Friday, February 13, 2015

Monday, September 1, 2014

John Coltrane - Coltrane (Deluxe Edition)

With the success that Blue Note has had in eliciting the services of the legendary recording engineer Rudy Van Gelder in remastering the past glories of one of the most revered record labels in all of jazz, it’s no surprise that Impulse would eventually follow suit and ask Van Gelder to do the same handiwork for releases from that label’s archives. So the story goes, producer Bob Thiele would often have Van Gelder run extra copies of Coltrane recording sessions of which Thiele later maintained possession. Just recently these tapes in their pure unadulterated form were turned over to Van Gelder to use in remastering and reexamining the contents of two Coltrane classics, Ballads and Coltrane.
Of the two sets, the additional material brought to light on Coltrane seems to be of the greatest value. Disc one preserves the original five album tracks, all of which are now rendered in fabulous 24-bit sound. “Out of This World” swings ferociously and is one of the best of Coltrane’s many extended modal jams. But then, “Tunji,” and “Miles’ Mode” also rank up there pretty highly among the all-time gems.
For the tandem disc seven previously unissued performances are heard for the very first time. “Not Yet” is a churchy amen number by Tyner that was never covered elsewhere to my knowledge and an alternate of “Miles’ Mode” speaks with just as much fire, if not more, than the original leading one to wonder how the decision for the master take was ever arrived upon. A bit more disappointing are four tries at “Tunji,” none of which command the authority of the originally released version. Rounding things out though we have two studio versions of “Impressions,” “Big Nick,” and “Up ‘Gainst the Wall.” As a buddy of mine often advises me, you’ll want to throw out your old copy and get your hands on this new one. It’s the pick of the litter.
C. Andrew Hovan

Source : http://www.allaboutjazz.com/coltrane-deluxe-edition-john-coltrane-impulse-review-by-c-andrew-hovan.php#.VATEyWPrWuY

John Coltrane
Coltrane
(Deluxe Edition)

Tracks

Cd. 1

1 Out of This World (Arlen, Mercer)  14:02
2 Soul Eyes (Waldron)  5:23
3 The Inch Worm (Loesser)  6:14
4 Tunji (Coltrane)  6:31
5 Miles' Mode (Coltrane)  7:30

*

Cd. 2

1 Not Yet (Tyner)  6:12
2 Miles' Mode [alt. take] (Coltrane)  7:06
3 Tunji [alt. take] (Coltrane)  10:39
4 Tunji [alt. take] (Coltrane)  7:52
5 Tunji [alt. take] (Coltrane)  7:14
6 Tunji [alt. take] (Coltrane)  7:46
7 Impressions [alt. take] (Coltrane)  6:30
8 Impressions [alt. take] (Coltrane)  4:31
9 Big Nick (Coltrane)  4:26
10 Up 'Gainst the Wall (Coltrane)  3:13

*


Personnel
John Coltrane - ts & ss
McCoy Tyner - p
Jimmy Garrison - b
Elvin Jones - dr

Recorded at Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey ; April 11 [Cd. 1, # 3 & Cd. 2, # 9], 1962 ; June 19 [Cd. 1, # 1 & 2], 1962 ; June 20 [Cd. 1, # 5 & Cd. 2, # 1-8] ; June 29 [Cd. 1, # 4], 1962 ; & September 18 [Cd. 2, # 10], 1962

See also
http://www.amazon.com/review/R2XJYGH47Y7TF0/ref=cm_cr_dp_title?ie=UTF8&ASIN=B00006316U&channel=detail-glance&nodeID=5174&store=music

Sunday, August 31, 2014

Lee Konitz Meets Jimmy Giuffre

Two Lee Konitz with Jimmy Giuffre collaborations reunited here on one CD. In Lee Konitz Meets Jimmy Giuffre, Jimmy contributed as soloist and arranger of a five-piece saxophone section. The thoughtful, contrapuntal writing creates a delicate mood, where everybody gets a chance to blow, and the engaging work of Konitz, Bill Evans, and Warne Marsh provides extremely rewarding moments. On You and Lee, Jimmy employed only a brass section and rhythm to back the altoist. He chose to keep the brass tightly muted, working always as a section, with no individual solos. In all, these sessions are a skillful, fascinating mixture of tonal beauty and emotional improvising.

Source : http://www.freshsoundrecords.com/lee_konitz_meets_jimmy_giuffre_2_lps_on_1_cd-cd-5350.html

Lee Konitz
Meets
Jimmy Giuffre

Tracks

1 Somp’m Outa’ Nothin’ (Giuffre)  4:30
2 Someone to Watch Over Me (Gershwin, Gershwin)  3:37
3 Uncharted (Giuffre)  3:56
4 Moonlight in Vermont (Suessedorf, Blackburn)  4:00
5 The Song Is You (Kern, Hammerstein)  5:06
6 Palo Alto (Konitz)  3:09
7 Darn that Dream (VanHeusen, DeLange)  1:56
8 When Your Lover Has Gone (Swan)  5:03
9 Cork ‘n Bib (Konitz)  9:51
10 I’m Getting Sentimental over You (Bassman, Washington)  3:57
11 You Don’t Know What Love Is (Raye, DePaul)  4:19
12 I Didn’t Know about You (Ellington, Russell)  3:59
13 Ev’rything I’ve Got (Belongs to You) (Rodgers, Hart)  4:46
14 You’re Clear out of this  (Arlen, Mercer)  4:07
15 You Are Too Beautiful (Rodgers, Hart)  4:09
16 The More I See You (Warren, Gordon)  3:39
17 You’re Driving Me Crazy (Donaldson)  4:11


