinet, alto, and tenor), guitarist Jim Hall, bassist Carson Smith, and the drummer/leader, the most distinctive element in the group's identity was cellist Fred Katz. The band could play quite softly, blending together elements of bop and classical music into their popular sound and occupying their own niche. This six-CD, limited-edition box set from 1997 starts off with a Hamilton drum solo from a 1954 performance with the Gerry Mulligan Quartet ; it contains three full albums and many previously unreleased numbers) by the original Chico Hamilton band and also has quite a few titles from the second Hamilton group (which has Paul Horn and John Pisano in the places of Collette and Hall). In addition, there are three titles from the third Hamilton Quintet (with Eric Dolphy on flute and alto) and a 1959 Duke Ellington tribute date that featured both Collette and Horn. Most of these performances were formerly quite rare and never reissued coherently before. Highly recommended to jazz historians and to listeners who enjoy classic cool jazz, this box is sure to be sold out quickly.
Scott Yanow (All Music)

Source: http://www.allmusic.com/album/the-complete-pacific-jazz-recordings-of-the-chico-hamilton-quintet-mw0000921997

The Complete Pacific Jazz Recordings
of the
Chico Hamilton
Quintet

Tracks

Cd. 1

1 Drums West (Hamilton)  4:19
2 A Nice Day (Collette)  2:55
3 My Funny Valentine (Rodgers, Hart)  4:21
4 Blue Sands (Collette)  6:38
5 The Sage (Katz)  3:37
6 The Morning After (Hamilton)  2:10
7 I Want to Be Happy (Youmans, Caesar)  2:13
8 Spectacular (Hall)  5:19
9 Free Form (Hamilton)  5:05
10 Walking Carson Blues (Smith)  6:15
11 Buddy Boo (Collette)  5:20
12 Gone With the Wind (Magidson, Wrubel)  5:08
13 Topsy (Durham, Battle)  8:24
14 Undecided (Shavers)  9:07

*


Cd. 2

1 My Old Flame (Johnston, Coslow)  4:33
2 The Saint (Hall)  4:31
3 It Don't Mean a Thing If It Ain't Got That Swing (Mills, Ellington)  6:04
4 Stella by Starlight (Washington, Young)  2:40
5 Caravan (Mills, Ellington, Tizol)  6:08
6 Tea for Two (Youmans, Caesar)  5:39
7 Fast Flute (Collette, Hamilton)  6:05
8 Change It (Collette)  2:41
9 Cute Little Deal (Jones)  3:01
10 A Mood (Katz)  3:57
11 This Is Your Day (Collette)  3:58
12 I'll Keep Loving You (Bud Powell)  2:19
13 Crazy Rhythm (Caesar, Meyer, Kahn)  4:17

*
Cd. 3

1 Jonalah (Smith)  2:21
2 Chrissie (Hall)  3:53
3 The Wind (Freeman)  3:38
4 Gone Lover When Your Lover Has Gone (Swan)  3:51
5 The Ghost (Collette)  5:11
6 Sleepy Slept Here (Collette)  4:14
7 Taking a Chance on Love (Duke, Latouche, Fetter)  4:13
8 The Squimp (Katz)  1:53
9 Topsy (Durham, Battle)  4:53
10 Sleep (Burtnett, Geibel)  2:31
11 I Know (Theme) #1 (Hall)  0:58
12 Chanel #5 (Smith)  4:40
13 Beanstalk (Smith)  5:17
14 September Song (Weill, Anderson)  3:36
15 Siete-Cuatro (Hall)  4:54
16 Mr. Jo Jones (Hamilton)  3:15
17 I Know (Theme) #2 (Hall)  0:40
18 Mr. Smith Goes to Town (Smith)  2:52

