Wednesday, September 17, 2064

Saturday, July 22, 2017

A Summer Night with Joe Pass

During the last few years of his life, guitarist Joe Pass enjoyed having reunions with the same musicians who played with him 25 years earlier for the classic For Django recording : rhythm guitarist John Pisano, bassist Jim Hughart and drummer Colin Bailey. This 1989 recording could almost be called For Django 2, for it is the same vein as the original. Pass takes his remake of "For Django" unaccompanied and performs four of Django's tunes, along with five standards from the 1930s and three originals. Pisano, who was instrumental in organizing the session and the repertoire, sticks to acoustic guitar, while Pass alternates between acoustic and electric. Although Joe Pass' main influence was Charlie Christian and he really does not sound like Reinhardt, he manages to evoke the spirit of Django while swinging in his own fashion. It is particularly nice hearing such tunes as "Belleville," the haunting "Tears" and "For Django" in newer versions.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/summer-nights-mw0000309426

Joe Pass
Summer Nights

Tracks

1 Summer Night (Dubin, Warren)  4:20
2 Anouman (Reinhardt)  4:40
3 Douce Ambiance (Reinhardt)  4:52
4 For Django (Pass)  3:05
5 D-Joe (Pisano)  3:09
6 I Got Rhythm (Gershwin, Gershwin)  4:41
7 E-Blue Eyes (Pass)  5:38
8 Belleville (Reinhardt)  3:57
9 In My Solitude (DeLange, Ellington, Mills)  3:26
10 Tears (Razao le Viver) (Deodato)  4:48
11 In a Sentimental Mood (Ellington, Kurtz, Mills)  2:51
12 Them There Eyes (Pinkard, Tauber, Tracey)  2:28

*

Personnel
Joe Pass - ac & el g
John Pisano - ac g
Jim Hughart - b
Colin Bailey - dr

Recorded at Group IV Recording, Hollywood, California ; December 1989.

The Touch of Teddy Wilson

When the album The Touch of Teddy Wilson was made in 1957, Wilson was already a big Jazz star, with a long career behind him. He had been a member of the celebrated Benny Goodman trio/quartet, the musical conductor of numerous small group studio sessions with stars like Billie Holiday, Lester Young and Ben Webster, and a prolific concert and recording artist in many other formats. Many of Teddy Wilson's best remembered recordings, however, are in the trio format. This is the case with The Touch of Teddy Wilson, the first trio album he made after his long 1956 studio sessions with drummer Jo Jones, who had departed the group shortly before.

Source : http://www.discogs.com/Teddy-Wilson-The-Touch-Of-Teddy-Wilson/release/4798443

Teddy Wilson
Touch of Teddy Wilson
&
Newport Jazz Festival
1957

Tracks

1 Avalon (Desylva, Jolson, Rose)  2:38
2 Little Things That Mean So Much (Adamson, Wilson)  3:05
3 'S Wonderful (Gershwin, Gershwin)  4:00
4 Someone to Watch Over Me (Gershwin, Gershwin)  4:02
5 Jeepers Creepers (Mercer, Warren)  4:11
6 If You Are But a Dream (Bonx, Fulton, Jaffe)  2:50
7 Bye Bye Blues (Bennett, Gray, Hamm, Lown)  2:51
8 Sunny Morning (Wilson)  2:54
9 Talking to the Moon (Baskette, Little)  2:47
10 Dream House (Cowan)  2:47
11 Sometimes I'm Happy (Grey, Robin, Youman)  4:34
12 That Old Feeling (Brown, Fain)  2:47
13 Stompin' at the Savoy (Goodman, Sampson, Webb)  4:00
14 Air Mail Special (Christian, Goodman, Mundy)  3:49
15 Basin Street Blues (Williams)  5:09
16 I Got Rhythm (Gershwin, Gershwin)  4:21
17 Sweet Georgia Brown (Bernie, Casey, Pinkard)  6:00


*

Personnel
[# 1-12] The Touch of Teddy Wilson
Teddy Wilson - p
Arvell Shaw - b
Roy Burns - dr
Recorded at Fine Sound Studio, New York ; August 12, 1957
[# 13-17] Bonus Tracks
Teddy Wilson - p
Milt Hinton - b
Specs Powell - dr
Gerry Mulligan - bs [# 17 only]
Recorded at the Newport Jazz Festival, Newport, R.I. ; July 6, 1957

