Wednesday, September 17, 2064

Sunday, November 19, 2017

Barney Kessel - Soaring

I love the sound of a jazz guitar. But what I enjoy most aren't the melody lines, although who can deny the joy of a great guitar solo. Instead, I'm a nut for the sound of swinging guitar chords and harmonic voicings. The thicker and meatier the chords played the better, and the more of them the merrier. If you share my passion for this full guitar sound, an album that will knock you out is Barney Kessel's Soaring.
Recorded in 1976 for Concord, Soaring features Kessel on guitar, Monty Budwig on bass and Jake Hanna on drums. Kessel was among the most prolific jazz guitarists, recording on more than 500 known jazz sessions. This staggering career number does not even include all of his many credit-less studio dates for pop and rock singles and albums, or his relentless TV and movie soundtrack work.
A large chunk of Kessel's jazz recordings in the 1950s featured him as a tasty accompanist or as a leader surrounded by other West Coast giants. In the 1960s, Kessel frequently recorded jazzy pop albums that required a heavy dose of melody work to illustrate the Broadway or movie themes being covered. By contrast, on Soaring, Kessel was freed from such distractions and conformity, allowing him to stretch out as he pleased.
On Soaring, Kessel chose to place an emphasis on his chord technique for the six standards and two originals. Think block-chord piano marvel Milt Buckner — but on guitar — and you get the picture here. Kessel here is at the absolute top of his game. There are no studio gimmicks or commercial trappings, just gorgeous, hard-swinging jazz-chord playing. The result is an album that dismisses all notions that Kessel was merely a sugary studio genius who lacked a burning drive. Here, it's all drive.
The tracks You Go to My Head and Get Out of Town are taken at an uptempo pace and raise hairs. Not only is Kessel's chord technique magnificent, his taste and ability to hear what he wanted seconds before he delivered it on the guitar fretboard is amazing.
Star Eyes and I Love You are rollicking swingers that showcase Kessel's ability to keep sensational time, develop innovative musical knots and escape from them deftly. He seems to go out of his way on both tracks to throw himself into musical trouble and resolve tricky passages with beautiful escape chords.
The other two standards, Someone in Love and Beautiful Love, are gentle, mid-tempo renditions that express sensitivity through waves of caressing chords.
The two originals on the album are soft, introspective pieces. Seagull is the album's only pure ballad. But a slower pace only means more time to absorb Kessel's technique in slow motion. You're the One for Me is a delicate bossa nova that features the nimble Jake Hanna on brushes.
This is one of those perfect recordings, with daring chords and spirited melody-line bursts that only lead back to more Kessel chords. Which is how we jazz guitar lovers like it. This album is a must-own.
JAZZWAX, MARC MYERS

Source : http://news.allaboutjazz.com/news.php?id=50856#.UgiyRG1Y0n4

Barney Kessel
Soaring

Tracks

1 You Go to My Head (Coots, Gillespie)  4:27
2 Get Out of Town (Porter)  4:55
3 Seagull (Kessel)  6:12
4 Like Someone in Love (Burke, VanHeusen)  6:59
5 You're the One for Me (Kessel)  4:50
6 Beautiful Love (Gillespie, King, VanAlstyne ...)  6:34
7 Stary Eyes (DePaul, Raye)  4:24
8 I Love You (Porter)  5:27

*

Personnel
Barney Kessel - g
Monty Budwig - b
Jake Hanna - dr


Recorded and remixed at Coast Recorders San Francisco, California ; 1976 ?

