Wednesday, September 17, 2064

Saturday, September 23, 2017

George Barnes Plays so Good

When George Barnes died, I lost a beautiful friend and the world lost a great musician. There have been and still are marvelous guitarists of whom l am well aware and highly respect, yet George Barnes always brought me a special sort of nourishment whenever he played — indeed, whenever I was with him. Notes, patterns, lines, call them what you will, always went where l wanted them to go. This may sound paradoxical since they always moved to unexpected places. He was certainly the wittiest jazz musician l have ever heard. As well, he was a true romanticist. And add to that, his extraordinarily acute and discerning ear resulted in some of the most brilliant solos l have ever heard. His warmth, stylishness and wit never failed to make me feel happy and fulfilled. l once suggested to him a title for an album he was planning to record. The title was Aspects of the Truth. For his concept of music was a constant series of facets of my definition of truth. l loved him very much, am desolated by his death but am delighted that his talent and taste may still be heard on this recording in which he plays the key role in a quartet of sympathetic and musically congenial fellow musicians.
Alec Wilder, from the booklet

George Barnes
Plays so Good

Tracks

1 Night and Day (Porter)  2:22
2 I'm Coming Virginia (Cook, Heywood)  2:19
3 Days of Wine and Roses (Mancini, Mercer)  4:00
4 Don't Get Around Much Anymore (Ellington, Russell)  3:58
5 On a Clear Day (You Can See Forever) (Lane, Lerner)  2:42
6 I've Found a New Baby (Palmer, Williams)  5:24
7 George Barnes Rap/Intro  0:46
8 Honeysuckle Rose (Razaf, Waller)  4:32
9 St. Louis Blues (Handy)  3:36
10 At Sundown (Donaldson)  3:59

*

Personnel
George Barnes - g
Duncan James - g
Dean Rely - b
Benny Barth - dr

Recorded live at Bimbo's Francisco, Califoria ; April 17, 1977

A Sultry Serenade by Herbie Mann

For five of the eight cuts here, Mann has a sextet that sports an intriguing sonority — his flute stands alongside such underappreciated masters as the baritone saxophonist/bass clarinetist Jack Nimitz, trombonist Urbie Green and guitarist Joe Puma. No less a great bassist than Oscar Pettiford lays down the low-end law, while drummer Charlie Smith proves an expert with brushes on drums and cymbals. There are also three quartet dates sans Green and Nimitz. This is most definitely very fine post-bop modern jazz, with a harmonic twist or turn here and there. Mann has a pied-piper-like approach during his lone composition "Let Me Tell You," a head-nodding swing over an easy tempo. On Mann's spooky arrangement for the standard ballad "When the Sun Comes Out," the bass clarinet of Nimitz cues Smith's cymbal washes, with Green's trombone and Mann's whooshy flute making inquiring statements as the guitar embellishes with slightly wrought chords. Mann switches to bass clarinet on "Lazy Bones," paced as its title says. Nimitz is on a throaty Gerry Mulligan-esque bari with Green, collectively attaining a low-end growl, sounding like they're all ready to pounce, as Puma's snappy solo grounds the strike force. Mann (on flute) and Puma lead the easygoing Tyree Glenn-penned title track, with Nimitz's bass clarinet traipsing on eggshells for this dainty melody. The quartet tracks include "Swingin' 'Til the Girls Come Home," which proves the ultimate vehicle for Mann's lyricism, Puma's improvisational expertise, and those typical tall round notes from genius Pettiford. This date should not be forgotten as one of Herbie Mann's best.
Michael G. Nastos

Source : http://www.cduniverse.com/productinfo.asp?pid=1036598&style=music&fulldesc=T

Herbie Mann
Sultry Serenade

Tracks

1 Let Me Tell You (Mann)  4:25
2 When the Sun Comes Out (Arlen, Koehler)  4:55
3 Professor* (Puma)  3:43
4 Lazy Bones (Carmichael, Mercer)  7:02
5 Sultry Serenade (Tyree)  5:01
6 Little Man* (You've Had a Busy Day) (Hoffman, Sigler, Wayne)  5:10
7 One Morning in May (Carmichael)  4:03
8 Swing Till the Girls Come Home* (Pettiford)  4:52

*

Personnel
SEXTET
Herbie Mann - fl, alt. fl & b cl
Jack Nimitz - b cl & bs
Urbie Green - tb
Joe Puma - g
Oscar Pettiford - b
Charlie Smith - dr
QUARTET*
Herbie Mann - fl & alt. fl
Joe Puma - g
Oscar Pettiford - b
Charlie Smith - dr

Recorded in New York City ; April 1 & 8, 1957.