*


Cd. 4

1 Satin Doll (Ellington, Strayhorn)  4:39
2 Lillian (Katz)  5:10
3 Reflections (Katz)  5:28
4 Soft Winds (Henderson)  4:51
5 Caravan (Mills, Ellington, Tizol)  3:25
6 I Know (Theme) #3 (Hall)  0:41
7 Lord Randall (Katz)  7:32
8 Suite for Horn (Katz)  13:34
a. Allegro
b. Zen
c. Science-Fiction
9 Pluck It (Katz)  2:58
10 Classical (Katz)  2:59
11 Loma (Katz)  3:27
12 Granada (Lara, Musel, Lisbona)  3:54
13 Katz-Up (Smith)  3:51
14 Montuna (Katz)  4:37

*

Cd. 5

1 Lord Randall (Katz)  8:32
2 Walking Carson Blues (Smith)  6:09
3 Folk Lore (Smith)  4:11
4 Lapis Lazuli (Smith)  4:05
5 Concerto Petite (Katz)  8:22
6 Show Me (Lerner)  3:28
7 I'm a Funny Dame (Dubey)  2:38
8 Music to Eat By (Hamilton)  6:30
9 A Wonderful Guy (Rodgers, Hammerstein)  3:15
10 This Nearly Was Mine (Rodgers, Hammerstein)  3:53
11 Dites-moi (Rodgers, Hammerstein)  3:01
12 Some Enchanted Evening (Rodgers, Hammerstein)  3:16

*


Cd. 6

1 Bali Ha'i (Rodgers, Hammerstein)  4:42
2 There Is Nothin' Like a Dame (Rodgers, Hammerstein)  3:03
3 Younger Than Springtime (Rodgers, Hammerstein)  3:31
4 Happy Talk (Rodgers, Hammerstein)  2:59
5 A Cockeyed Optimist (Rodgers, Hammerstein II)  1:53
6 Honey Bun (Rodgers, Hammerstein II)  4:20
7 I'm Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair (Rodgers, Hammerstein II)  2:39
8 In a Sentimental Mood (Mills, Ellington, Kurtz)  2:26
9 I'm Beginning to See the Light (Hodges, James, Ellington, George)  3:03
10 In a Mellow Tone (Ellington, Gabler)  2:25
11 Medley : Take the a Train/Perdido (Strayhorn, Tizol)  3:37
12 Everything But You (James, Ellington, George)  4:32
13 I'm Just a Lucky So and So (Ellington, David)  4:53
14 Azure (Mills, Ellington)  3:32
15 I'm Beginning to See the Light (Hodges, James, Ellington, George)  4:02
16 In a Mellow Tone (Ellington, Gabler)  3:38
17 Just A-Sittin' and A-Rockin' (Ellington, Strayhorn, Gaines )  3:22
18 In a Sentimental Mood (Mills, Ellington, Kurtz)  4:46
19 Day Dream (Ellington, Latouche, Strayhorn)  3:55
20 It Don't Mean a Thing If It Ain't Got That Swing (Mills, Ellington)  4:16