Friday, November 17, 2017

Sonny Clark - Art of the Trio

Although today his playing is revered among many jazz circles, Sonny Clark never achieved fame during his lifetime, due to the fact that, like so many talented jazzmen, he died very young, at the tender age of 31. Jazz critic Bob Blumenthal commented that : “Had it not been for liner notes to his Blue Note and Time albums, not a word might have been written about Sonny Clark in his lifetime, although British critics have recently included Clark’s Leapin' and Lopin' in a list of essential modern jazz recordings. Art Farmer, a frequent session mate of Clark’s who brought his still-eloquent flugelhorn into Sandy’s last week, seemed to capture the consensus view when he said ‘Sonny Clark was a nice musician... l’m not going to say he was fantastic or anything, l’ll just say he was nice.’ This listener, who never had the chance to hear Clark in person but has long familiarity with his recorded work, would like to dissent. At the least, Clark was a supremely reliable session man who invariably lifted a rhythm section with his tensile comping and infectious solos. But l would argue that Clark was something more. A master of the most subtle jazz arts, he deserves to be considered one of the premier players of the style commonly known as hard bop — only in Clark’s case post-bop is the more appropriate term, as his playing was never hard. Most of tre activity in a Sonny Clark piano solo occurs below the melodic surface, for if many of the icks he employed appear recognizable, the way in which he dealt with those licks was beyond reproach. Above all else, Clark seemed to define rhythmic agility, especially that manner of slightly-behind-the-beat articulation so common among modern jazzmen.”
Conrad Yeatis Clark (nicknamed Sonny) was born in Herminie, Philadelphia, on July 21, 1931. Beginning in 1953, and lasting the better part of a decade, he played and recorded prolifically in various settings, backing such figures as John Coltrane, the Turrentine brothers, Donald Byrd, Blue Mitchell, Tommy Flanagan, lke Quebec, and many more. Although almost all of his sessions were interesting in some way, his personal style is more clearly appreciated on these trio sides. The first nine tracks were recorded in 1957 and issued on the Blue Note LP Sonny Clark (BST 81579). They are described in detail by Leonard Feather in the original liner notes transcribed below. A year passed before the next trio studio sessions, which produced fourteen amazing tracks, consisting exclusively of versions of well-known jazz standards. This music, however, wasn’t issued in its entirety for a long time, and only appeared first as singles.
ln contrast to the material of those sessions. Sonny Clark’s final trio recordings, taped more than a year later (in March, 1960, for the Time label, and included here as a bonus), consisted solely of his own original compositions...
Aaron Lime (2015), from the booklet

Sonny Clark
The Art of the Trio

Tracks

Cd. 1

1 Bebop (Gillespie)  9:56
2 I Didn't Know What Time it Was (Rodgers, Hart)  4:24
3 Two Bass Hit (Lewis, Gillespie)  3:47
4 Tadd's Delight (Dameron)  6:04
5 Softly, as in a Morning Sunrise (Romberg, Hammerstein II)  6:35
6 I'll Remember April (Raye, DePaul, Johnston)  4:57
7 I Didn't Know What Time it Was [alt.take] (Rodgers, Hart)  4:22
8 Two Bass Hit [alt. take] (Lewis, Gillespie)  4:03
9 Tadd's Delight [alt. take] (Dameron)  5:03
10 Blues in the Night (Mercer, Arlen)  5:58
11 Can't We be Friends (James, Swift)  4:21
12 Somebody Loves Me (DeSylva, Gershwin, MacDonald)  4:19
13 All of You (Porter)  3:58
14 Dancing in the Dark (Dietz, Schwartz)  3:33
15 I Cover the Waterfront (Green, Heyman)  4:41

*


Cd. 2

1 Blues in the Night [alt. take] (Mercer, Arlen)  7:18
2 Gee Baby, Ain't I Good to You (Razaf, Redman)  4:03
3 Ain't No Use (Kirkland, Wyche)  4:51
4 I Can't Give You Anything but Love (McHugh, Fields)  3:54
5 Black Velvet (Jacquet, Mundy)  3:25
6 I'm Just A Lucky So And So (Ellington, David)  4:35
7 The Breeze and I (Camarata, Lecuona, Stillman)  4:02
8 Gee Baby, Ain't I Good to You [alt. take] (Razaf, Redman)  3:51
9 Minor Meeting (Clark)  3:48
10 Nica (Clark)  6:15
11 Sonny's Crib (Clark)  6:20
12 Blues Mambo (Clark)  5:00
13 Blues Blue (Clark)  4:23
14 Junka (Clark)  6:10
15 My Conception (Clark)  4:29
16 Sonia (Clark)  5:09

*

Personnel
[Cd. 1, # 1-9]
Sonny Clark - p
Paul Chambers - b
Philly Joe Jones - dr
Recorded in New York ; October 13, 1957
[Cd. 1, # 10-15 ; Cd. 2, # 1]
Same as above, except
Wes Landers - dr, replaces Jones
Recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey ; December 7, 1958
[Cd. 2, # 2-8]
Same as above, except
Jymie Merritt - b, replaces Chambers
Recorded same place as above ; November 16, 1958
[Cd. 2, # 9-16]
Sonny Clark - p
George Duvivier - b
Max Roach - dr
Recorded in New York ; March 23, 1960

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Clare Fischer - First Time Out