Fred Katz & His Music

Fred Katz (born February 25, 1919) is an American composer, songwriter, conductor, cellist, pianist, and professor. In jazz, a principal contribution of Katz has been, as Leonard Feather noted, “to put the cello to full use both in arco and pizzicato solos.” Oscar Pettiford had already indicated the considerable jazz potential of plucked (pizzicato) cello, but with Oscar, the instrument remained
secondary to his primary instrument, the bass. Katz was the first musician to utilize all of the cello in jazz as his chief instrument in that idiom.
Katz opinion about his own contribution can be glimpsed from his own statement: “I would like to correct an impression about me that apparently is gaining some acceptance among jazz musicians and critics. That impression is that I am not basically a jazz musician. When they say my music isn’t jazz, my answer is, ‘what composition are they talking about?’ I’m not concerned with conforming to anybody’s concept of what they would like to hear. With all that is in me, I’m trying to write music in the universal sense. If sometimes a ‘jazz’ phrase makes sense in a composition, I’ll write it.”

Fred Katz
and His Music
Soulº Cello
4-5-6 Trio
& His Jammers
(3 Lps On 2 Cds)

Tracks

Cd. 1

1 Country Gardens (Grainger)  2:46
2 Satori (Katz)  3:44
3 Andante (Henderson)  2:36
4 Circus (Alter, Russell)  3:20
5 Wayfaring Stranger (trad.)  2:30
6 Time after Time (Styne, Cahn)  3:51
7 The Vidiot (Katz)  2:05
8 Lament of the Oracles (Katz)  3:49
9 I’m Glad There is You (Dorsey, Madeira)  3:09
10 The Toy That Never Was (Katz)  3:33
11 Intermezzo (Prevost)  2:52
12 Come with Me (Marx)  2:50
13 Symphony [bonus tracks] (Lawrence, Alstone)  2:54
14 While the Music Plays On [bonus tracks] (Fien, Mills, Heim)  4:22
15 Four, Five, Six (Pisano)  3:46
16 Sophisticated Lady (Ellington, Parish, Mills)  4:15

*

 

Cd. 2

1 Isn’t It Romantic (Rodgers, Hart)  2:40
2 Delia (Gaylor)  4:41
3 Like Someone in Love (Burke, VanHeusen)  2:48
4 Krelch (Gaylor)  3:25
5 Mountain Air (Katz)  3:22
6 Perdido (Tizol)  4:47
7 I’m Gettin’ Sentimental Over You (Washington, Bassman)  5:31
8 Feeling the Blues (Vinnegar)  6:41
9 Elegy (Katz)  2:32
10 Imagination (Burke, VanHeusen)  3:24
11 Vintage 57 (Vinnegar, Norris)  4:25
12 Old Folks (Robinson, Hills)  4:53
13 The Blow Is to Know (Katz)  4:33
14 Sometimes I’m Happy (Youmans, Caesar)  4:39
15 Ruby My Dear (Monk)  3:58
16 Dixie, Why Not ? (Katz)  4:09
17 Dexterity (Parker)  3:30

All tracks arranged & conducted by Fred Katz


*

Personnel
[Cd. 1, # 1-12] Fred Katz & His Music - Soul° Cello (Decca DL 9202)
Fred Katz - cel
Paul Horn - fl, cl & as [# 1, 4-7 & 11]
Buddy Collette - as  [# 1, 4-7 & 11]
Harry Klee - fl  [# 1, 4-7 & 11]
Bill Green - fl  [# 1, 4-7 & 11]
Calvin Jackson - p
Ann Stockton - hrp
John Pisano - g
Hal Gaylor - b
Chico Hamilton - dr
Recorded at the Decca Studios, Hollywood, California ; January 15 & 22 [# 1, 4-7 & 11], 1958
[Cd. 1, # 13 & 14] John Pisano & Billy Bean - Makin' It (Decca DL 9206), here
Fred Katz - p [# 13] & cel [# 14]
Calvin Jackson - p [# 14]
John Pisano - g
Billy Bean - g
Gene Estes - vb
Hal Gaylor - b
Larry Bunker [# 13] & Chico Hamilton - dr [# 14]
Alexander Neiman, Irving Manning - vl [# 14]
Raphael Kramer - cel
Edgar Lustgarten - cel [# 14]
Recorded same place as above ; January 24 [# 13] & 30, 1958
[Cd. 1, # 15-16 & Cd. 2, # 1-7] Fred Katz - "4-5-6 TRIO" (Decca DL 9213)
Fred Katz - cel
John Pisano - g
Hal Gaylor - b
Recorded Same place as above ; May 26, 1958
[Cd. 2, # 8-17] Fred Katz & His Jammers (Decca DL 9217)
Fred Katz - cel
Don Fagerquist - tp
Pete Candoli - tp [# 9, 14, 16 & 17]
Gene Estes - vb
Leroy Vinnegar - b
Frank Butler - dr [# 9, 14, 16 & 17]
Billy Higgins - dr [# 11, 12 & 15]
Lenny McBrowne - dr [# 8, 10 & 13]
Recorded same place as above ; March 12, 1959 [# 8, 10 & 13] ; May 26, 1959 [# 11, 12 & 15] ; & August 28, 1959 [# 9, 14, 16 & 17]