*

Personnel
[Cd. 1, # 1]
Chico Hamilton - dr
Recorded live at Stockton High School, Stockton, California ; November 12, 1954
[Cd. 1, # 2-6]
Buddy Collette - fl, cl, as & ts
Fred Katz - cel
Jim Hall - g
Carson Smith - b
Chico Hamiton - dr
Recorded at Radio Recorders, Los Angeles ; August 23, 1955
[Cd. 1, # 7-11]
Same as above
Recorded live at Strollers, Long Beach, California ; August 4, 1955
[Cd. 1, # 12-14 ; Cd. 2, # 1-4]
Same as above
Recorded same place as above ; August 4 or November 11, 1955
[Cd. 2, # 5-13]
Same as above
Recorded same place as above ; November 11, 1955
[Cd. 3, # 1-5]
Same as above
Recorded in Los Angeles ; January 4, 1956
[Cd. 3, # 6-10]
Same as above
Recorded at Music Box Theatre, Los Angeles ; February 10 & 13, 1956
[Cd. 3, # 11-18 & Cd. 4, # 1-6]
Paul Horn - pcc, fl, cl & as
Fred Katz - cel
John Pisano - g
Carson Smith - b
Chico Hamilton - dr
Recorded at Forum Theatre, Los Angeles ; October 21 & 24, 1956
[Cd. 4, # 7-14]
Same as above, except
Dick Noel, Joe Howard, Herbie Harper - tb
Harry Klee - fl
Willy Schwartz - cl
Julie Jacobs - ob
Marty Beman - bssn, are added [# 8 only]
Recorded in Los Angeles ; November, 1956
[Cd. 5, # 1-5]
Same as above, except
Anahid Ajemian - vl, is added [# 5 only]
Recorded live at Town Hall, New York City ; May 26, 1957
[Cd. 5, # 6 & 7]
Same as above
Recorded in Los Angeles ; August 12, 1957
[Cd. 5, # 8-12 ; & Cd. 6, # 1-7]
Paul Horn - fl, cl & as
Fred Katz - cel
John Pisano - g
Hal Gaylor - b
Chico Hamilton - dr
Recorded in Los Angeles ; January 15, 24, 29 & 30, 1958
[Cd. 6, # 8-10]
Eric Dolphy - fl & as
Nate Gershman - cel
John Pisano - g
Hal Gaylor - b
Chico Hamilton - dr
Recorded in Los Angeles ; circa April 1958
[Cd. 6, # 11-20]
Paul Horn - fl, cl & as
Buddy Collette - fl, as & ts
Fred Katz - cel
Jim Hall - g
Carson Smith - b & arr.
Chico Hamilton - dr
Recorded at Sound Enterprises, Los Angeles ; January 9 & 12, 1959

Gerry Mulligan - California Concerts, vol. 1 & 2 (1954)

When the original Gerry Mulligan quartet broke up, Chet Baker forged his own career with another great quartet that featured Russ Freeman. Mulligan, who had become very attached to the pianoless group idea, put together another quartet with valve trombonist Bob Brookmeyer, which continued intermittently until the early sixties. This seemed an ideal combination since both Mulligan and Brookmeyer were good pianists.This format gave each of them the opportunity to play the instrument, thereby creating two more instrument configurations for the band. By not using a trumpet player, Mulligan also avoided comparisons with his original quartet with Baker.
He did however try the original instrumentation on two occasions. ln late 1954. he briefly led a quartet with Jon Eardley and in 1958, he led another with Art Farmer. The first volume of California Concerts is greatly expanded from the first side of the original Pacific Jazz album and features the quartet of Mulligan, Eardly, Red Mitchell and original quartet drummer Chico Hamilton. The occasion was a concert on November 12, 1954 at Stockton High School in Stockton, California. The merits of the rhythm section are quite evident. Jon Eardly is wonderful surprise for those not familiar with him or those who have not listened to his work with Mulligan in years. A well-rounded and distinctive player, he has a great sense of swing and is a thoughtful, fresh improviser.
The ten tunes of this lengthy CD include all of the releasable material from that concert The first four tunes were issued on the original album. Three others appeared soon thereafter on various Pacific Jazz anthologies. "Makin’ Whoopee", "Darn That Dream"" and Mulligan’s "Ontet", which he originally wrote for his tentette, are previously unissued.
Volume two comes from a concert at Hoover High School in San Diego on December 14 1954. The concert started off with the same quartet. All six pieces by them are previously unissued and presented here for the first time. The remaining nine pieces feature the first appearance of Mulligan’s sextet. Larry Bunker, the second drummer from the original quartet, is on drums and Zoot Sims and Bob Brookmeyer are added. Although Mulligan took six months off from touring and leading a band soon after this concert, he must have liked the results of this evening very much. When he reformed his group in mid 1955, it was a sextet with the same front line. The sextet made several albums for Mercury and lasted until the end of 1956...
Michael Cuscuna, from the booklet