An amazing debut from pianist Clare Fischer — an artist who went onto have a subtle, but immediate influence upon both the American and Brazilian jazz scenes of the time ! Fischer's got a lyrical approach to rhythm that's simply amazing — modern, but never cold and academic — and instead always freely dancing around, in a way that gives equal melodic roles to the bass and drums in his trio. There's a clear bossa nova inspiration here, but keep in mind that Fischer's sensibility was also a big influence on the bossa players of the time. The whole session sparkles with a fresh genius that still beats the work of most players still recording today — and Fischer's piano is accompanied by equally free-thinking work on bass by Gary Peacock and drums by Gene Stone. Most titles are originals...
© 1996-2017, Dusty Groove, Inc.

Source : https://www.dustygroove.com/item/392073

Clare Fischer
First Time Out

Tracks

1 Nigerian Walk (Shaughnessy)  7:07
2 Toddler (Fischer)  4:39
3 Stranger (Peacock)  4:01
4 Afterfect (Fischer)  4:07
5 Free too Long (Fischer)  7:30
6 Piece for Scotty (Fischer)  3:13
7 Blues for Home (Fischer)  5:09
8 I Love You (Porter)  5:15

*

Personnel
Clare Fischer - p
Gary Peacock - b
Gene Stone - dr

Recorded at Pacific Jazz Studios, Hollywood, California ; April 12 & 14, 1962

Barney Kessel's Swingin' Party at Contemporary

Swingin’ Party was recorded at Contemporary’s studio in from of a live audience (one can only wonder, given how many sessions were recorded there at this time, who might have been present). The reason for this is obvious ; the setting combines the energy and spontaneity of a live performance with the pristine sound of the studio. Kessel’s style, as always, is a potpourri of bent notes and pull-offs, all cleanly articulated and full of unexpected phrases. Like a gracious host, Kessel lets the others have a turn in the spotlight as well; surprisingly, Peacock shows little of the abstract plucking that would later become his defining trait. The first few tracks are adequate runs through standards ; however, the quartet gets more adventurous on the second half, which features “Now’s the Time” recast in a minor key, the soulful punch of “Miss Memphis”, and the Latin and Middle Eastern tinged “New Rhumba”. Kessel’s trio recordings are still his most compelling work, but Swingin’ Party works hard to live up to its name.
David Rickert

Source : https://www.allaboutjazz.com/barney-kessels-swingin-party-at-contemporary-barney-kessel-fantasy-jazz-review-by-david-rickert.php

Barney Kessel
Swingin' Party at Contemporary

Tracks

1 Bluesology (Jackson)  9:17
2 Lover Man (Davis, Ramirez, Sherman)  4:53
3 Joy Spring (Brown)  6:50
4 Now's the Time (Parker)  8:20
5 Miss Memphis (Jenkins)  6:29
6 New Rhumba (Jamal)  7:13

*

Personnel
Barney Kessel - g
Marvin Jenkins - p & fl
Gary Peacock - b
Ron Lundberg - dr

Recorded at Contemporary's Studio, Los Angeles ; July 19, 1960

Edmond Hall - Chronological Classics (1944-1945)

What you have here is a veritable audio lexicon of Edmond Hall's style and musical personality. From the first few bars of "It's Been So Long," the clarinetist conjures a disarming atmosphere of warmth and reassurance. The effect is quadrupled as Harry Carney enters, puffing away at his baritone saxophone. The entire Swingtet was in perfect form on May 5, 1944, and the recordings they made on that day are among the very best from Blue Note's first decade. Benny Morton's temperament was perfectly suited for the task of interacting with the other two horns. Their rhythm section was strong enough to provide unflinching support, even when Carney's baritone bellowed and chortled during "Steamin' and Beamin'." The Blue Note date is perfectly complemented by eight magnificent Commodore sides cut during the summer of 1944 in the company of Teddy Wilson. Hall is alternately gentle or briskly bracing. "Caravan" is a wild ride you'll not want to miss. The Swing Sextet session of December 4, 1944, begins with "Opus 15," a slightly modern set of vamps composed by the pianist Ellis Larkins. "Mouse" Randolph does some fine growling through his trumpet and the band runs it down with measured ease. Hall weaves a 45-second introduction to "The Sheik of Araby" before the guys cut loose with it. Four additional sides were cut by practically the same band on some unspecified day in 1945. Larkins contributed another very hip original called "Ellis Island," Hall dreamed up a feisty "Continental Blues," and Randolph shone during a second realization of his own creation, which he simply titled "Face." It sounds like something Lester Young would have enjoyed coasting through. This CD would bear up well under highway driving conditions, even heard twice or thrice through. Every consecutive track is pure pleasure.