Kenny Burrell - For Charlie Christian & Benny Goodman

Kenny Burrell's tribute to Charlie Christian and Benny Goodman covers 11 of the songs they recorded together, but doesn't make the mistake of trying to sound anything like their historic recordings during their short time performing together. The guitarist is joined by a first-rate group, including Phil Woods on alto sax and clarinet, bassist Ron Carter, drummer Grady Tate, and vibraphonist Mike Maneri. Burrell is the only soloist on a soft bossa nova treatment of "As Long As I Live" and the lightly swinging "I Surrender Dear." Things pick up a bit with a driving arrangement of "Stompin' at the Savoy," as Woods' brash alto briefly grabs the spotlight in exchanges with the leader, while Woods switches to clarinet for the snappy blues "A Smooth One" (which also adds Richard Wyands on piano) and the foot-patting "Moonglow." Burrell kicks into high gear for one of Goodman's most requested numbers, the always exciting "Seven Come Eleven," which also has a brief understated vibes solo by Maneri. This release was titled A Generation Ago Today when it first appeared on LP, but was retitled for its CD reissue, which contains three tracks omitted from the original record, and it is well worth acquiring by fans of Kenny Burrell.
Ken Dryden

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:wzfpxqtgldhe

Kenny Burrell
For Charlie Christian
&
Benny Goodman
(aka A Generation Ago Today)

Tracks

1 As Long as I Live (Arlen, Koehler)  2:40
2 Poor Butterfly (Golden, Hubbell)  5:45
3 Stompin' at the Savoy (Goodman, Razaf, Sampson, Webb)  6:06
4 I Surrender, Dear (Barris, Clifford)  4:45
5 Rose Room (Hickman, Williams)  5:30
6 If I Had You (Campbell, Connelly, Shapiro)  2:38
7 A Smooth One (Goodman)  4:01
8 Wholly Cats (Goodman)  2:41
9 Seven Come Eleven (Christian, Goodman)  3:59
10 Moonglow (DeLange, Hudson, Mills)  3:12
11 Flying Home (Goodman, Hampton, Robin)  3:47


[#] Bonus tracks
Previously unreleased

*

Personnel
Kenny Burrell - g
Phil Woods - as & cl [# 8 & 10]
Ron Carter - b
Grady Tate - dr
Mike Mainieri - vb [# 1, 10 & 11]
Richard Wyands - p [# 8]

Recorded at the Van Gelder Studios, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey ; December 15 & 20, 1966 ; January 31, 1967 & March 28, 1967

Friday, September 22, 2017

Henri Renaud - Legendary Saturne recordings

Though France was a haven for beboppers like Kenny Clarke and later provided a home for free jazzers like Sunny Murray, Anthony Braxton and the Art Ensemble of Chicago, the French contribution to the jazz oeuvre has been either neglected or negligible (the Hot Club aside), depending on your viewpoint. Though this re-issue of pianist Henri Renaud's sides for the Saturne label (nothing to do with Sun Ra, by the way) is unlikely to rewrite the history books, it's a strong reminder that though jazz was the sound of Black America, there was much valuable music being made in Europe.Recorded in 1951 for five rare as hen's teeth picture discs, this group (here in various trio, quartet and sextet formations) did feature two visiting Chicagoans, guitarist Jimmy Gourley and tenorist Sandy Mosse and was originally put together for a festival date. On a mixture of standards and originals, the sundry lineups display a relaxed, propulsive swing (mainly down to the legendary bassist Pierre Michelot) which provides springboards for some fine solos. Mosse is very much from the Lester Young school ; his blurred tone and urbane, eloquent solos are enjoyable enough, but the star here is Belgian tenorist Bobby Jaspar. Recorded before his move to the US a few years later (where he played with the likes of Chet Baker, Miles Davis and Kenny Burrell before dying tragically at the age of 37), Jaspar shares Mosse's admiration for Young, but filtered through the airy harmonic interrogations favoured by Warne Marsh. His playing is a model of poise and taste, with a luscious upper register tone that hits the spot.Renaud swings hard (easy to see why he was popular with visiting American jazzers in search of a rhythm section), while Gourley's Charlie Christian inspired solos are enjoyably fluid. The band were obviously enjoying themselves ; Mosse and Jaspar's brief exchanges are delightful, and on "Lady Be Bad" quotes from "Dixie" are tossed all over the place with glee by Gourley and Renaud. The original 1951 picture discs were appalingly bad quality, though engineer Tony Baldwin has done a fantastic digital restoration job in rendering this valuable, unpretentious session listenable ; half an hour of Gallic bop at its finest.
Peter Marsh