*


Personnel
[# 1-9] originally issued as "Lee Konitz Meets Jimmy Giuffre" (Verve MGV-8362).
Lee Konitz - as
Hal McKusick - as
Warne Marsh - ts
Ted Brown - ts
Jimmy Giuffre - bs
Bill Evans - p
Buddy Clark - b
Ronnie Free - dr
Recorded in New York City ; May 12 [# 1-5] & 13 [# 6-9], 1959.
[# 10-17] originally issued as "You And Lee" (verve MGV-8335).
Ernie Royal, Irving “Marky” Markowitz, Phil Sunkel - tp
Bob Brookmeyer - tb
Eddie Bert - tb [except # 14-17]
Billy Byers - tb
Lee Konitz - as
Bill Evans - p [except # 14-17]
Jim Hall - g [# 14-17]
Sonny Dallas - b
Roy Haynes - dr
Jimmy Giuffre - arr.
Recorded in New York City ; October 29 [# 10-13] & 30 [# 14-17], 1959

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Charlie Parker - Jazz at Massey Hall

On May 15, 1953, alto saxophonist Charlie Parker, trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie, pianist Bud Powell, bassist Charlie Mingus and drummer Max Roach stepped onto the stage of Massey Hall and played a concert that would assume mythic proportions. Each of the performers was seminal in the creation of bebop, and would be towering figures of jazz's first century. And this was the one and only time that they ever played together. The event inspired the writing of two books and numerous newspaper and magazine articles. Record jackets, and not a few fans, declared it "The Greatest Jazz Concert Ever".
The concert was the brainchild of the New Jazz Society of Toronto, a group of young enthusiasts — some would say dreamers — led by Dick Wattam. When four NJS members drove to New York one cold January night in 1953 to sign on the five seminal figures of bebop, they surely didn't realize what they were getting into.
Of course, the rescheduling of a much anticipated, championship boxing match between Rocky Marciano and Jersey Joe Walcott, broadcast on TV the night of the concert, was beyond their control. While it’s difficult to say just how much ticket sales were affected by the competition, the estimated size of the crowd that night was anywhere from 600 to 1700 in a hall that seats 2,765. As a result, the musicians never were fully paid.
Charlie Parker was a source of further anxiety. He missed his scheduled flight to Toronto from New York's La Guardia airport earlier that day and, while the details are not clear, it appears that it fell upon Dizzy Gillespie to track him down. Though they arrived in town with time to spare, Parker managed to once again go AWOL. When he finally sauntered up to Massey Hall's stage door at 8:30 — exactly the time stipulated in his contract the members of the NJS must have breathed a collective sigh of relief.
Legend has it that he arrived in town without a sax, and that the peculiar instrument he was playing was the only one he could borrow at the last minute. What's more likely is that the white plastic Grafton sax he performed on that night was the same instrument that he is now known to have had on several earlier concert dates. But it wasn't the only myth associated with that most extraordinary night.
Bud Powell, for example, did not show up drunk, as was claimed by one Charlie Parker biographer. Just three months after being discharged from a New York mental hospital, the troubled pianist needed assistance to walk to the piano. Nevertheless, his performance that night was considered by many to be a highlight of the evening. The proof, of course, is in the recording.
The "CBC All Stars", essentially a pickup band led by trumpeter Graham Topping opened the show that night, performing contemporary big-band music that included arrangements by Woody Herman and Count Basie. "Fugue for Reeds and Brass", a challenging composition by Norman Symonds, who also played baritone sax in the band, was also featured. The All Stars would return at the end of the evening to play three tunes before the quintet, minus Powell, joined-in for the finale.
The quintet had no rehearsal, and no one knew what was going to be played until just before walking onto the stage. They played three tunes, "Perdido", "Salt Peanuts" and "All the Things You Are", before breaking for intermission, at which time the band, and much of the audience, ran across Shuter Street to the Silver Rail to catch the fight in TV. (The bout was over in about two-and-a-half minutes, with Marciano winning, much to Dizzy's dismay.) Max Roach led off the second half with a solo spot called "Drum Conversation", after which Powell and Mingus joined him for a trio set. The quintet followed with performances of "Wee", "Hot House", and "A Night in Tunisia".
Of course, the organizers' excitement must have given way to a grinding anxiety when, at a meeting in the basement of Massey Hall, they had to tell their guests that they couldn't pay the balance of their fees. In "Cool Blues" : Charlie Parker in Canada, 1953, Mark Miller quotes Dick Wattam. "I personally was just mortified," he said. "I just wanted the floor to swallow me up." Ultimately, cheques were issued, but when Gillespie tried to cash his in New York, "It bounced, and bounced, and bounced," he said, "like a rubber ball."
Roach and Mingus recorded the concert on their own Debut Records. The tapes were first released on three, ten-inch albums entitled Jazz at Massey Hall, though Mingus, furious when he discovered that his bass was barely audible on the masters, later overdubbed his parts. (Recordings of the CBC All Stars have never been released commercially.) The recordings have been reissued numerous times over the years, with the quintet set recently benefiting from 20-bit remastering. And as fascinating as the extramusical stories are, nothing is more compelling than listening to the music itself.
Half a century later, the concert remains as remarkable as ever: inventive, occasionally raucous, often electric and always fascinating. Whether any concert can be proclaimed "the greatest jazz concert ever" is questionable. But there's little doubt that in 2053 people will once again be revisiting and celebrating that most extraordinary evening at Massey Hall.
Stewart Hoffman