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/1944-1945-mw0000237136

Edmond Hall
Chronological Classics
(1944-1945)

Tracks

1 It's Been So Long (Donaldson)  3:09
2 I Can't Believe That You're in Love With Me (Gaskill, McHugh)  3:03
3 Big City Blues (Hall)  4:14
4 Steamin' and Beamin' (Hall)  3:51
5 Sleepy Time Gal (Alden, B. Egan, Lorenzo, A. Whiting)  3:14
6 Where or When (Hart, Rodgers)  3:20
7 It Had to Be You (Jones, Kahn)  3:00
8 Caravan (Ellington, Mills, Tizol)  3:14
9 A Shanty in Old Shanty Town (Little, Siras, Young)  2:43
10 Night and Day (Porter)  2:54
11 I Want to Be Happy (Caesar, Youmans)  3:19
12 Show Piece (Hall, Wilson)  3:39
13 Opus 15 (Larkins)  2:32
14 The Sheik of Araby (Smith, Snyder, Wheeler)  2:34
15 Night and Day (Porter)  2:05
16 The Man I Love (Gershwin, Gershwin)  3:09
17 Face (Hall)  2:36
18 I Want to Be Happy (Caesar, Youmans)  1:42
19 Rompin' in 44 (Hall)  2:11
20 Caravan (Ellington, Mills, Tizol)  2:31
21 Besame Mucho (Skylar, Velázquez)  2:41
22 Ellis Island (Larkins)  3:03
23 Continental Blues (Hall)  3:03
24 Lonely Moments (Williams)  2:55
25 Face (Hall)  3:04

*

Personnel
[# 1-4] Edmond Hall's Swingtet
Benny Morton - tb
Edmond Hall - cl
Harry Carney - bs
Don Frye - p
Everett Barksdale - g
Alvin Raglin - b
Sidney Catlett - dr
Recorded in New York ; May 5, 1944
[# 5-8] Edmond Hall & His Quartet with Teddy Wilson
Edmond Hall - cl
Teddy Wilson - p
Billy Taylor - b
Arthur Trappier - dr
Recorded in New York ; July 11, 1944
 [# 9-12] Edmond Hall & His Quartet with Teddy Wilson
Same as above
Recorded in New York ; July 20, 1944
[# 13-21] Edmond Hall & His Swing Sextet
Irving 'Mouse' Randolph - tp
Henderson C. Chambers - tb
Edmond Hall - cl
Ellis Larkins - p
Johnny Williams - b
Arthur Trappier - dr
Recorded in New York ; December 4, 1944
[# 22-25] Edmond Hall & His Café Society Orchestra
Same as above, except
James Crawford - dr, replaces Trappier
Recorded in New York ; 1945

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

John Lewis & Sacha Distel in Paris

It was in Paris that John Lewis co-led this 1956 date with Sacha Distel, a French guitarist who never became well-known in the U.S. but commanded a lot of respect in French jazz circles. The same can be said about the other French players employed on Afternoon in Paris — neither tenor saxophonist Barney Wilen nor bassist Pierre Michelot were huge names in the U.S., although both were well-known in European jazz circles. With Lewis on piano, Distel on guitar, Wilen on tenor, Michelot or Percy Heath on bass, and Kenny Clarke or Connie Kay on drums, the part-American, part-French group of improvisers provides an above-average bop album that ranges from "Willow Weep for Me," "All The Things You Are," and "I Cover the Waterfront" to Milt Jackson's "Bags' Groove" and Lewis' title song. The big-toned Wilen was only 19 when Afternoon in Paris was recorded, but as his lyrical yet hard-swinging solos demonstrate, he matured quickly as a saxman. It should be noted that all of the Americans on this album had been members of the Modern Jazz Quartet; the only MJQ member who isn't on board is vibist Jackson. Originally released by Atlantic, Afternoon in Paris was finally reissued on CD in 1999 after being out of print for many years.
Alex Henderson

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/afternoon-in-paris-mw0000246233

John Lewis
Sacha Distel
Afternoon in Paris
(AMCY-1160)