Source : http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/release/83n8/

Henri Renaud
The Complete Legendary
Saturne recordings
(1951)

Tracks

1 Milestone n° 2 (Davis)  2:59
2 Godchild (Wallington)  2:55
3 Tenderly (Lawrence, Gross)  2:51
4 So What Could Be New ? (Kahn)  2:59
5 Blue Moon (Rodgers, Hart)  3:07
6 If I Had You (Shapiro, Campbell, Connely)  2:20
7 Any Old Time (Levingston, Melsher, Wolf)  2:56
8 A New Date (Gourley)  3:08
9 Lady Be Bad (Kahn)  3:02
10 Too Marvelous For Words (Mercer, Whiting)  2:43

*

Personnel
Henri Renaud - p
Bobby Jaspar & Sandy Mosse - ts
Jimmy Gourley - g
Pierre Michelot - b
Pierre Lemarchand - dr

Recorded in Paris ; June 1951.

Milt Jackson - Bags & Flutes

Born on Jan. 1, 1923, in Detroit, Jackson's musical beginnings were in the neighborhood gospel churches as a pianist, guitarist, violinist percussionist and singer. He took up the vibraphone in high school. He moved to New York, played with Earl Hines and in 1945, joined Dizzy Gillespie's big band rhythm section, which also included pianist John Lewis, bassist Ray Brown and drummer Kenny Clarke. He worked with Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk and Miles Davis and in 1951 recorded with Gillespie bandmates Lewis, Clarke and Brown. Inspired by that recording, they reformed as the Modern Jazz Quartet in 1952 with Percy Heath replacing Ray Brown and Connie Kay taking the drum chair after the departure of Kenny Clarke in 1955. For the following 50 years the sound of Milton “Bags” Jackson's vibraphone would signature the Modern Jazz Quartet and inspire generations of followers. Jackson's impassioned improvisations and compositions, including “Bluesology” and “Bag's Groove,” helped define the MJQ sound. Jackson recorded many splendid dates as a leader, including, The Ballad Artistry Of Milt Jackson, Ballads And Blues and Big Band Bags, and worked with many jazz immortals, including John Coltrane, Coleman Hawkins, Ray Charles and Quincy Jones. In '99 he fronted an exciting album date with the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra, Explosive! (Qwest). He died in 1999.

Source : http://musicians.allaboutjazz.com/miltjackson

Milt Jackson
Bags & Flutes
(WPCR-27116)

Tracks

1 Bags' New Groove (Jackson)  5:56
2 Sandy (Jackson)  3:52
3 Midget Rod (Jackson)  5:42
4 I'm Afraid the Masquerade is Over (Wrubel, Magidson)  3:42
5 Ghana (Byrd)  5:29
6 Sweet and Lovely (Arnheim, LeMare, Tobias)  4:44
7 Connie's Blues (Jackson)  9:44

*

Personnel
[# 1 & 7] Milt Jackson Sextet
Milt Jackson - vb
Bobby Jaspar - fl
Tommy Flanagan - p
Kenny Burrell - g
Percy Heath - b
Art Taylor - dr
Recorded in New York City ; May 21, 1957
[# 3, 4 & 6] Milt Jackson Sextet
Milt Jackson - vb
Frank Wess - fl
Hank Jones - p
Kenny Burrell - g
Percy Heath - b
Art Taylor - dr
Recorded in New York City ; June 10, 1957
[# 2 & 5] Milt Jackson Sextet
Same as above
Recorded in New York City ; June 17, 1957

Milt Jackson & Wes Montgomery - Bags Meets Wes

Milt Jackson was 38 when, in December 1961, he co-led this superb hard-bop date with the distinctive guitarist Wes Montgomery. A jazzman who was as opinionated as he was gifted, Jackson wouldn't hesitate to tell you exactly what he thought of a musician — so when he praised Montgomery, you knew his praise was genuine. Not surprisingly, the boppers prove to be quite compatible on Bags Meets Wes, which finds them co-leading an all star-quintet that also includes pianist Wynton Kelly, bassist Sam Jones, and drummer Philly Joe Jones (who shouldn't be confused with swing drummer Jo Jones). Although Jackson and Montgomery prove what lyrical ballad players they could be on the standard "Stairway to the Stars," ballads aren't a high priority on this album. Instead, the improvisers put more of their energy into the blues — and the 12-bar format serves them well on "Sam Sack," "Blue Roz," and "S.K.J." Equally strong are hard-swinging versions of Montgomery's "Jingles" and Benny Golson's "Stablemates." Originally released on LP by Riverside in the early 1960s, Bags Meets Wes has been reissued several times over the years. When Fantasy reissued it on CD for the Original Jazz Classics (OJC) series, the label added alternate takes of "Jingles," "Stairway to the Stars," and "Delilah"...
Alex Henderson