Friday, July 21, 2017

Gerry Mulligan - Olympia, Oct. 6th, 1962

There was a dense crowd for the concerts at the Olympia in Paris on Saturday, October 6, where two highly-esteemed. groups were to appear, opposites perhaps in spirit, but sharing nevertheless a common denominator of talent. Opening the show, the champion of funky jazz, Horace Silver, to be followed after the intermission by the Gerry Mulligan quartet. Two shows were planned, one at 6pm, the other at midnight. We can only hope that in the near future we may have the opportunity to hear the superb demonstration of swing provided by Horace Silver (along with Blue Mitchell and Junior Cook). As for Gerry Mulligan, we need wait no longer, this compact disc brings the concert "into your own living room."
Gerry Mulligan had created great astonishment on his debut in Paris, presenting at the Salon du Jazz in 1954 his "pianoless quartet" — practically an attempt at the impossible, double bass alone providing the harmonic support for the single-line soloists.
There had been a precedent in the fairly recent past, with the quartet co-led by Sidney Bechet and Muggsy Spanier (with guitar and bass), but it was nevertheless Mulligan, along with Chet Baker, in 1952 who provoked astonishment with this move whose impact in the jazz world was considerable. It has never been very clear whether Mulligan deliberately decided to do without a piano, or whether circumstances pushed him to it. One statement by Mulligan suggests the latter. He told a journalist that the stage of a club where he was playing in Los Angeles was so cramped that there was no room for the concert piano he wanted. Whatever the case, the formula was surprising and attractive, all the more so in that it was the velvet trumpet of Baker which counterpointed p Mulligan's deep-toned saxophone. Subsequently the valve trombone of Bob Brookmeyer and then the trumpet of Art Farmer were his partners...
André Clergeat, Co-author of the Dictionnaire du Jazz (booklet)

Gerry Mulligan
Quartet
Olympia, Oct. 6th, 1962

Tracks

1 Spring is Sprung (Mulligan)  8:55
2 Five Brothers (Mulligan)  6:04
3 Subterranean Blues (Mulligan)  11:21
4 Darn that Dream (DeLAnge, VanHeusen)  7:42
5 Blues Port (Farmer)  10:06
6 Utter Chaos (Mulligan)  1:12

*

Personnel
Gerry Mulligan - bs & p [# 1 & 4]
Bob Brookmeyer - tb & p [# 3]
Bill Crow - b
Gus Johnson - dr

Recorded at the Olympia, Paris ; October 6, 1962

Johnny Smith - Moonlight in Vermont

This may be the greatest "forgotten" jazz album of its time. "Moonlight In Vermont" was originally released as the B side of a single in '52. Its lush, gorgeous, laid back groove — caressed into life by Smith and Stan Getz — made it an immediate radio hit and it was voted Jazz Record Of The Year by Downbeat.
Over subsequent decades, "Moonlight In Vermont" and the eponymous album to which it gave birth (originally two 10" issues titled Jazz At NBC ) have gradually faded from view : Smith, a studio musician at NBC and regular performer at Birdland for much of the Fifties, more or less retired from performance in the early Sixties and his work has since been out of catalogue more often than it has been in.
An uncannily symmetrical 52 years after its first release, Moonlight In Vermont must now be a strong contender for Jazz Reissue Of The Year. The sixteen tracks, recorded between March '52 and August '53, include the original eight with Getz and a further eight with Getz replaced by either Zoot Sims or Paul Quinchette. The music is meticulously arranged, the harmonic development rich and sophisticated, and the performances, particularly those of Smith, Getz and the "first choice" rhythm section of Gold, Safranski and Lamond, technically awesome; the up-tempo unison passages by Smith and Getz especially are jawdroppingly masterful.
Yet Smith never uses technique for its own sake. Throughout, his rapid fire single note runs (every bit as jetspeed as Tal Farlow's, but more sparingly used) and innovative chordal theme statements and solos (truly harmolodic inventions) are just — there's no other word — heavenly. Like the title track, much of the album is lush, gorgeous and laid back, but there is plenty of fire and energy here too.
Still, gloriously and evocatively, in the original mono, the album has been lovingly remastered in 24-bit by Malcolm Addey. If you like Django, Charlie Christian and/or Wes Montgomery, do yourself an immense favour and check it out.
Kinda Interesting Factoid : Somewhat unexpectedly, Johnny Smith is the composer of "Walk Don't Run," that massive, twanging, primeval rock 'n' roll hit for the Ventures in '60. The royalties allowed Smith to relocate from NYC to bucolic Colorado. His lifestyle gain perhaps, but our listening loss for sure.
Chris May

Source : https://www.allaboutjazz.com/moonlight-in-vermont-johnny-smith-roulette-jazz-review-by-chris-may.php

Johnny Smith
Moonlight in Vermont
(WPCR-29024)