Source : http://www.stewarthoffmanmusic.com/articles.php?id=46

Charlie Parker
Jazz at Massey Hall
The Greatest Jazz Concert Ever 

Tracks

Cd. 1

1 Perdido (Tizol)  7:06
2 Salt Peanuts (Clarke, Coleman, Gillespie)  7:30
3 All the Things You Are (Hammerstein II, Kern)  7:55
4 Wee (Best, Gillespie, Paparelli)  6:45
5 Hot House (Dameron)  9:18
6 A Night in Tunisia (Gillespie, Paparelli)  7:33

*

Cd. 2

1 Embraceable You (Gershwin)  4:14
2 Sure Thing (Calloway, Kern, Powell) 2:01
3 My Devotion (Hillman, Napton)  2:30
4 Polka Dots and Moonbeams (Van Heusen)  3:55
5 Cherokee (Noble)  4:42
6 Jubilee (Albarn, Coxon, James, Lyle, Rowntree, Wall)  3:49
7 I've Got You Under My Skin (Porter)  2:47
8 My Heart Stood Still (Rodgers)  3:26
9 I Want to Be Happy (Youmans)  4:46
10 Lullaby of Birdland (Shearing, Weiss)  2:25

 

*


Personnel
[Cd. 1]
Charlie Parker - as
Dizzy Gillespie - tp
Bud Powell - p
Charles Mingus - b
Max Roach - dr
Recorded live at Massey Music Hall, Toronto, Canada ; May 15, 1953
[Cd. 2, # 1, 2, 5, 6, 7 & 10]
Bud Powell - p
Charles Mingus - b
Max Roach - dr
Recorded same place and date as above
[Cd. 2, # 3, 4, 8 & 9]
Bud Powell - p
George Duvivier - b
Arthur Taylor - dr
Recorded live during a night-club engagement, New York City ; September, 1953

See also
http://www.jazzdisco.org/bud-powell/discography/

Zoot Sims & Henri Renaud - Night Session in Paris

"We were just one of the many acts. I thinks they opened with the trained seals and the jugglers and the comics. And then we came out as an 'American jazz band', just before the Nicholas Brothers came on to close first half. The headliner for the second half was Jacqueline François. So there were very few jazz fans in the audience [...] it was rather funny." That was how the (obviously amused) bassist Bill Crow described the Gerry Mulligan Sextet's appearance at the Olympia (as part of a programme billed between 1st and 20th 1956). It was quite a daring initiative for the period, given that modern jazz wasn't yet exactly a commonplace... Thanks to the insistence of Henri Renaud, Zoot and Jon Eardley (both part of the band) had been contacted by a French label to record an album with the former. Zoot and the pianist knew each other well, having been in the studios together three years previously with trombonist Frank Rosolino. Zoot, however — despite all the equanimity he displayed, whatever the context, as a musician who proudly claimed to be a "club musician" — didn't think it would be superfluous if they got together at some point prior to the planned session. So the day before, everyone gathered in a private studio after the Olympia concert : pianist Henri Renaud and Eddie de Haas, a Dutch bassist living in Paris ; drummer Charles Saudrais, then aged only 18 ; trumpeter Jon Eardley ; and Zoot Sims. At the request of Renaud and Zoot, who wanted to hear themselves on some tunes, the tape reels were spinning ; the spool captured two blues pieces, "Charlie Was to Rouen" and "Charlie Went to Cherbourg", and a couple of standards, "Crazy Rhythm" and "I've Found a New Baby". The results were remarkable, and any thoughts of incompatibility were immediatly forgotten ; so much so that, thanks to Frank Ténot (and also the musician's consensus that they were quite happy with what they'd just invented in a loose, extremely good-naturel atmosphere), the tapes from what was originally intended as a private test were released by the Club Français du Disque. The next day, with Benoît Quersin replacing Eddie de Haas on bass, they went into the Thorens studios...
Alain Tercinet, from the booklet (english translation Nina Schmir)

Zoot Sims
Henti Renaud
Night Session in Paris

Tracks

1 Charlie Went to Cherbourg (Renaud, Sims)  6:43
2 Crazy Rhythm (Caesar, Meyer, Kahn)  7:51
3 I've Found a New Baby (Palmer, Williams)  7:29
4 Charlie Was in Rouen (Mercer, Whiting)  4:08
5 Captain Jetter (Renaud)  5:04
6 Nuzzolese Blues (Renaud, Eardley, Sims)  7:23
7 Everything I Love (Porter)  4:20
8 On the Alamo (Kahn, Jones)  5:37
9 Evening in Paris (Jones)  3:22
10 My Old Flame (Johnston, Coslow)  3:26
11 Little John Special (Eardley)  4:56