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/bags-meets-wes-r141274

Milt Jackson
Wes Montgomery
Bags Meets Wes !
(VICJ-41533)

Tracks

1 S.K.J. (Jackson)  5:17
2 Stablemates (Golson)  5:48
3 Stairway to the Stars [take 3] (Malneck, Parish, Signorelli)  3:38
4 Blue Roz (Montgomery)  4:47
5 Sam Sack (Jackson)  6:06
6 Jingles [take 9] (Montgomery)  6:56
7 Delilah [take 4] (Young)  6:13
8 Stairway to the Stars [take 2] (Malneck, Parish, Signorelli)  3:46
9 Jingles [take 8] (Montgomery)  6:52
10 Delilah [take 3] (Young)  6:18

*

Personnel
Milt Jackson - vb
Wes Montgomery - g
Wynton Kelly - p
Sam Jones - b
Philly Joe Jones - dr

Recorded at Plaza Sound Studios, New York City ; December 18 [# 2-4, 6, 8-9] ; & 19 [other selections], 1961.

Bob Brookmeyer & Stan Getz - Recorded Fall 1961

Shortly after returning to the U.S. (following three years in Copenhagen) Stan Getz had a musical reunion with Bob Brookmeyer. As usual the cool-toned tenor blends in very well with the valve trombonist and, backed by a fine rhythm section (pianist Steve Kuhn, bassist John Neves and drummer Roy Haynes), they perform three Brookmeyer pieces (including one titled "Minuet Circa '61"), two standards and Buck Clayton's "Love Jumped Out." This little-known session is often quite memorable.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/recorded-fall-1961-r568807

Stan Getz
Bob Brookmeyer
Recorded Fall 1961

Tracks

1 Minuet Circa '61 (Brookmeyer)  10:38
2 Who Could Care ? (Brookmeyer)  4:46
3 Nice Work If You Can Get It (Gershwin, Gershwin)  5:58
4 Thump, Thump, Thump (Brookmeyer)  6:52
5 A Nightingale Sang in BerkeleySquare (Maschwitz, Sherwin)  6:59
6 Love Jumped Out (Clayton)  7:46

*

Personnel
Stan Getz - ts
Bob Brookmeyer - tb
Steve Kuhn - p
John Neves - b
Roy Haynes - dr

Recorded at Nola Recording Studio, New York City ; September 12 & 13, 1961

Sonny Stitt, Bud Powell & J.J. Johnson

This superb CD reissues the complete output of three classic bop sessions including five "new" alternate takes. Sonny Stitt (who plays tenor throughout) is heard in a quintet with trombonist J.J. Johnson, pianist John Lewis, bassist Nelson Boyd and drummer Max Roach (playing three Johnson compositions and the original version of John Lewis's "Afternoon in Paris") and in a quartet with the great pianist Bud Powell, bassist Curly Russell and Max Roach. The latter two sessions are highlighted by rapid versions of "All God's Chillun Got Rhythm," "Strike up the Band" and "Fine and Dandy." Highly recommended music
Scott Yanow

http://www.allmusic.com/album/sonny-stitt-bud-powell-jj-johnson-r148199


Sonny Stitt
Bud Powell
J.J. Johnson
(VICJ-41757)

Tracks

1 All God's Chillun Got Rhythm (Jurman, Kahn, Kaper)  2:57
2 Sonny Side (Stitt)  2:21
3 Bud's Blues (Stitt)  2:32
4 Sunset (Stitt)  3:44
5 Fine and Dandy* [take 1] (James, Swift)  2:39
6 Fine and Dandy* [take 2] (James, Swift)  2:38
7 Strike Up the Band* (Gershwin, Gershwin)  3:26
8 I Want to Be Happy* (Caesar, Youmans)  3:09
9 Taking a Chance on Love* (Duke, Fetter, Latouche)  2:32
10 Afternoon in Paris [take 2] (Lewis)  3:03
11 Elora [take 2] (Johnson)  3:03
12 Teapot [take 2] (Johnson)  3:44
13 Blue Mode [take 1] (Johnson)  3:45
14 Blue Mode [take 2] (Johnson)  2:50
15 Afternoon in Paris [take 2] (Lewis)  3:05
16 Elora [take 1] (Johnson)  3:04
17 Teapot [take 1] (Johnson)  2:44