Tracks

1 Where or When (Hart, Rodgers)  2:28
2 Tabu (Lecuona, Russell, Stillman)  2:42
3 Moonlight in Vermont (Blackburn, Suessdorf)  3:16
4 Jaguar (Smith)  2:34
5 Sometimes I'm Happy (Grey, Robin, Youmans)  2:20
6 Stars Fell on Alabama (Parish, Perkins)  3:06
7 Nice Work If You Can Get It (Gershwin, Gershwin)  2:27
8 Tenderly (Gross, Lawrence)  3:27
9 Jaguar [alt.] (Smith)  2:30
10 I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance With You (Crosby, Washington, Young)  3:11
11 Vilia (Lehar)  2:43
12 My Funny Valentine (Hart, Rodgers)  2:40
13 Yesterdays (Harbach, Kern)  2:53
14 Cavu (Smith)  2:15
15 I'll Be Around (Wilder)  2:48
16 Cherokee (Noble)  2:47

*

Personnel
[# 1-4]
Johnny Smith - g
Stan Getz - ts
Sanford Gold - p
Eddie Safranski - b
Don Lamond - dr
Recorded in New York City ; March 11, 1952
[# 9-12]
Same as above, except
Zoot Sims - ts, replaces Getz
Recorded in New York City ; April 1952
[# 5-8]
Johnny Smith - g
Stan Getz - ts
Sanford Gold - p
Bob Carter - b
Morey Feld - dr
Recorded in New York City ; November 1952
[# 13-16]
Johnny Smith - g
Paul Quinichette - ts
Sanford Gold - p
Arnold Fishkin - b
Don Lamond - dr
Recorded in New York City ; August 1953

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Jimmy Raney - Solo

When Don Schlitten suggested that I do a solo album, my first reaction was apprehension. Just guitar for forty minutes ! After discussing the idea with him and several others, I decided to take the plunge, mainly because he has been invariably right in his past recommendations.
The problem was to create some sort of variety. I finally decided to try to make the pieces as different from one another as possible, and also to make use of overdubbing. For this I used both the regular guitar and an F guitar which is pitched a fifth lower than usual. The opening piece, "The Fugue", is a misnomer and is not really a fugue.
It is fugal and canonic in nature, but doesn't develop in the strict fugal manner, and also is not at all times a canon. The subject is stated, and then enters at a lower pitch in the second voice. It continues as a canon for eight bars. A the ninth bar the first voice picks up the part of the second voice a third higher. The eleventh and twelfth bars are in unison, and the last four are free counterpoint. This sixteen bar phrase is then repeated, followed by a sixteen bar bridge which is improvised, then there is a return to the theme for sixteen more bars. The central portion of the piece is improvised, but sticking to the material and style of the written part as much as possible. Finally there is a return to the printed page ending with an “Amen”, but in C major instead of C minor.
Whereas "The Fugue" was some-what formally structured, "New Signal" is freely improvised on a given theme and chord pattern. Also it is solo guitar. It begins with a ruba- to chorus and then into tempo, returning to rubato again near the end. Generally speaking, I tried for fleet lines punctuated by thick block-like chords. Irving Berlin's "How Deep Is The Ocean" brings in the F guitar. The first guitar plays melody and solos first, with the F guitar providing a walking bass line. Notice in all the tracks using the F guitar, how smoothly it changes roles with the regular guitar, from background to solo and back. This is not something that I tried for, rather it seems to be a characteristic of the instrument due to it's in-between range...
Jimmy Raney, from the booklet


Jimmy Raney
Solo

Tracks

1 The Fugue (Raney) 6:58
2 New Signal (Raney) 6:41
3 How Deep is The Ocean (Berlin) 6:53
4 The Way You Look Tonight (Kern, Fields) 4:29
5 Wait Till You See Her (Rodgers, Hart) 5:53
6 Smoke Gets In Your Eyes (Kern, Harbach) 6:01
7 Blues Variations (Raney) 6:30
8 Suzanne (Raney)  4:53
9 The End of a Love Affair (Redding)  4:11

*

Jimmy Raney - g & F-g

Recorded in New York ; December 20, 1976 [# 1-7] ; February 9, 1975 [bonus tracks # 8-9], first released in Jimmy Raney "The Influence", Xanadu 116

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Bud Shank & Bill Perkins

Two of the stars of cool jazz (both of whom had long careers), Bud Shank and Bill Perkins, are featured to various degrees throughout this 1998 CD reissue. Shank, who during the 1980's and 90's stuck exclusively to his increasingly passionate alto, in the 1950's was practically the epitome of West Coast jazz. His cool tones on alto and his fluid flute were utilized on many dates; the main set on this CD also finds him switching in spots to tenor and baritone. Perkins, always a versatile reed soloist, is best-known for his tenor playing but during that date he also plays alto and (on two versions of "Fluted Columns) there are some rare examples of his flute. Shank and Perkins team up quite effectively with pianist Hampton Hawes, bassist Red Mitchell and drummer Mel Lewis for the May 2, 1955 session which includes a trio feature for Hawes ("I Hear Music"). Four numbers from Feb. 19, 1956 (with Shank on flute and alto, pianist Russ Freeman, bassist Carson Smith, drummer Shelly Manne and, on "Brother, Can You Spare A Dime," Perkins on tenor) are actually from a session led by Freeman but never completed and were only put out previously on samplers. "Angel Eyes" (by a quartet with Perkins and pianist Jimmy Rowles) is a leftover track from a later date as is "Sonny Speaks" which showcases Rowles in a trio without Perkins. This CD concludes with the one surviving number ("Ain't Got A Dime To My Name") surviving from a truncated Perkins quartet set from 1958. Taken as a whole, there are many rewarding solos to be heard by Shank, Perkins and the piano players on these formerly rare selections even if the CD falls short of being classic.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:3xfyxqyjldde