*


Personnel
[# 1-4]
Jon Eardley - tp
Zoot Sims - ts
Henri Renaud - p
Eddie de Haas - b
Charles Saudrais - dr
Recorded in Paris ; March 15, 1956
[# 5-11]
Same as above, except
Jon Eardley - tp, is out on #9
Benoît Quersin - b, replaces Haas
Recorded at Studio Thorens, Paris ; March 16, 1956

Friday, August 29, 2014

Sonny Rollins Plus 4

1956, Sonny Rollins was spiritually and physically rejuvenated. And on Sonny Rollins Plus 4, he's clearly inspired by Max Roach and Clifford Brown's depth of spirit. Multi-dimensional re-arrangements of popular songs were a Brown-Roach trademark. "Kiss and Run" is treated to a stop-and-go intro, then settles into a brisk 4/4, as Rollins, Brown, and the perennially underrated Richie Powell fashion long dancing lines. "I Feel a Song Coming On" creates tension by alternating a vamp figure with a swinging release. Rollins takes an immense solo, contrasting chanting figures and foghorn-like long tones with Parker-ish elisions, and Brown answers with buzzing figures and daring harmonic extensions. Then Roach takes things out with sweeping melodic choruses and polyrhythmic fanfares, setting the stage for a torrid tenor-trumpet duel. On "Valse Hot," there's an early example of a successful jazz waltz as Rollins offers up one of his most charming themes. Max Roach treats the European three with the dancing elan of an American four, and Rollins responds by floating in between the beat, syncopating in Monk-ish stabs and thrusts, as Brown answers with the kind of rhythmically complex, sweetly articulated melodic lines that have inspired every modern trumpeter.
Rovi Staff 

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/sonny-rollins-plus-4-mw0001990895

Sonny Rollins
Sonny Rollins
Plus 4

Tracks

1 Valse Hot (Rollins)  8:38
2 Kiss and Run (Coslow)  7:10
3 I Feel a Song Coming On (Fields, McHugh, Oppenheimer)  5:14
4 Count Your Blessings (Instead of Sheep) (Berlin)  2:31
5 Pent-Up House (Rollins)  8:53

*


Personnel
Sonny Rollins - ts
Clifford Brown - tp
Richie Powell - p
George Morrow - b
Max Roach - dr

Recorded in New York City ; March 22, 1956

Barney Wilen - Jazz Sur Seine

Tenor saxophonist Barney Wilen was not quite 21 years old at the time of this meeting with Milt Jackson, Percy Heath, and Kenny Clarke, three veterans of the Modern Jazz Quartet. But the young man is surprising mature and confident throughout the session, interpreting several of Django Reinhardt's compositions, along with a few by his French contemporaries and a pair of his own works. What's surprising about this session is the rare opportunity to hear Jackson exclusively as a pianist, as his playing is a bit more reserved than on vibes. The leader digs into his rhythm section's element with his original "B.B.B. (Bag's Barney Blues)," giving them a full chorus before making a convincing statement himself. The quartet's fluid arrangement of Thelonious Monk's "Epistrophy" swings. Percussionist Gana M'Bow is added for both "Swing 39" and "Minor Swing" to add an exotic touch. Wilen easily holds his own on his first major meeting on a record date with major American jazz stars. This excellent CD is part of Verve International's affordable midline Jazz in Paris reissue series.
Ken Dryden

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/jazz-in-paris-jazz-sur-seine-mw0000662008

Barney Wilen
Jazz sur Seine 

Tracks

1 Swing 39 (Reinhardt)  4:29
2 Vamp (Reinhardt)  4:20
3 Ménilmontant (Trénet)  3:35
4 John's Groove (Fol)  3:40
5 B.B.B. (Bag's Barney Blues) (Wilen)  6:38
6 Swingin' Parisian Rhythm (Jazz Sur Seine) (Wilen)  4:29
7 J'ai ta main (Trénet)  2:21
8 Nuages (Reinhardt)  5:52
9 La Route Enchantée (Trénet)  3:06
10 Que reste-t-il de nos amours ? (Trénet)  2:47
11 Minor Swing (Grappelli, Reinhardt) 3:48
12 Epistrophy (Clarke, Monk)  2:45

*


Personnel
Barney Wilen - ts
Milt Jackson - p
Percy Heath - b
Kenny Clarke - dr
Gana M'Bow - prc [# 1 & 11]

Recorded in Paris ; February 13 & 14, 1958

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

The Real McCoy Tyner

Two and a half years after his last recording as a leader for Impulse, pianist McCoy Tyner emerged to start a period on Blue Note that would result in seven albums. Having left John Coltrane's Quartet in late 1965, Tyner was entering a period of struggle, although artistically his playing grew quite a bit in the late '60s. For this release, the pianist is teamed with tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Elvin Jones for five of his originals. Highlights of the easily recommended album include "Passion Dance," "Four by Five," and "Blues on the Corner."
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.bluenote.com/artists/mccoy-tyner/the-real-mccoy

McCoy Tyner
The Real McCoy

Tracks

1 Passion Dance  8:44
2 Contemplation  9:10
3 Four by Five  6:33
4 Search for Peace  6:27
5 Blues on the Corner  5:58

All Compositions by McCoy Tyner


*


Personnel
Joe Henderson - ts
McCoy Tyner - p
Ron Carter - b
Elvin Jones - dr

Recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey ; April 21, 1967.