*

Personnel
[# 1-9]
Sonny Stitt - ts
Bud Powell - p
Curley Russell - b
Max Roach - dr
Recorded in New York City ; December 11, 1949 ; & January 26, 1950*
[# 10-17]
Sonny Stitt - ts
J. J. Johnson - tb
John Lewis - p
Nelson Boyd - b
Max Roach - dr
Recorded in New York City ; October 17, 1950

Gabor Szabo - Gypsy '66

Guitarist Gabor Szabo's debut as a leader (after an important stint with the Chico Hamilton Quintet) is surprisingly successful. The reason this LP is a bit of a surprise is that the repertoire (in addition to two originals apiece by the leader and Gary McFarland) has a few unlikely songs by the Beatles ("Yesterday" and "If I Fell") and Burt Bacharach (including "Walk On By"). Usually jazz adaptations of rock songs in the 1960s are lightweight, but Szabo's original sound, the unusual instrumentation (two or three guitars, Sadao Watanabe on flute, Gary McFarland on marimba, bass, drums and percussion) and McFarland's clever arrangements uplift the music. The playing time at 35 minutes is a bit brief, but the performances are better than expected.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/gypsy-66-r148448

Gabor Szabo
with Gary McFarland & Co.
Gypsy '66
(UCCU-5271)

Tracks

1 Yesterday (Lennon, McCartney)  2:31
2 The Last One to Be Loved (Bacharach, David)  3:43
3 The Echo of Love (McFarland)  4:18
4 Gypsy '66 (Szabo)  7:02
5 Flea Market (McFarland)  2:51
6 Walk on By (Bacharach, David)   2:52
7 If I Fell (Lennon, McCartney)  3:21
8 Gypsy Jam (Szabo)  5:01
9 I'm All Smiles (Leonard, Martin)  2:52

*

Personnel
Gabor Szabo - g
Gary McFarland - marmb
Barry Galbraith - g
Sam Brown - g [# 4-9]
Sadao Watanabe - fl
Grady Tate - dr
Al Stinson - b [# 1-3]
Richard Davis - b [# 4-9]
Willie Rodriguez - perc [# 1-3]
Francisco Pozo - perc [# 4-9]

Recorded at the Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey ; November, 1965

See also
http://www.jazzdisco.org/impulse-records/discography-1965-1966/

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Charlie Parker - Intégrale, vol. 5

Even casual jazz fans know that alto saxophonist Charlie “Bird” Parker was one of the founding fathers of modern jazz, that his career was cut short and that most contemporary players are still working through things that he introduced to the music. Many would also be aware that he produced many of his most famous recordings during the late ‘40s. Several of these appear on this set, about half of which comes from Bird’s last three studio sessions for Savoy, one of the two fledgling indie labels that held “exclusive” deals with him at the time. Shortly after the last of these sessions, Parker signed with Mercury and producer Norman Granz, with whom he would remain until the end. And while he certainly recorded a lot of significant music for Granz, his legacy is defined by the Savoy and Dial work and the best of his live recordings. That brings us to the fact that this “complete” set really makes no pretense at being so, though it does aim to steer a sensible course through waters that have been muddy ever since Jazz at Massy Hall first appeared with the name “Charlie Chan” on the cover in 1953. The idea is to exclude most of the privately made live recordings for reasons of sound quality. Thus we do not get the high-octane but low-fidelity Onyx club recordings that were released as Bird on 52nd St. and other such informal recordings. But this series will certainly make the process of getting most of Parker’s music in one place easier than it has been. The sound quality is quite good, as are Alain Tercinet’s notes. Tercinet doesn’t mind the occasional far-reaching statement, but as these are all of the well-considered variety, they add rather than detract. One can only envy younger listeners who will be able to start with this series and add to it as they wish. The Savoy sessions are presented as recorded, beginning with the 12/21/1947 quintet date (just four days after the last Dial session, with JJ Johnson), with all the alternate tracks in sequence. Honestly, a collection of this sort can’t really do things any other way and for those who know the music well, it’s always intriguing to hear Parker and his working band (trumpeter Miles Davis, bassist Curley Russell, drummer Max Roach and either Duke Jordan or John Lewis on piano) wrestle the tunes to the ground. Parker challenged himself as a soloist almost every time out, with the inevitable result that he sometimes painted himself into a corner and had to cut things short. Just as often, promising improvs were marred by reed problems. And if Parker would sometimes make faux pas, Davis at age 21 or 22 could hardly be expected not to, though by late 1947 he had matured considerably from his debut with Bird two years earlier. These sessions did not produce many of Parker’s most famous compositions, but some of the writing is quite innovative, like “Ah-Leu-Cha” and its use of counterpoint (in which John Lewis is said to have had a hand) or pieces like “Another Hair-Do” for the way composed and improvised material is combined. One tune that did achieve classic status was the largely improvised “Parker’s Mood”. But probably the biggest attraction was the outrageous blowing on tracks like “Bird Gets the Worm” and “Klaunstance”, which sounded as wild to 1948 ears as Ornette Coleman would a decade later. In September 1948, Parker’s quintet was recorded doing a broadcast from the Royal Roost and discographies list another 16 such broadcast dates over the next six months. But how many will wind up being included in the Fremeaux series remains to be seen, as only two of the five broadcasts from the timespan covered have been included here (sound quality considerations, again). For the Dec. 11th date, Al Haig has replaced Duke Jordan on piano. Haig had worked with Parker in 1945-46 so the transition was fairly seamless. Rather more serious was the sudden departure of Miles Davis, who was replaced by Kenny Dorham just in time for the Christmas day broadcast that accounts for most of the third disc here. Given the fact that Parker hated rehearsals, one has to marvel at how well Dorham handled himself right from the start. The Royal Roost recordings are valuable for the opportunity they provide to hear Bird’s working band during what was a time of transition for them and phenomenal creativity for him. The last five tracks on CD three date from the Metronome All-Star session of January 1949, which featured modernists of various stripes, from beboppers to cool-schoolers like Lennie Tristano, whose typically gnarly “Victory Ball” is entertaining for many reasons, including Davis’ earnest attempt at a high-note climax to his solo.
Duck Baker (The New York City Jazz Record)