Bud Shank 
Bill Perkins
Bud Shank and Bill Perkins

Tracks

1 Paradise (Brown, Clifford)  3:03
2 Fluted Columns (Shank)  4:18
3 I Hear Music (Lane, Loesser)  3:31
4 Royal Garden Blues (Williams, Williams)  3:56
5 A Sinner Kissed an Angel (David)  3:17
6 It Had to Be You (Jones, Kahn)  3:16
7 Fluted Columns [alt. take] (Shank)  3:31
8 I Hear Music [Trio Version] (Lane, Loesser)  3:25
9 Brother, Can You Spare a Dime ? (Gorney, Harburg)  4:42
10 Blues in the Night (Arlen, Mercer)   7:21
11 Bojangles of Harlem (Fields, Kern)  2:46
12 It's a New World (Arlen, Gershwin)  4:40
13 Angel Eyes (Brent, Dennis)  3:38
14 Sonny Speaks (Berman)  3:44
15 Ain't Got a Dime to My Name (Ho-Hum) (Burke, VanHeusen)  3:36

*

Personnel
[#1-8]
Bud Shank - fl, as, ts & bs
Bill Perkins - fl, as & ts
Hampton Hawes - p
Red Mitchell - b
Mel Lewis - dr
[# 9-12]
Bud Shank - fl & as
Bill Perkins - ts [# 9]
Russ Freeman - p
Carson Smith - b
Shelly Manne - dr
[#13-17]
Bill Perkins - ts
Jimmy Rowles - p
Ben Tucker [# 13-14] or Leroy Vinnegar [# 15] - b
Mel Lewis - dr

Recorded at Capitol Studios, Los Angeles on May 2, 1955 [# 1-8] ; [# 9-12] at the Music Box Theatre, Los Angeles on February 19, 1956 ; [# 13-14] Los Angeles on December 11, 1956 ; [# 15] same place on May 1958.

Saturday, June 24, 2017

Herbie Mann/Sahib Shihab - The Jazz We Heard Last Summer

This split LP pairs a sextet led by multi-instrumentalist Sahib Shihab with another under the direction of Herbie Mann. Big names all the way around on this one. On the Shihab session, John Jenkins and Clifford Jordan round out the front line, while Hank Jones, Addison Farmer, and Dannie Richmond hold down the rhythm. Mann, on the other hand, is joined by Phil Woods, Eddie Costa, Joe Puma, Wilbur Ware, and Jerry Segal. Nothing overly surprising here, but one can expect quality performances by all. The album's opener, "S.M.T.W.T.F.S.S. Blues," and Jenkins' own "Rockaway" are especially pleasing themes, as is the Phil Woods contribution, "World Wide Boots." Generally speaking, the Shihab tracks are a bit meatier, causing the momentum to taper off toward the end of the disc. This should not, however, sway fans of late-'50s bop, as a number of the scene's top players are featured on this admittedly short set.
Brandon Burke

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:0xfrxqwgldhe

Herbie Mann
 Sahib Shihab
The Jazz We Heard Last Summer

Tracks

1 S.M.T.W.T.F.S.S. Blues (Shihab)  6:36
2 Rockaway (Jenkins)  6:43
3 The Things We Did Last Summer (Cahn, Styne)  7:03
4 Green Stamp Monsta (Mann)  7:58
5 World Wide Boots (Woods)  8:22

*

Personnel
[# 1-4] Sahib Shihab Sextet
John Jenkins - as
Clifford Jordan - ts
Sahib Shihab - bs
Hank Jones - p
Addison Farmer - b
Dannie Richmond - dr
Recorded in New York City ; June 6, 1957
[# 4-5] Herbie Mann Sextet
Herbie Mann - fl & ts
Phil Woods - as
Eddie Costa - vb & p
Joe Puma - g
Wilbur Ware - b
Jerry Segal - dr
Recorded in New York City ; May 2, 1957