Gerry Mulligan
California Concerts
vol. 1

Tracks

1 Blues Going Up (Mulligan)  5:32
2 Little Girl Blue (Rodgers, Hart)  5:11
3 Piano Blues (Mulligan)  5:45
4 Yardbird Suite (Parker)  6:25
5 Blues for Tiny (Mitchell)  3:35
6 Soft Shoe (Mulligan)  3:46
7 Makin' Whoopee (Kahn, Donaldson)  3:14
9 Ontet (Mulligan)  4:10
10 A Bark for Barksdale (Mulligan)  8:18

*

Personnel
Gerry Mulligan - bs & p
Jon Eardley - tp
Red Mitchell - b
Chico Hamilton - dr

Recorded live at Stockton High School - Stockton, California ; November 12, 1954

*

Gerry Mulligan
California Concerts
vol. 2

Tracks

1 Makin' Whoopee (Donaldson, Kahn)  3:14
2 Nights at the Turntable (Mulligan)  3:06
3 Blues for Tiny (Mitchell)  5:20
4 Frenesi (Dominguez, Whitcup)  3:16
5 Limelight (Mulligan)  3:44
6 People Will Say We're in Love (Hammerstein, Rodgers)  4:04
7 Western Union (Mulligan)  7:16
8 I Know, Don't Know How (Mulligan)  5:28
9 The Red Door (Mulligan, Sims)  7:14
10 Polka Dots and Moon Beams (Burke, VanHeusen)  6:59
11 I'll Remember April (DePaul, Johnston, Raye)  4:20
12 There Will Never Be Another You (Gordon, Warren)  5:37
13 It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing) (Ellington, Mills)  3:50
14 Medley
In a Sentimental Mood
Flamingo/Moon Mist (Anderson, Ellington, Grouya, Mercer) 5:50

*

Personnel
Gerry Mulligan - bs
Jon Eardley - tp
Bobby Brookmeyer - tb & p [# 6-14]
Zoot Sims - ts [# 6-14]
Red Mitchell - b
Chico Hamilton - dr [# 1-5]
Larry Bunker - dr [# 6-14]

Recorded at Hoover High School, San Diego, California ; December 14, 1954

Friday, May 26, 2017

Project G-5 - Tribute to Wes Montgomery

The year I993 marked the 25th anniversary of Wes Montgomery’s death in his birth place in Indianapolis, Indiana. It is a stroke of appropriateness that guitarist Royce Campbell carried out his wish to pay homage to Montgomery with this third of a series of tribute recordings. Reams of words have been written about Montgomery’s unparalleled assets as jazz history’s most significant guitarist since Charlie Christian. His powerful rhythmic drive and fire, and flawlessly sculpted phrases invested with originality and imagination, contributed to his uniqueness. Moreover, the remarkable use of his thumb in place of a pick on the right hand literally liberated his fingers to complete his classic three-phase approach, juxtaposing choruses — first, a single note line, followed by riff passages played in octaves and, lastly, chordal passages. He achieved results which identified his distinctive sound and in essence opened up a new universe of fresh options in the guitar world. In sum, he ignited and continues to fuel the creative burners and lexicon of guitarists of unbounded genres. Montgomery commented to Max jones of Melody Maker magazine : “The method and technique that identify me were born out of limitations. We all have them and must accept and build something meaningful out of them. What I do might not be right technically, but the music comes out all the same. Why ? Because I had to play to tell my story.” His unorthodox tact was clearly a means to fulfill the need to express his own musical messages. As jazz guitar educator Adrian Ingram says, “What Wes did was to develop a germ of an idea into an entire new concept of guitar playing... he developed octave playing in a new way to create interest, and to add drama and tension to his improvisation..."
DR. Herb Wong, The Jazz Review, Jazz Educators Journal, KJAZ Radio, San Fancisco, from the booklet