Tracks

1 I Cover the Waterfront (Green, Heyman)  6:51
2 Dear Old Stockholm (Traditional)  6:07
3 Afternoon in Paris (Lewis)  9:23
4 All the Things You Are (Hammerstein, Kern)  5:16
5 Bags Groove (Jackson)  6:12
6 Willow Weep for Me (Ronell)  9:31

*

Personnel
John Lewis - p
Sacha Distel - g
Barney Willen - ts
Pierre Michelot or Percy Heath [# 4-6] - b
Connie Kay or Kenny Clarke [# 4-6] - dr

Recorded in Paris ; December 4 & 7, 1956

Teddy Wilson - Chronological Classics (1942-1945)

From 1940 to 1944, Teddy Wilson fronted a sextet that included a number of oustanding musicians. This unit played mainly at both branches of Café Society, but did also undertake some occasional touring. Despite its fine reputation, this Wilson sextet had only few recording oportunities, not least because of the recording ban imposed by the Musician's Union in July 1942.
This volume of the recordings of Teddy Wilson, presented in chronological order, opens with an immaculate solo on the perenial standard "These Foolish Things". Of the following sextet session, only "You're my Favorite Memory" was issued at the time. Throughout 1943 and 1944, Wilson fronted his sextet, which, despite several changes in personnel, always maintained a high musical standard, as the occasional recordings from this period well illustrate. "How high the Moon" and "Russian Lullaby" were issued on one of the earliest V-Discs for the U.S. Army in October 1943. The second V-Disc actually issued featured Wilson's working combo, with Red Norvo as an added attraction. By October 1944, Teddy had given up his own band and rejoined his former employer, Benny Goodman. Besides recording with Benny, Teddy also made a series of fine sides for the Musicraft label, which had just inaugurated a series of fine jazz records. The label's owner, Albert Marx, was married to singer Helen Ward, who may have been the one to bring Teddy to his attention. Both quintet sessions rely on musicians from the Goodman band, plus trumpeter Charlie Shavers. Musically, the four sides by the sextet with Buck Clayton and Ben Webster prove superior. Clayton, then still with the U.S. Army, and free-lancing Ben Webster turn in some magnificient solos. The hot "Savoy" and Wilson's own "Blues Too" rank among the very best cuts on this CD, which includes numerous fine but little-known recordings by the incomparable Teddy Wilson. To be continued...
Anatol Schenker, August 1996, from the booklet

Teddy Wilson
Chronological Classics
(1942-1945)

Tracks

1 These Foolish Things (Marvell, Strachey)  3:02
2 You're My Favorite Memory (Wilson, Johnson)  3:17
3 B Flat Swing (Wilson)  2:55
4 How High The Moon (Lewis, Hamilton)  4:24
5 Russian Lullaby (Berlin)  4:53
6 I Know That You Know (Youmans, O'Dea, Harbach)  2:41
7 Blues (unknown)  2:44
8 Stompin' At The Savoy (Goodman, Webb, Sampson)  2:27
9 Undecided (Robin, Shavers)  2:31
10 China Boy (Winfree, Boutelje)  2:16
11 Every Time We Say Goodbye (Porter)  3:07
12 Just You, Just Me (Greer, Klages)  3:02
13 Just For You Blues (Wilson)  3:19
14 This Heart Of Mine (Freed, Warren)  3:09
15 Bugle Call Rag (Schoebel, Meyers, Pettis)  2:51
16 Runnin' Wild (Gibbs, Grey, Wood)  2:59
17 I Surrender Dear (Clifford, Barris)  2:45
18 Memories Of You (Blake, Razaf)  3:03
19 If Dreams Come True (Mills, Sampson, Goodman)  3:00
20 I Can't Get Started (Gershwin, Duke)  3:08
21 Stompin' At The Savoy (Goodman, Webb, Sampson)  2:40
22 Blues Too (Wilson)  3:08