Friday, June 23, 2017

Sir Charles Thompson - His Personal Vanguard Recordings

The elegantly nicknamed Sir Charles Thompson was one of the few musicians associated with swing who was able to make a graceful, wholehearted transition to bop at the time the revolution was happening. His piano style is light-fingered and spare in a witty, inventive, Basie-descended bop manner, and he was able to adapt it effectively to the organ. Thompson's first instrument was the violin, but the piano beckoned when he was a teenager, and he started working with territory bands in the midwest in the late 1930s. He briefly joined Lionel Hampton in 1940, but left in order to work with small groups and contribute arrangements to Basie, Hampton, Fletcher Henderson, Jimmy Dorsey, and other bands. While working in New York's 52nd St. clubs during World War II, he began to pick up on the beginnings of bop. In 1944-1945, Thompson played in the Coleman Hawkins/Howard McGhee band, journeying to Hollywood with them to record several terrific swing/bop sides for Capitol (now on Hollywood Stampede) and also his lively tune "Ladies' Lullaby" for Asch. So thoroughly had Thompson absorbed the language and ethos of bop that he was able to write one of the quintessential classics of the idiom, "Robbins' Nest," which became a hit for Sir Charles' next employer, Illinois Jacquet, and inspired a haunting, pathbreaking Gil Evans arrangement for Claude Thornhill in 1947.
Thompson recorded a number of small group albums for Vanguard in the '50s, and two more for Columbia in 1959 and 1960, and appeared as a sideman for Buck Clayton and Jimmy Rushing, but spent much of the '50s freelancing as an organist. He toured the U.S., Canada, and Puerto Rico in the '60s leading small groups, as well as Europe with Clayton. Following a bout of ill health, he returned to action in 1975. His early bop sides for Apollo, including some with Hawkins and Charlie Parker, are available on the Delmark reissue Takin' Off.
Richard S. Ginell

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/artist/sir-charles-thompson-mn0000747654/biography

Sir Charles Thompson
His Personal Vanguard Recordings

Tracks

Cd. 1

1 Bop This (Thompson)  3:43
2 Memories of You (Blake, azaf)  5:23
3 Oh Joe ! (Newman)  6:33
4 For the Ears (Thompson)  11:13
5 Swingtime in the Rockies (Mundy)  4:01
6 Honeysuckle Rose (Waller, Razaf)  6:22
7 These Foolish Things (Strachey, Link, Marvell)  5:25
8 Sweet Georgia Brown (Pinkard, Bernie, Casey)  4:05

*

Cd. 2

1 It's the Talk of the Town (Livingston, Symes, Neiburg)  4:35
2 Fore ! (Thompson)  6:53
3 Dynaflow (Thompson)  4:49
4 Under the Sweetheart Tree (Thompson, Evans)  5:13
5 Ready for Freddie (Thompson)  2:55
6 Sonny Howard's Blues (Thompson)  5:23
7 Best by Test (Best)  2:50
8 Hey There (Adler, Ross)  5:13
9 Love for Sale (Porter)  6:24
10 Stompin' at the Savoy (Samson, Webb, Goodman, Razaf)  3:12
11 Mr. Sandman (Ballard)  2:47


*

Personnel
[Cd. 1, # 1-4]
Pete Brown - as
Joe Newman - tp
Benny Powell - tb
Sir Charles Thompson - p
Gene Ramey - b
Osie Johnson - dr
Recorded in New York City ; December 30, 1953
[Cd. 1, # 5-8]
Sir Charles Thompson - p
Freddie Greene - g
Walter Page - b
Jo Jones - dr
Recorded in New York City ; January 22, 1954
[Cd. 2, # 1-5]
Coleman Hawkins - ts
Earl Warren - as
Emmett Berry - tp
Benny Morton - tb
Sir Charles Thompson - p
Steve Jordan - g
Aaron Bell - b
Osie Johnson - dr
Recorded in New York City ; August 16, 1954
[Cd. 2, # 6-11]
Sir Charles Thompson - p
Skeeter Best - g
Aaron Bell - b
Recorded in New York City ; February 16, 1955

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Benny Goodman - The Complete Capitol Trios

The Complete Capitol Trios is a long-overdue reissue of the five trio sessions Benny Goodman led for Capitol Records. The five sessions are easily broken down into two categories  recordings from 1947 and recordings from 1954. The highlights of the 1947 recordings are sessions with pianist Teddy Wilson and drummer Jimmy Crawford. This provided Goodman an opportunity to reunite with Wilson who he had toured with in the late '30s in a trio with drummer Gene Krupa. Goodman and Wilson have a real ease to their interaction and the results are positively joyful. There are three other recordings from 1947, featuring pianist Jimmy Rowles and drummer Tom Romersa ; these are good, but not quite as delightful as their 1947 companions. However, the 1954 recordings — all featuring pianist Mel Powell, four featuring drummer Eddie Grady, and two featuring drummer Bobby Donaldson — are equally wonderful, filled with good humor, elegant flair, and magical interludes. These sessions have been out of circulation for too long, but The Complete Capitol Trios is so well-done — and its fidelity is so good — that the wait was certainly worthwhile.
Thomas Erlewine

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/the-complete-capitol-trios-mw0000245593