Source : https://www.fremeaux.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&category_id=64&flypage=shop.flypage&product_id=1431&option=com_virtuemart

Charlie Parker
Intégrale, vol. 5
"Parker's Mood"
(1947-1949)

Tracks

Cd. 1

CHARLIE PARKER
1 The Bird (Parker)  4:46

CHARLIE PARKER WITH THE NEAL HEFTI ORCHESTRA
2 Repetition (Hefti)  3:00

CHARLIE PARKER ALL STARS
3 Another Hair Do (Parker)  0:15
4 Another Hair Do (Parker)  0:44
5 Another Hair Do (Parker)  1:05
6 Another Hair Do [master] (Parker)  2:39
7 Bluebird (Parker)  2:54
8 Bluebird [master] (Parker)  2:52
9 Klaunstance [master] (Parker)  2:46
10 Bird Gets the Worm (Parker)  3:01
11 Bird Gets the Worm (Parker)  0:11
12 Bird Gets the Worm [master] (Parker)  2:36

CHARLIE PARKER ALL STARS
(Radio Transcription)
13 Announcer  1:23
14 52nd Street Theme (Monk)  4:18
15 Koko (Parker)  3:25

CHARLIE PARKER ALL STARS
16 Barbados (Parker)  2:39
17 Barbados (Parker)  0:46
18 Barbados (Parker)  2:37
19 Barbados [master] (Parker)  2:31
20 Ah-Leu-Cha (Parker)  0:39
21 Ah-Leu-Cha [master] (Parker)  2:57
22 Constellation (Parker)  0:20
23 Constellation (Parker)  2:31
24 Constellation (Parker)  2:06
25 Constellation (Parker)  0:22
26 Constellation [master] (Parker)  2:27
27 Parker's Mood (Parker)  3:22
28 Parker's Mood (Parker)  2:24
29 Parker's Mood [master] (Parker)  3:01

CHARLIE PARKER QUINTET
(Private Recording)
30 Drifting on a Reed (Big Foot) (Parker)  4:25

*


Cd. 2

CHARLIE PARKER ALL-STARS
1 Perhaps (Parker)  3:03
2 Perhaps (Parker)  0:27
3 Perhaps (Parker)  2:09
4 Perhaps (Parker)  0:19
5 Perhaps (Parker)  0:40
6 Perhaps (Parker)  2:18
7 Perhaps [master] (Parker)  2:33
8 Marmaduke (Parker)  1:15
9 Marmaduke (Parker)  0:52
10 Marmaduke (Parker)  2:54
11 Marmaduke (Parker)  0:59
12 Marmaduke (Parker)  2:58
13 Marmaduke (Parker)  0:35
14 Marmaduke (Parker)  0:48
15 Marmaduke [master] (Parker)  2:46
16 Steeplechase [master] (Parker)  3:04
17 Merry-Go-Round (Parker)  2:20
18 Merry-Go-Round [master] (Parker)  2:26

CHARLIE PARKER ALL-STARS
(Radio Transcription)
19 Announcer  1:03
20 Groovin' High (Gillespie)  5:22
21 Big Foot (Parker)  5:0
22 Ornithology (Parker, Harris)  5:55
23 On a Slow Boat to China (Loesser)  5:50
24 Announcer  0:33
25 Hot House (Dameron)  4:33
26 Salt Peanuts (Gillespie, Clarke)  4:10
27 Announcer  1:23
28 Chasin' the Bird (Parker)  5:12
29 Out of Nowhere (Green, Heyman)  3:34
30 How High the Moon (Lewis Hamlton)  2:55