Monday, August 25, 2014

Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli - The unpublished EMI live recordings (London 1957)

The best track to play first on this magnificent set is the last, where Michelangeli spends half an hour rehearsing and accommodating an audio soundcheck. He dives effortlessly into Debussy’s “Reflets dans l’eau”, gives a sickly sniff (he had a bad cold at the time), chats a little, throws off some miraculously even scales, shifts to “Hommage a Rameau” — repeating the odd phrase at will — and then ushers in the misty chiming of “Cloches a travers les feuilles”. However, at 9'28'' he stops playing, frustrated over some aspect of the instrument ; there’s a spot of fairly heated banter, a hapless technician mutters “nothing to do with me!” and Michelangeli continues through most of Schumann’s Faschingsschwank aus Wien. Were you to stop there, you would already have heard some of the most stylish, finely sculpted and fastidiously phrased pianism on disc ; but the main prize is the concert itself — taped at the Royal Festival Hall the day before those historic Rachmaninov/ Ravel concerto recordings (9/88) and discovered in EMI’s documentation by Malcolm Walker.
Readers who are familiar with Michelangeli’s 1971 DG recording of Debussy’s Images will be astonished at this highly mobile 1957 concert performance of “Cloches a travers les feuilles”, which is almost a full minute faster than its stereo successor ; or “Reflets dans l’eau”, which glides across the water’s surface with such swiftness and ease that the more considered DG alternative — glorious though it is — sounds studied by comparison. “Hommage a Rameau” is shaped with the utmost finesse and “Et la lune descend sur le temple qui fut” coloured by exquisitely graded nuances.
As for repertoire, the Schumann items duplicate a BBC broadcast recording from the same month, once available on a BBC Records LP (2/82 – nla). There are minor differences between the two in terms of tempo and phrasing (for example, Carnaval’s “Promenade” clocks up 2'40'' in the broadcast as opposed to 2'27'' in concert), but Testament’s vastly superior sound quality – surely the best mono Michelangeli recording on the market – swings the balance securely in its favour. The performance of Carnaval is a choice gallery of aural sculpture, whether in the minutely calculated responses of “Pierrot”, the teasing rubato of “Coquette”, the energy and attack of “Papillons”, the effortless flow of “Chopin” or the ecstatic lingerings in “Aveu”. Michelangeli’s “Eusebius” is tender but unsentimental, whereas his “Florestan” has enough ‘reflective’ ingredients to suggest that the two characters are closer in spirit than we often think. Faschingsschwank aus Wien contrasts muscular assertiveness (the opening Allegro) with the most amazing control (in the “Romanze”), while the “Intermezzo” promotes a virtually orchestral range of dynamics.
Michelangeli’s Chopin has a rare nobility, the Fantasie in F minor especially which, at a rather faster tempo than usual, holds together as a narrative entity. The First Ballade is marginally freer in approach than the memorable DG recording of 1972 (11/84), though no less imposing. Then there are the encores, a sunny posthumous E flat Waltz (a regular extra on Michelangeli’s concert programmes) and Mompou’s sad but tender “Cancion”. I came to the end of this set humbled by, and grateful for, some wonderful piano playing. Michelangeli’s art is both rare and elusive, his expressive vocabulary finely distilled and unlikely to impress those who listen only for technical mastery. It’s therefore ironic that those who criticize Michelangeli for ‘coldness’ or ‘aloofness’ are often the very commentators who are so dazzled by his virtuosity that they cannot hear beyond it. Take note, and do not suppose that a glittering surface precludes a searching musical mind. Testament’s transfers are superb, and so are BM’s notes.

Source : http://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/michelangeli-london-recital-march-1957

Arturo Benedetti
Michelangeli
Plays
Schumann
Debussy
Chopin
Mompou
(The unpublished EMI live recordings, London 1957)

Tracks

Cd. 1

Robert Schumann
(1810-1856)

Faschingsschwank aus Wien, Op. 26
1 I. Allegro. Sehr Lebhaft  9:57
2 II. Romanze. Ziemlich langsam  2:48
3 III. Scherzino  2:14
4 IV. Intermezzo. Mit grösster Energie  2:08
5 V. Finale. Höchst lebhaft  5:05