Project G-5
Tribute to Wes Montgomery

Tracks

1 Wes (Campbell)  6:11
2 Days of Wine and Roses (Mancini, Mercer)  7:07
3 Four on Six (Montgomery)  3:41
4 Darn That Dream (De Lange, Van Heusen)  5:26
5 Besame Mucho (Skylar, Velazquez)  7:22
6 Gone With the Wind (Magidson, Wrubel)  6:47
7 West Coast Blues (Montgomery)  4:15
8 Yesterdays (Arkeen, Harbach, James, Johnson, Kern )  6:00
9 Body and Soul (Eyton, Green, Heyman, Sour)  3:06
10 The End of a Love Affair (Redding)  4:09
11 Naptown Blues (Montgomery)  9:02

*

Personnel
Tal Farlow - g [# 3 & 11]
Herb Ellis - g [# 2, 6 & 11]
Jimmy Raney - g [# 1, 7, 8 & 10]
Cal Collins - g [# 2, 4 & 11]
Royce Campbell - g [# 1, 3, 5, 8, 9 & 11]
Mel Rhyne - org [# 1, 5, 7 8 & 10]
John Clayton Jr. - b
John von Ohlen - dr

Recorded at LRS Studios, Cicinnati, April 6, 1992 [# 1, 5, 7 8 & 10] ; & September Recording Studio, Indianapolis ; May 4, 1992 [other selectiosn]

Herb Ellis - Midnight Roll (Complete Sessions)

Herb Ellis is known primarily for playing with small ensembles, so this recording as part of an octet is a departure for the great guitarist. This "all-star" combo includes trumpeter Roy Eldridge in a sublimated role, while tenor saxophonist Buddy Tate is featured a bit more, and pianist Ray Bryant solidifies the nucleus of a very talented band of old pros and unsung heroes. The fare is split between standards, originals, and favorites, including Duke Ellington's rousing "It Don't Mean a Thing" with the jamming Eldridge leading the charge. The classic "Gravy Waltz" of Ray Brown is done here, as Bryant's deft chords with the sax and trumpets form a strolling, impenetrable front line — one of the very best, fully formed and realized versions of this great song. Ellis contributed the folkish "Poor Darlin' Nellie," derived from the story of banished African-American slave Nellie Gray, a light rural swing with no horns save Assunto's muted trumpet solo. "Roy Showed" is a bouncy bop blues punctuated by Tate's tenor as Ellis further accents with sharp strumming chords. Everybody plays together in sweet agreement on "Broadway," a stock jam tune that shows the band has no issues with grandstanding, egos, or finding enough space to play. The band strips down to a trio on the pristine ballad "Willow Weep for Me" and Tate presents a spare, spacious melody line during "It Makes No Difference Now." The balance of this group should duly receive high marks (especially since it was a one-shot). EU-only release containing the complete sessions from the outstanding album The Midnight Roll, featuring two All-Star small group formations. Included are Roy Eldridge or Dukes of Dixieland's Frank Assunto on trumpet, Buddy Tate on tenor sax, Ray Bryant on piano, and on some tracks, the ill-fated bassist Israel Crosby, who is best known for his work with the Ahmad Jamal Trio. Crosby died of a heart attack on August 11, 1962, less than two months after recording this date. All existing tracks from the sessions that were not included on the original LP have been added here as a bonus, as well as an earlier version of 'Gravy Waltz' taped by Ellis in a quartet format the previous year.

 Source : http://www.cduniverse.com/productinfo.asp?pid=8965216&style=music&fulldesc=T

Herb Ellis
The Midnight Roll
(Complete Sessions)