Benny Goodman
The Complete Capitol Trios
(1947-1954)

Tracks

1 Blue (And Broken Hearted) (Clarke, Handman, Leslie)  2:58
2 After Hours (Hawkins, Parrish)  3:08
3 All I Do Is Dream of You (Brown, Freed)  2:22
4 I'll Never Be the Same (Kahn, Malneck, Signorelli)  3:16
5 Bye Bye Pretty Baby (Gardner, Hamilton)  2:28
6 Shoe Shine Boy (Cahn, Chaplin)  2:50
7 At Sundown (Donaldson)  2:27
8 When You're Smiling (The Whole World Smiles With You) (Fisher, Goodwin, Shay)  2:36
9 All I Do Is Dream of You (Brown, Freed)  2:40
10 Stompin' at the Savoy (Goodman, Razaf, Sampson, Webb)  2:51
11 Mean to Me (Ahlert, Turk)  3:00
12 Puttin' on the Ritz (Berlin)  3:04
13 I Never Knew I Could Love Anybody (Like I'm Loving You) (Egan, Marsh, Pitts)  3:08
14 Lazy River (Arodin, Carmichael)  3:02
15 There'll Be Some Changes Made (Higgins, Overstreet)  3:10
16 Ev'rything I've Got (Belongs to You) (Hart, Rodgers)  3:54
17 But Not For Me (Gershwin, Gershwin)  2:25
18 Margie (Conrad, Davis, Robinson)  2:43
19 Rose Room (Hickman, Williams)  3:57
20 (What Can I Say) After I Say I'm Sorry ? (Donaldson, Lyman)  3:09

*

Personnel
[# 1-6]
Benny Goodman - cl
Teddy Wilson - p
Jimmy Crawford - dr
Recorded in New York City ; November 7, 1947
[# 7-10]
Same as above
Recorded in New York City ; November 17, 1947
[# 11-14]
Same as above, except
Jimmy Rowles - p, replaces Wilson
Recorded at Radio Recorders, Los Angeles ; April 16, 1947
[# 15-18]
Benny Goodman - cl
Mel Powell - p
Eddie Grady - dr
Recorded at the Riverside Plaza Hotel, New York City ; January 28, 1954
[# 19-20]
Same as above, except
Bobby Donaldson - dr, replaces Grady
Recorded same place as above ; November 16, 1954

Mary Osborne - A Girl and Her Guitar '59

Mary Osborne (1921-1992) began her musical career in Minot, North Dakota before she was 11 years old. In a few years she was doing radio work and soon was playing with some of the big bands then playing in the upper Midwest. She met Charlie Christian in North Dakota and she was heavily influenced by his style. But, like most of the great players she also developed her own unique approach and sound.
In the late 1930’s she moved east to Pittsburgh and later to New York. There her talents as a jazz player caught the ear of some of the jazz greats like Coleman Hawkins, Dizzy Gillespie and Art Tatum all of whom used her as rhythm and solo guitarist in their bands. In the period of 1945 – 1947 she made a number of recordings with several important jazz figures; Mercer Ellington, Mary Lou Williams, Coleman Hawkins, Stuff Smith and Meryl Booker.
During that same period she formed her own group, The Mary Osborne Trio in which she also supplied the vocal interest. Her trio made a series of successful public performances and recordings that were originally released on 78 RPM records. She later gave up the trio format to perform on her own at clubs and on TV where she played on the Arthur Godfrey and Ted Steele shows.
In the 1950’s she recorded with Tyree Glenn and produced a long playing record under her own name, A Girl and Her Guitar.
In 1968 Mary Osborne moved to Bakersfield, California where she operated the Osborne Guitar Company and performed in local venues. In 1977 she made a recording with Marian McPartland entitled Now’s The Time with a lineup of some of the best women jazz musicians of the day. In 1982 Stash records released Now And Then which included new material and material from A Girl and Her Guitar.
Mary Osborne died in Bakersfield, California in 1992.

Source : http://classicjazzguitar.com/artists/artists_page.jsp?artist=21

Mary Osborne
A Girl and Her Guitar
(1959)

Tracks

1 I Love Paris (Porter)  2:45
2 I Let A Song Go out of My Heart (Ellington, Nemo, Mills, Redmond)  2:47
3 How High The Moon (Hamilton, Lewis)  2:50
4 When Your Lover Has Gone (Swan)  3:45
5 Mary's Goodbye Blues (Osborne)  4:35
6 I Found A New Baby (Palmer, Williams)  3:04
7 Sophisticated lady (Ellington, Parish, Mills)  4:14
8 I'm Beginning To See The Light (James, George, Ellington Hodges)  2:29
9 Body And Soul (Green, Heyman, Sour, Eyton)  2:50
10 I Surrender Dear (Barris, Clifford)  2:54
11 These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You) (Link, Strachey, Marvell)  3:08