Carnaval, Op. 9
Scènes mignonnes sur quatre notes
6 I. Préambule. Quasi maestoso - Più moto - Animato - Vivo - Presto  2:22
7 II. Pierrot. Moderato  2:02
8 III. Arlequin. Vivo  1:07
9 IV. Valse noble. Un poco maestoso  1:46
10 V. Eusebius. Adagio  1:12
11 VI. Florestan. Passionato  0:56
12 VII. Coquette. Vivo  1:36
13 VIII. Répliques. L'istesso tempo - (Sphinxes)  1:09
14 IX. Papillons. Prestissimo  0:36
15 X. A.S.C.H. - S.C.H.A (Lettres dansantes). Presto  0:57
16 XI. Chiarina. Passionato  0:59
17 XII. Chopin. Agitato  1:15
18 XIII. Estrella. Con affetto  0:26
19 XIV. Reconnaissance. Animato  1:40
20 XV. Pantalon et Colombine. Presto  0:50
21 XVI. Valse allemande. Molto vivace  0:58
22 XVII. Paganini. Itermezzo. Presto  1:24
23 XVIII. Aveu. Passionato  1:12
24 XIX. Promenade. Comodo  2:27
25 XX. Pause. Vivo  0:14
26 XXI. Marche des "Davidsbündler" contre les Philistins.
Non allegro - Molto più vivo - Animato - Vivo - Animato molto -Vivo - Più Stretto  4:02

*

Cd. 2

Claude Debussy
(1862-1918)

1 Et la lune descend sur la temple qui fut. Lent (Images, Série/Set II, II)  5:02
2 Cloches à travers les feuilles. Lent (Images, Série/Set II, I)  3:33
3 Hommage à Rameau. Lent et grave (Images, Série/Set I, II)  6:20
4 Reflets dans l'eau. Andantino molto (Images, Série/Set I, I)  4:29

Frédéric Chopin
(1810-1849)

5 Fantasie in F minor, Op.49  12:43
6 Ballade n° 1 in G minor, Op.23  8:52

Frederico Mompou
(1893-1987)

7 Canción (from Canción y Danza n° 6)  1:48

Frédéric Chopin
(1810-1849)

8 Valse in E flat major, Op. posth.  2:49

9 Rehearsal and sound-check  32:47

*


Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli - p

Sunday, August 24, 2014

Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli Plays Scarlatti, Beethoven, Clementi & Chopin

For near-consistent technical perfection Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli was probably unequalled in his lifetime. But was he a consummate artist, too ? Yes, when the music touched a chord in him. Regrettably, Beethoven’s Op 111 doesn’t. There’s no questioning the rhythmic grip on the work, note-values scrupulously observed, the subdivisions of the beat in the second movement nicely integrated into the overall pulse. But Michelangeli is emotionally detached and the dynamic range is also narrow.
Clementi fares much better. The second movement of Op 12 No 1, Larghetto con espressione, is just that, but it doesn’t prepare listeners for the audacity that follows in the last movement, a Theme and 11 variations. Michelangeli omits Nos 3, 7 and 11, rearranges the order of some of the others and ends with Variation 9, and rounds that off with a dexterous coda of his own. Well, the playing simply disarms criticism. So do the performances of Scarlatti’s Kk172 and Kk11, but some impassivity creeps into the A major sonata Kk322 (not the B flat Kk332, as erroneously stated in the documentation).
The sound is not the last word in fidelity but offers no barrier to communication, especially in Chopin’s sonata. This is the raison d’être of the disc, an interpretation of extraordinarily individual insight into the coruscating power, brooding intensity and yearning lyricism of an extraordinary work. Michelangeli is right inside the music, carrying it along in a compulsively powerful undertow. No aloofness here. The much-abused epithet ‘great’ really does apply.
Nalen Anthoni

Source : http://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/beethoven-piano-sonata-no-32-chopin-piano-sonata-no-2-in-b-flat

Arturo Benedetti
Michelangeli
Plays
Scarlatti
Beethoven
Clementi
Chopin

Tracks

Domenico Scarlatti
(1685-1757)

Three Keyboard Sonatas
1 Sonata C minor, K. 11 (L. 352)  2:59
2 Sonata n B-flat major, K. 332 (L. 141)  2:20
3 Sonata in B-flat major, K. 172 (L. S40)  4:23
Piano Sonata No. 32 in C minor, Op. 111

Ludwig van Beethoven
(1770-18    27)

Piano Sonata n° 32 in C minor, Op. 111
4 I. Maestoso - Allegro con brio ed appassionato  8:40
5 II. Arietta. Adagio molto semplice e cantabile  16:43

Muzio Clementi
(1752-1832)

Piano Sonata in B flat major, Op. 12 n° 1
6 I. Presto  6:50
7 II. Larghetto con espressione  3:06
8 III. Allegretto  7:32

Frédéric Chopin
(1810-1849)

Piano Sonata n° 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35
9 I. Grave - Doppio movimento  7:35
10 II. Scherzo   7:50
11 III. Marche Funèbre. Lento - attacca:  9:19
12 IV. Finale. Presto  1:36

*

Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli - p

Recorded at the BBC Studios, Maida Vale, London ; May 12, 1961 (Scarlatti & Beethoven) ; June 30, 1959 (Clementi & Chopin)