*

Personnel
[# 1 & 6*] Teddy Wilson Solo
Teddy Wilson - p
Recorded in New York ; January 21, 1942 ; & March 1944*
[# 2 & 3] Teddy Wilson and his Orchestra
Emmett Berry - tp
Benny Morton - tb
Edmond Hall - cl
Teddy Wilson - p
Johnny Williams - b
J.C. Heard - dr
Helen Ward - vc
Recorded in New York ; July 31, 1942
[# 4 & 5]
Joe Thomas - tp
Benny Morton - tb
Edmond Hall - cl
Teddy Wilson - p
Johnny Williams - b
Sidney Catlett - dr
Recorded in New York ; August 13, 1943
[# 7-9]
Charlie Shaves - tp
Teddy Wilson - p
Red Norvo - vb
Remo Palmieri - g
Al Hall - b
Gordon "Specs" Powell - dr
Recorded in New York ; circa November, 1944
[# 10-12]
Charlie Shaves - tp
Teddy Wilson - p
Red Norvo - vb
Billy Taylor - b
Morey Feld - dr
Maxine Sullivan - vc
Recorded in New York ; December 18, 1944
[# 13-17]
Charlie Shaves - tp
Teddy Wilson - p
Red Norvo - vb
Al Hall - b
Gordon "Specs" Powell - dr
Maxine Sullivan - vc
Recorded in New York ; January 15, 1945
[# 18-21]
Buck Clayton - tp
Ben Webster - ts
Teddy Wilson - p
Al Casey - g
Al Hall - b
J.C. Heard - dr
Recorded in New York ; August 14, 1945

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Artie Shaw & His Gramercy Five

The already popular quintet formation seems fond of naming itself as a "Five" of one sort or another — notes, chambers, Americans, guys named Moe, fakers, gravediggers, primaries, after hours and much more than five more. With all of that there is nonetheless only one distinct use of the Gramercy Five combo name. That was by famous swing bandleader and clarinetist Artie Shaw, who utilized the moniker to represent different small groupings through more than a dozen years of his career. Like everything Shaw was involved in including his career itself as well as his marriages, the existence of the group was strictly an off and on again thing. This resulted in many changes in lineup, but Shaw's considerable fame, status, and pocketbook meant that when he was ready to hire new members they would be comers.
Jazz buffs can drop some serious names in relationship to Shaw's sidemen in versions of the Gramercy Five. On electric guitar alone he managed to seat Barney Kessel, Tal Farlow and Joe Puma at various times. There are other reasons why the band is significant to the history of the genre, however. Shaw pioneered use of the small group as a band-within-a-band during big band programs, which like similar ventures by rival Benny Goodman, upped the spectacular ante of jazz, including the importance of exciting soloists. The Gramercy Five is also one of the few examples of the harpsichord being used in jazz. Pianist Johnny Guarnieri made this move in 1940 at work with the first version of the group to be recorded. The harpsichord was another of Shaw's generous references to classical music, also including use of a string quartet four years previously. By adding in electric guitar, Shaw can be seen as a visionary in art pop circles, providing they can get their eyes focused.
Trivia buffs may succeed in piling up further monumental evidence of the Gramercy Five's individuality. It is true that it represents one of the only examples of a group named after a New York telephone exchange. When presented as the Artie Shaw Gramercy Five, as it often is, it is also a rare example of the numerical representation of a band not actually including the leader. With Shaw out front blowing, the number of musicians actually featured was six, not five. The Dave Clark Five, on the other hand, featured leader Dave Clark as one of five guys onstage.
Gramercy Five sides such as "Concerto for Clarinet," "Summit Ridge Drive" and "Special Delivery Stomp" were extremely popular, extending well beyond the noses of trivia hounds. Subsequent reissue action involving the Shaw discography has also extended something, that being the life of the Gramercy Five itself. While never together as long as Goodman's similarly popular small combos, the Gramercy Five was held in such esteem that any of Shaw's small group recordings tend to be passed off as Gramercy Five performances whether then name was in play or not. Shaw did start-up a very short-lived new Gramercy Five in 1953, however, which he quickly abandoned to try dairy farming again in Skekomeko, NY.
Eugene Chadbourne

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/artist/artie-shaw-his-gramercy-five-mn0001905729/biography

Artie Shaw
&
His Gramercy Five
Six Star Treats
The Complete Commercially Released Recordings
(1940-1954)