*

Personnel
Mary Osborne - g
Daniel Barker - g
Tommy Flanagan - p
Tommy Potter - b
Jo Jones - dr

Recorded 1959



See also : http://www.vintageguitar.com/8559/mary-osborne/

Chuck Wayne & Joe Puma - Interactions

During the mid-to-late 1960's it was widely believed — at least among those of us who cared — that our country was about to lost perhaps its only native art form. Jazz Music, afflected with everything bad from terminal apathy to free floating hostility and neglect, was limping along towards imminent doom.
Many jazz players quit. Many others sensing disaster, herded themselves toward the elephant burial grounds of 'show biz' and television, choosing to end with a fate night giggle rather than a bang of whimper.
Looking back on that bleak period, although its depressing effects are still with us, a certain pattern og hope emerges. There were and are many signs of life. It seems now that Jazz Music, rather than having died, had merely gone underground for a while in order to survive — much like certain beautiful desert flowers which go through severe drought in a semi-dormant state, waiting for the next rain. 
Things eventually began to blossom a bit. In the stone canyons of Manhattan good solo piano players sprouted here and here ; cautious bass and guitar duets took root in the timid corners of restaurant — not much at first, but something.
Little by little it has become clear that many of the finest and best jazz players have survived and are still producing, perhaps a bit scarred by the ordeal, but also a bit older and wiser and less likely to let it all slip away again.
Two of the very finest of these seasoned veterans are presented on this album. The collective playing experience of Joe Puma and Chuck Wayne covers an awesome line-up of major jazz artists and singers (if the names of Charlie Parker, Artie Shaw, Tony Benett and Peggy Lee don't make you stop and think, then you've come to the strong record bin).
What the two of them do here together is a level where the men are rapidly separated from the boys.
Jim Hall, original and beautiful liner notes from the cover

Chuck Wayne
Joe Puma 
Interactions

Tracks

1 My Favorite Things (Rodgers, Hammerstein)  5:54
2 Fly Me to the Moon (Howard)  4:29
3 Let's Do It Again (Wayne)  4:22
4 Little Joes Waltz (Puma)  5:19
5 Body and Soul (Green, Heyman, Sour, Eyton)  7:01
6 Lester Leaps In (Young)  4:44
7 Here's That Rainy Day (VanHeusen, Burke)  5:43
8 Baubles, Bangles and Beads (Forrest, Wright)  4:37
9 Satin Doll (Ellington, Strayhorn, Mercer)  4:49
10 There'll Never Be Another You (Gordon, Warren)  5:14
11 I'll Get Along (Wayne)  7:16

*


Joe Puma & Chuck Wayne - g

Recorded at MacDonald Studio ; November 1973

See also :
http://www.jazzdiscography.com/Leaders/PumaJoe-ldr.php

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Mel Lewis Septet

Although he was generally reluctant to solo, Mel Lewis was considered one of the definitive big band drummers, a musician who was best at driving an orchestra, but could also play quite well with smaller units. He started playing professionally when he was 15 and worked with the big bands of Boyd Raeburn (1948), Alvino Rey, Ray Anthony, and Tex Beneke. Lewis gained a great deal of recognition in the jazz world for his work with Stan Kenton (1954-1957), making the large ensemble swing hard. In 1957, he settled in Los Angeles, became a studio drummer, and worked with the big bands of Terry Gibbs and Gerald Wilson. Lewis went to New York to play with Gerry Mulligan's Concert Jazz Band in 1960, and he toured Europe with Dizzy Gillespie (1961) and the Soviet Union with Benny Goodman (1962). In 1965, Lewis formed an orchestra in New York with Thad Jones which grew to be one of the top big bands in jazz. When Jones surprised everyone by suddenly fleeing to Europe in 1979, Lewis became the orchestra's sole leader, playing regularly each Monday night at the Village Vanguard until his death. Lewis recorded as a leader in the 1950s for San Francisco Jazz Records, Mode (reissued on V.S.O.P.), and Andex and, after Thad Jones left their orchestra, Lewis recorded with his big band for Atlantic, Telarc, and Music Masters.
Scott Yanow -All Music Guide

Source : http://www.freshsoundrecords.com/got__cha-cd-2963.html

Mel Lewis Septet
Got' Cha

Tracks

1 In a Mellowtone (Ellington)  8:10
2 Leave Your Worries Behind (Niehaus)  4:14
3 A Winters Tale (Adams)  8:36
4 Sir Richard Face (Perkins)  5:00
5 One for Pat (Niehaus)  3:58
6 'Enry 'Iggins 'Ead (Coker)  8:26
7 El Cerrito (Marabuto)  6:08

*

Personnel
Ed Leddy - tp
Richie Kamuca - as
Jerry Coker - as
Pepper Adams - bs
Johnny Marabuto - p
Dean Reilly - b
Mel Lewis - dr

Recorded in San Francisco ; November 19, [# 1, 2 & 5] ; & 20, [# 3, 4, 6 & 7] 1956.