Herbie Hancock - Empyrean Isles

My Point of View and Inventions and Dimensions found Herbie Hancock exploring the fringes of hard bop, working with a big band and a Latin-flavored percussion section, respectively. On Empyrean Isles, he returns to hard bop, but the results are anything but conventional. Working with cornetist Freddie Hubbard, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Tony Williams — a trio just as young and adventurous as he was — Hancock pushes at the borders of hard bop, finding a brilliantly evocative balance between traditional bop, soul-injected grooves, and experimental, post-modal jazz. Hancock's four original concepts are loosely based on the myths of the Empyrean Isles, and they are designed to push the limits of the band and of hard bop. Even "Cantaloupe Island," well-known for its funky piano riff, takes chances and doesn't just ride the groove. "The Egg," with its minimal melody and extended solo improvisations, is the riskiest number on the record, but it works because each musician spins inventive, challenging solos that defy convention. In comparison, "One Finger Snap" and "Oliloqui Valley" adhere to hard bop conventions, but each song finds the quartet vigorously searching for new sonic territory with convincing fire. That passion informs all of Empyrean Isles, a record that officially established Hancock as a major artist in his own right.
Thomas Erlewine

Source : www.allmusic.com/album/empyrean-isles-mw0000243449

Herbie Hancock
Empyrean Isles 

Tracks

1 One Finger Snap  7:17
2 Oliloqui Valley  8:27
3 Cantaloupe Island
Herbie Hancock  5:30
4 The Egg  13:57
5 One Finger Snap [alt. take]  7:33
6 Oliloqui Valley [alt. take]  10:45

All Compositions by Herbie Hancok

*


Personnel
Freddie Hubbard - crnt
Herbie Hancock - p
Ron Carter - b
Tony Williams - dr

Recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, Englewood, Cliffs, New Jersey ; June 17, 1964

Friday, August 22, 2014

Howard Roberts - The Magic Band Live at Donte's

Given the quasi-commercial nature of Robert's recordings for Capitol (as good as they were) the record buying public never really had the opportunity to hear what a hard swinger he was. And, while Roberts achieved praise and recognition from players as diverse as Clint Strong and Steve Morse for such albums as Dirty Guitar Player (Capitol SM1961) and Color Him Funky (Capitol T1887) these cuts, recorded around the same period (1968) and with a similar personnel reveal an altogether more adventurous and hard-hitting player. None of the CDs 5 cuts are weak and the sound quality is particularly good, given the circumstances of the recording. Highlights include a blistering "When Sunny Gets Blue", great melodic chord work on "Shiny Stockings" and the hard-hitting 'Take No Prisoners' introduction to Cole Porter's "All of You". The CD liner notes are beautifully presented and the 3 previously unpublished photographs of Roberts show him to be the very personification of a jazz guitarist. Indispensable !

Source : http://utstat.utoronto.ca/mikevans/hroberts/sounds/leader.html

Howard Roberts
The Magic Band Live at Donte's

Tracks

1 All of You (Porter)  13:30
2 Shiny Stockings (Foster)  15:50
3 All Blues (Davis)  12:40
4 Polka Dots and Moonbeams (Burke, Van Heusen)  12:26
5 When Sunny Gets Blue (Fisher, Segal)  17:17

*

Personnel
Howard Roberts - g
Steve Bohannon - org
Tom Scott - as, ss & ts
Chuck Berghofer - b
John Guerin - dr

Recorded live at Donte's, Los Angeles ; July, 1968

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Django Reinhardt 1935 (2) - Intégrale, vol. 3

During the nine months spent under contract with Ultraphone (late 1934 to late September 1935), the Quintet of the Hot Club of France was playing a repertoire that went far beyond the one actually recorded. It included a certain number of original compositions by its star soloists, only two of which actually found their way on to disc. Of these, Ultrafox is an obvious tribute to the record company itself (which also ran a budget label called Ultravox), while Djangology would be waxed almost as an afterthought, the very last instrumental number by the group for Ultraphone, its final three efforts being as accompanying group to singers. Djangology, one of his most characteristic compositions and personal favourites, would remain in Django’s repertoire for the remainder of his career, and he recorded it again on many future occasions. Strikingly intimate, the present rendering surely remains the most crystalline of all, revealing beyond all doubt Django’s immense talents as a composer, albeit one blithely ignorant of the rules of reading, writing and harmony. All the rest of the Quintet’s recordings from this period are made up, as might be expected, of old jazz warhorses (Tiger Rag, St. Louis Blues, I’ve Found A New Baby), well-established popular songs (Dinah, Avalon, Sheik Of Araby, Some Of These Days, Crazy Rhythm), new tunes still in search of an audience (Blue Drag, Chasing Shadows, Lily Belle May June, I’ve Had My Moments, Smoke Rings) and numbers from American musical comedies and films (Lady Be Good, The Continental). With these early memorable cuts by the Quintet, jazz was setting off down a totally new avenue, and one that was in no way American. True, the Joe Venuti-Eddie Lang violin-guitar pairing had laid the foundations of this sort of “chamber jazz” back in the 1920s, but the overall sound and concept of the Quintet was entirely new, and certainly very different from anything that had gone before. During these various sessions, Django, Grappelli and company played host to numerous guests. In addition to Jerry Mengo — a drummer of Italian origin brought up in England, whose playing and singing on Lily Belle May June, Sweet Sue and The Continental are equally approximate —, we also encounter a couple of American soloists then resident in Europe, Arthur Briggs and Frank “Big Boy” Goudie, and one or two young French jazzmen still keen to make a name for themselves, principal among them Alix Combelle.
Adapted by Don Waterhouse from the French text of Daniel Nevers
© Frémeaux et Associés SA 1996