*

Cd. 3

CHARLIE PARKER WITH MACHITO & HIS
AFRO-CUBAN ORCHESTRA
1 No Noise (part. 1 & 2) (Martee)  5:54
2 Mango Mangue (Valdez)  2:54

CHARLIE PARKER ALL-STARS
(Radio Transcription)
3 Announcer  1:16
4 Half Nelson (Davis)  5:18
5 White Christmas (Berlin)  5:24
6 Little Willie Leaps (Davis)  3:39
7 Announcer  1:16
8 Be-Bop (Gillespie)  4:11
9 On a Slow Boat to China (Loesser)  4:59
10 Ornithology (Parker, Harris)  4:39
12 East of the Sun (Bowman)  5:01
13 Cheryl (Parker)  4:18
14 Announcer  1:05
15 How High the Moon (Lewis, Hamilton)  4:45

METRONOME ALL STARS
16 Overtime (Rugulo)  3:10
17 Overtime (Rugulo)  4:38
18 Victory Ball (Tristano)  2:44
19 Victory Ball (Tristano)  2:41
20 Victory Ball (Tristano)  4:19

*

Personnel
[Cd. 1, # 1]
Charlie Parker - as
Hank Jones - p
Ray Brown - b
Shelly Manne - dr
Recorded in New York City ; December 1947
[Cd. 1, # 2]
Collective personnel, featuring
Charlie Parker - as
Al Porcino, Ray Wetzel, Doug Mettome - tp
Bill Harris, Bart Varsalona - tb
Vincent Jacobs - fr hrn
John La Porta - cl
[...]
Tony Aless - p
Curley Russel - b
Shelly Mane - dr
Diego Iborra - cng
Neal Hefti - arr. cond.
Recorded in New York ; December 1947
[Cd. 1, # 3-12]
Miles Davis - tp
Charlie Parker - as
Duke Jordan - p
Tommy Potter - b
Max Roach - dr
Recorded in Detroit ; December 21, 1947
[Cd. 1, # 13-15]
Same as above, except
Tadd Dameron - p, replaces Jordan
Recorded at Royal Roost, New York ; September 4, 1948
[Cd. 1, # 16-29]
Same as above, except
John Lewis - p, replaces Dameron
Recorded in New York City ; September 18, 1948
[Cd. 1, # 30]
Same as above, except
Duke Jordan - p, replaces Lewis
Recorded at Three Deuces, New York City ; circa March 1948
[Cd. 2, # 1-18]
Miles Davis - tp
Charlie Parker - as
John Lewis - p
Curley Russell - b
Max Roach - dr
Recorded at New York City ; September 24, 1948
[Cd. 2, # 19-30]
Same as above, except
Al Haig - p, replaces Lewis
Tommy Potter - b, replaces Russell
Recorded at Royal Roost, New York City ; December 11, 12 & 18, 1948
[Cd. 3, # 1 & 2]
Collective personnel, featuring
Charlie Parker - as
Flip Philips - ts
Paquito Davilla, Bob Woodlen - tp
Gene Johnson, Freddie Skerritt - as
[...]
José Mangual - bng
Luis Miranda - cng
Umbaldo Nieto - tbl
Machito - mrc
Recorded in New York ; December 20, 1948
[Cd. 3, # 3-6]
Kenny Dorham - tp
Charlie Parker - as
Al Haig - p
Tommy Potter - b
Max Roach - dr
Symphony Sid - mc
Recorded at Royal Roost, New York City ; December 25, 1948
[Cd. 3, # 7-13]
Same as above, except
Joe Harris - dr, replaces Roach
Same place as above ; January 1, 1949
[Cd. 3, # 14-15]
Same as above, except
Conte Candoli - tp
Bennie Green - tb
Charlie Ventura - ts
Curley Russel - b
Shell Manne, Ed. Shaugnessy - dr, are added ?
Same pace & date as above ?
[Cd. 3, # 16-20]
Dizzy Gillespie, Fats Navarro [out # 18-20], Miles Davis [out # 18-20] - tp
J. J. Johnson [out # 18-20], Kai Winding - tb
Buddy deFranco - cl
Charlie Parker - as
Charlie Ventura - ts
Ernie Caceres [out # 18-20] - bs
Lennie Tristano - p
Billy Bauer - g
Eddie Safranski - b
Shelly Manne - dr
Pete Rugolo - cond. arr.
Recorded in New York City ; January 3, 1949