Tracks

Cd. 1

1 Special Delivery Stomp (Shaw)  2:48
2 Summit Ridge Drive (Shaw)  3:26
3 Keepin' Myself for You (Youmans, Clare)  3:16
4 Cross Your Heart (Gensler, DeSylva)  2:39
5 Dr. Livingstone, I Presume (Shaw)  3:24
6 When the Quail Come Back to San Quentin (Shaw)  3:18
7 My Blue Heaven (Donaldson, Whiting)  2:52
8 Smoke Gets in Your Eyes (Kern, Harbach)  3:17
9 Dr. Livingstone, I Presume (Shaw)  4:00
10 The Grabtown Grapple (Shaw, Harding)  2:56
11 The Sad Sack (Shaw, Harding)  3:04
12 The Sad Sack (Shaw, Harding)  3:30
[broadcast, Philco Radio Hall of Fame]
 13 The Grabtown Grapple (Shaw, Harding)  2:45
[broadcast, Philco Radio Hall of Fame]
 14 I Was Doing All Right (Gershwin, Gershwin)  3:43
[broadcast, Philco Radio Hall of Fame]
 15 You Took Advantage of Me (Rodgers, Hart)  2:58
[broadcast, Philco Radio Hall of Fame]
 16 Scuttlebutt (Shaw)  3:10
17 The Gentle Grifter (Shaw, Carleton)  2:49
18 Mysterioso (Shaw, Carleton)  3:00
19 Mysterioso (Shaw, Carleton)  3:00
20 Hop, Skip and Jump (Shaw, Carleton)  2:57
21 Summit Ridge Drive (Shaw)  3:03
[broadcast Coca Cola Spotlight Bands]
 22 Scuttlebutt (Shaw)  3:03
[broadcast Coca Cola Spotlight Bands]
23 Hop, Skip and Jump (Shaw, Carleton)  2:37
[broadcast Coca Cola Spotlight Bands]
24 The Sad Sack (Shaw, Harding)  3:09
[broadcast Coca Cola Spotlight Bands]
25 The Grabtown Grapple (Shaw, Harding)  3:12
[broadcast Coca Cola Spotlight Bands]

*


Cd. 2

5 titles for Thesaurus Transcriptions (EO MM603)

1 Summit Ridge Drive (Shaw)  3:32
2 The Grabtown Grapple (Shaw, Harding)  2:22
3 Smoke Gets in Your Eyes (Kern, Harbach)  2:50
4 The Pied Piper Theme (Shaw)  2:05
5 Cross Your Heart (Gensler, DeSylva)  2:25
6 There Must Be Somthing Better Than Love (Gould, Fields)  2:54
7 Nothin' from Nothin' (Gould, Fields)  3:00
8 Crumbum (Shaw)  2:44
9 The Shekomeko Shuffle (Shaw)  3:13
10 My Kinda Love (Alter, Trent)  2:52
11 Dancing on the Ceiling (Rodgers, Hart)  2:57
12 Where There's Smoke, There's Fire (Spina, Elliott)  3:09
13 My Little Nest of Heavenly Blue (Lehar, Spaeth)  3:08
14 Besame Mucho (Velasquez, Skylar)  2:57
15 That Old Feeling (Fain, Brown)  2:55
16 Tenderly (Gross, Lawrence)  2:59
17 Stop and Go Mambo (Shaw)  2:56
18 The Sad Sack (Shaw, Harding)  6:07
19 Stop and Go Mambo (Shaw)  5:38
20 Sunny Side Up (Shaw)  6:40
21 Star Dust (Carmichael, Parish)  5:55

*


Cd.3

1 When the Quail Come Back to San Quentin (Shaw)  5:59
2 Someone to Watch Over Me (Gershwin, Gershwin)  4:49
3 Besame Mucho (Velasquez, Skylar)  4:03
4 Love of My Life (Shaw, Mercer)  4:54
5 Lyric (Shaw)  6:21
6 The Chaser (Sequence in B Flat) (Shaw)  8:02
7 Autumn Leaves [take 5] (Kosma, Mercer)  3:36
8 Back Bay Shuffle (Shaw, McRae)  7:20
9 I've Got a Crush on You (Gershwin, Gershwin)  3:55
10 Begin the Beguine (Porter)  3:36
11 Summit Ridge Drive (Shaw)  6:09
12 Dancing in the Dark (Schwartz, Dietz)  4:38
13 Scuttlebutt (Shaw)  6:17
14 I Can't Get Started (Duke, Gershwin)  5:15

*

Cd. 4

1 Imagination (Burke, VanHeusen)  4:18
2 The Pied Piper Theme (Shaw)  6:18
3 Don't Take Your Love from Me (Nemo)  5:28
4 Cross Your Heart (Gensler, DeSylva)  8:00
5 How High the Moon (Lewis, Hamilton)  8:48
6 Frenesi (Dominguez)  8:24
7 The Chaser (Sequence in B Flat) [alt. version] (Shaw)  8:42
8 Rough Ridin' (Jones, Fitzgerald)  7:50
9 Dancing on the Ceiling (Rodgers, Hart)  7:13
10 Autumn Leaves [take 6] (Kosma, Mercer)  3:33
11 Crumbum [Mysterioso ?] (Shaw)  5:20