 Source : http://www.fremeaux.com/index.php?option=com_virtuemart&page=shop.livrets&content_id=3767&
product_id=297&category_id=57 

Django Reinhardt
"Djangology"
The complete Django Reinhardt, vol. 3

(1935)

Cd. 1 

DJANGO REINHARDT & LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE
1 Lilly May June (Cooker, Sullivan)  3:15
2 Sweet Sue (Young, Harris)  2:52
3 Confessin’ (Daugherty, Reynolds)  2:52
4 The Continental (Conrad, Magidson)  2:58

PATRICK & SON ORCHESTRE DE DANSE
5 Miss Otis Regrets (Porter)  3:03
6 Waltzing with a Dream (Sasenko)  3:19

FREDDY TAYLOR AND HIS ORCHESTRA
7 Swanee River (Trad.) 3:03

PIERRE LORD
8 Simplement (Grappelli, Montreux, Féral)  3:09
9 Smoke Gets in Your Eyes (Kern, Palex, Hennevé)  2:47
10 Cocktails pour deux (Johnston, Coslow, Palex, Hennevé)  3:07

DJANGO REINHARDT & LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE
11 Blue Drag (Allen)  2:51
12 Swanee River (Trad.)  3:01
13 Ton doux sourire (Smith, Ray)  2:53
14 Ultrafox (Reinhardt)  3:19

GERMAINE & JEAN SABLON
15 Un amour comme le notre (Borel, Clerc)  2:59
16 La Petite île (Mireille, Nohain)  2:50

NANE CHOLET
17 Si j’avais été (Tranchant)  3:00
18 Fièvre (Moonglow) (Hudson, Mills, DeLange, Tranchant)  3:18

ALIX COMBELLE & SON ORCHESTRE
19 What a Difference a Day Made (Grover, Adams)  2:27
20 The Sheik of Araby (Wheller, Smith, Snyder)  2:17

*


Cd. 2 

PATRICK & SON ORCHESTRE
1 I Get a Kick out of You (Porter)  3:13
2 You and the Night and the Music (Schwartz, Dietz)  2:54
3 Seagulis (Lebovici)  2:46
4 Anything Goes (Porter)  2:31
5 Easter Parade (Berlin)  3:12
6 I’m Gonna Wash my Hands of You (Pola, Viena)  2:24

DJANGO REINHARDT & LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE,
AVEC ARTHUR BRIGGS & STÉPHANE GRAPELLY
7 Avalon (Rose, Jolson)  2:50
8 Smoke Rings (Gifford)  2:50

STÉPHANE GRAPELLY & LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE,
AVEC DJANGO REINHARDT
9. Clouds (Donaldson) 3’11
10. Believe It, Beloved (Johnson) 3’10

FRANCK “BIG BOG” GOODIE, AVEC SECTION RYTHMIQUE
11 I’ve Found a New Baby (Palmer, Williams)  2:40
12 St Louis Blues (Handy)  3:01

ALIX COMBELLE & LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE
13 Crazy Rhythm (Meyer, Kahn)  2:30
14 The Sheik of Araby (Wheeler, Smith, Snyder)  2:36

DJANGO REINHARDT & LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE,
AVEC STÉPHANE GRAPELLY
15 Chasing Shadows (Davis, Silver)  2:57
16 I’ve Had my Moments (Donaldson, Kahn)  2:56
17 Some of These Days (Brooks)  2:22
18 Djangology (Reinhardt)  2:54

NANE CHOLET
19 Ainsi soit-il (Tranchant)  2:52
20 Les Quatre farceurs (Tranchant)  2:42

BRUCE BOYCE, AVEC DJANGO REINHARDT & STÉPHANE GRAPELLY
21 Run Mary, Run / Didn’t It Rain (Trad./Arr. Burleigh)  2:37

*



Personnel
Feat. Django Reinhardt, Oscar Aleman ?, Roger Chaput, Joseph Reinhardt, Baro Ferret, Stéphane Grappelli, Michel Warlop, Sylvio Schmidt, Louis Vola, Louis Pecqueux, Eugène d'Hellemmes, Sigismond Beck, André Ekyan, Alix Combelle, Andy Foster, Maurice Cizeron, Chester Lanier, Fletcher Allen, Charles "Coco" Kiehn, Arthur Briggs, Alex Renard, Noël Chiboust, Gaston Lapeyronnie, Freddy Taylor, Charlie Johnson, Alphonse Cox, Guy Paquinet, Pierre Deck, René Weiss, Jean Chabaud, René Ronald, Alec Siniavine, Emil Stern, Roger Chomer, Maurice Chaillou, William Diemer, Jerry Mengo, Jerry Mengo, Freddy Taylor, Jean Sablon, Germaine Sablon, Hilldegarde Sell, Pierre Lord, Nane Cholet, Jean Tranchant, etc...

Recorded between February 3 & September 27, 1935

(See the complete artwork for all details, places, musicians, dates, etc.)