Tracks

1 Broadway (Bird, McRae, Woode)  4:20
2 Gravy Waltz (Brown)  3:09
3 Poor Darlin’ Nellie (Ellis)  3:43
4 Old Folks (Hill, Robison)  3:35
5 Roy Showed (Ellis)  4:48
6 Things Ain’t What They Used To Be (Ellington, Parsons)  3:59
7 Willow Weep For Me (Ronell)  3:57
8 Symphony (Alstone)  3:23
9 It Make No Difference Now (Davis, Tillman)  4:02
10 It Don’t Mean A Thing (Ellington, Mills)  5:58
11 Harper’s Ferry [John Brown’s Body]* (Trad.)  5:08
12 Herb’s Here* (Ellis)  4:57
13 I Won’t Love You* (Unknown)  8:16
14 You’d Better Know It* (Unknown)  4:52
15 Too Bad* (Ellis, Assunto)  3:45
16 Alicia* (Ellis, Herbert)  4:40
17 Gravy Waltz [1961 Quartet Version] (Brown)  5:08

* From the same sessions, but not included on the original LP.

*

Personnel
[# 3-4, 6-9 & 11-15]
Frank Assunto - tp
Buddy Tate - ts
Ray Bryant - p
Herb Ellis - g
Jimmy Rowser - b
Gus Johnson - dr
Recorded in New York ; June 12 & 13, 1962.
[# 1-2, 5, 10 & 16]
Roy Eldridge - tp
Buddy Tate - ts
Ray Bryant - p
Herb Ellis - g
Israel Crosby - b
Gus Johnson - dr
Recorded in New York ; June 14, 1962
[# 17] Bonus Track
Victor Feldman - vb
Herb Ellis - g
Leroy Vinnegar - b
Ronnie Zito - dr
Recorded in Los Angeles ; October 12, 1961.

Jim Hall - Grand Slam

Unlike many all-star groups Grand Slam succeeds — they are more than just a jam band. They play a repertoire (Hall and Lovano tunes) suited to this band. They sound rehearsed, and they interact with each other. There is no sense of "I'll coast while you do your thing, and you get of my way when I'm up."
Sonically Grand Slam recalls the early 60's Sonny Rollins band, The Bridge, in which Hall also played, but this band plays more adventurous music and is more together as a unit. Hall has evolved, and Nash and Mraz are simply better, more sympathetic musicians than their predecessors. Like Rollins Lovano tends to get it going without a piano feeding him chords. Hall sometimes plays that role, but more often he comments or accents behind Lovano, plays counterpoint, or plays in unison. He simulates a steel pan sound in the accompaniment to "Say Hello to Calypso." And he leaves space.
As he has over the last 15 years Hall continues to grow. He explores his instrument more fully. His solos are unpredictable, advanced rhythmically, in the moment, and full of interesting ideas — they are truly spontaneous compositions. Lovano, an effective complement to Hall, improvises with an earthier, but equally musical feel. He plays 4 different reed instruments with tenor as his most expressive voice. His alto (Conn low B) is not overly distinguishable from his tenor aurally, but he approaches the instruments dissimilarly. He is more grounded and plays with more depth on tenor while his alto lines tend to feel more "experimental"—there is a sense of Eric Dolphy's yearning for one thing.
Mraz and Nash take occasional worthy solos (Nash's intro on "Blackwell's Message" is particularly apt.), but they realize their potentials creatively as accompanists and as equal participants in the ensemble.
The compositions are strong, varied pieces that reveal the many sides of this uncompromising group.
Craig Jolley

Source : http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=6638#.UfeL1G1Y0n4

Jim Hall
Grand Slam
Live at the Regattabar

Tracks

1 Slam (Hall)  12:27
2 Chelsea Rendez-vous (Lovano)  7:02
3 Border Crossing (Hall)  6:25
4 Say Hello to Calypso (Hall)  6:47
5 Blackwell's Message (Lovano)  11:06
6 All Across the City (Hall)  9:47
7 Feel Free (Lovano)  6:37

*

Personnel
Jim Hall - g
Joe Lovano - ts, as & cl
George Mraz - b
Lewis Nash - dr

Recorded at the Regattabar, The Charles Hotel, Cambridge, Massachusetts ; January 20-22, 2000

Take a look here
http://inconstantsol.blogspot.fr/2010/03/jim-hall-joe-lovano-grand-slam-live-in.html