*


Cd. 5

1 Sunny Side Up [78 RPM Version] (Shaw)  2:54
2 Imagination [78 RPM Version] (Burke, VanHeusen)  3:03
3 Tenderly (Gross, Lawrence)  4:45
4 Lugubrious (Shaw)  4:41
5 The Grabtown Grapple (Shaw, Harding)  10:09
6 That Old Feeling (Fain, Brown)  4:11
7 Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered (Rodgers, Hart)  4:13
8 Rough Ridin' [alt. version] (Jones, Fitzgerald)  8:01
9 Dancing on the Ceiling* [alt. version] (Rodgers, Hart)  7:13
10 S'posin' (Denniker, Razaf)  5:34
11 September Song (Weill, Anderson)  4:09
12 Too Marvellous for Words (Whiting, Mercer)  5:47
13 My Funny Valentine (Rodgers, Hart)  5:31
14 Yesterdays (Kern, Harbach)  6:03

*

Personnel
[Cd. 1, # 1-9]
Artie Shaw - cl
Billy Butterfield - tp
Johnny Guarnieri - hrpchrd & p [# 9]
Al Hendrickson - g
Jud DeNaut - b
Nick Fatool- dr
Recorded in Hollywood Palladium*, California ; September 3 [# 1-4] ; December 5, 1940 [# 5-8] ; & January 22, 1941
[Cd. 1, # 10-25]
Artie Shaw - cl
Roy Eldridge - tp [except #14 & 22]
Dodo Marmarosa - p
Barney Kessel - g
Morris Rayman - b
Louis Fromm - dr
Recorded in New York City ; January 9-18, 1945 [# 10 & 11] ; March 4, 1945 [# 12 & 13] ; Hollywood, March 15, 1945 [# 14 & 15] ; July 31, 1945 [#16] ; August 2, 1945 [#17-20] ; Naval Hospital, San Diego ; September 12, 1945 [# 21] ; Ford Ord, California ; September 19, 1945 [# 22] ; San Luis Obispo, California ; September 26, 1945 [# 23] ; Santa Ana A.A.F. Base ; October 3, 1945 [# 24] ; & Huff Hospital, Santa Barbara ; October 10, 1945
[Cd. 2, # 1-7]
Artie Shaw - cl
Don Fagerquist - tp
Gil Barrios - p
Jimmy Raney - g
Dick Niveson - b
Irv Kluger - dr
Mary Ann McCall - vc [# 6-7]
Recorded in New York ; early January 1950 [# 1-5] ; January 6, 1950 [# 6 & 7]
[Cd. 2, # 8 & 9]
Artie Shaw - cl
Lee Castle - tp
Don Lanphere - ts
Gil Barrios - p
Jimmy Raney - g
Teddy Kotick - b
Dave Williams - dr
Recorded in New York ; April 7 & 8 [# 9], 1950
[Cd. 2, # 10 & 11]
Artie Shaw - cl
Stan Freeman - p
Don Perry - g
Bob Haggart - b
Bunny Shawker - dr
Jane Hutton - vc
Recorded in New York ; January 30, 1951
[Cd. 2, # 12 & 13]
Artie Shaw - cl
Bob Kitsis - p
George Barnes - g
Trigger Alpert - b
Buddy Schutz - dr
Connee Boswell - vc
Recorded in New York ; August 1, 1952
[Cd. 2, # 14-21 ; Cd. 3 & Cd. 4, # 1-7]
Artie Shaw - cl
Joe Roland - vb
Hank Jones - p
Tal Farlow - g
Tommy Potter - b
Irv Kluger - dr
Recorded in New York ; December 1953
[Cd. 4, # 8 & 9]
Artie Shaw - cl
Hank Jones - p
Joe Puma - g
Tommy Potter - b
Irv Kluger - dr
Recorded in Hollywood, California ; June 1954
[Cd. 4, # 10 & 11 & Cd. 5, # 1-6]
Same as Cd. 3 ; Fine Sound Studios, New York ; February/March, 1954
[Cd. 5, # 7-14]
Artie Shaw - cl
Hank Jones - p
Joe Puma - g
Tommy Potter - b
Irv Kluger - dr
Recorded in Hollywood, California ; June 1954