Joe Puma - Shining Hour

Cool-toned guitarist Joe Puma is best known for his playing in the 1950s. This 1997 CD reissue has a live Puma trio date from 1984, which was his first occasion to lead his own recording session since 1961. The music is quite enjoyable, featuring Puma with pianist Hod O'Brien and bassist Red Mitchell. The guitarist was still very much in prime form, playing in a style unchanged from decades earlier. His interplay with O'Brien and Mitchell uplifts the standards, which include "Remember," "For All We Know" and "Mood Indigo," and he introduces two appealing originals. Highly recommended.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/shining-hour-r313123

Joe Puma
Shining Hour

Tracks

1 My Shining Hour (Arlen, Mercer)  6:03
2 Lovely (Sondheim)  5:14
3 Mood Indigo (Bigard, Ellington, Mills)  3:45
4 Remember (Berlin)  4:13
5 For All We Know (Coots, Lewis)  5:25
6 Love Nest (Harbach, Hirsch)  6:29
7 Little Joe's Waltz (Puma)  6:55

*

Personnel 
Joe Puma - g
Hod O'Brien - p
Red Mitchell - b

Recorded on location at Orpheus Music ; June 1, 1984

Buddy Collette at the Cinema

This set is a veritable west coast flutist convention. A pastoral picnic with the Swinging Shepherds, led by Buddy Collette’s frolicsome flute and built on a beat definitely not bucolic. Buddy, along with Bud Shank, Paul Horn, and Harry Klee, introduced a new concept : warm, woodsy sounds from four flutes and rhythm. Before this experience, flute in jazz had generally been utilized in solo context. The arrival of the Swinging Shepherds, with their unique arrangements for a quartet of flutes, blowing freely and off-the-chart modern jazz as the mood dictated, proved it’s not the instrument, after all, that determines eligibility; it’s the player. The interplay between them as they switch to the various instruments in the flute family is remarkable. The first album was further enlivened by the presence of the Nelson Riddle rhythm section, with Bill Miller on piano, Joe Comfort on bass, and Bill Richmond on drums. On the second, Miller shares the piano spot with John T. Williams, Shelly Manne and Earl Palmer alternate on drums, Red Mitchell is the bassist, and Jim Hall is added on guitar. Overall, Collette’s Swinging Shepherds produced some beautiful sounds, as would be expected of such a gifted group of jazz musicians.

Source : http://www.freshsoundrecords.com/buddy_collettes_swinging_shepherds_2_lps_on_1_cd-cd-5451.html

Buddy Collette
and his
Swinging Shepherds

Tracks

1 The Funky Shepherds (Shank)  4:51
2 Tasty Dish (Collette)  4:19
3 Improvisation (unaccompanied) (Rugolo, Shank, Collette, Horn, Klee)  2:10
4 The Four Winds Blow (Horn)  3:35
5 Pony Tale (Horn)  4:28
6 Machito (Collette)  3:51
7 Short Story (Collette)  3:21
8 Flute Diet (Collette)  4:41
9 Improvisation (with conga) (Rugolo, Shank, Collette, Horn, Klee)  2:25
10 Colonel Bogey & River Kwai March (Adford)  3:29
11 Laura (Raskin, Mercer)  2:38
12 Smile (Chaplin)  3:06
13 The Bad and the Beautiful (Raksin)  4:10
14 The Shrike (Rugolo)  3:24
15 I Can't Believe That You're In Love With Me (McHugh, Gaskill)  2:42
16 The Trolley Song (Blane, Martin)  1:54
17 Intermezzo (Henning, Provost)  3:27
18 Ruby (Roemheld, Parish)  3:21
19 Invitation (Kaper, Webster)  3:52
20 Swinging on a Star (Burke, VanHeusen)  2:56


*

Personnel
[# 1-9] "Buddy Collette and His Swinging Shepherds" (Mercury SR 80005)
Buddy Collette, Bud Shank, Paul Horn - fl, a-fl & piccolo
Harry Klee - fl, a-fl & b-fl
Bill Miller - p
Joe Comfort - b
Bill Richmond - dr & cng [on # 9]
Recorded at Master Recorders, Hollywood, March 5 [# 5, 7-9] & 7, 1958.
[# 10-20] "Buddy Collette and His Swinging Shepherds at the Cinema" (Mercury SR 60132)
Buddy Collette, Bud Shank, Paul Horn - fl, a-fl & piccolo
Harry Klee - fl, a-fl & b-fl
Bill Miller or John T. Williams [# 14-19] - p
Jim Hall - g
Red Mitchell - b
Shelly Manne or Earl Palmer [# 10, 16, 18 & 19] - dr
Recorded at Master Recorders, Hollywood, January 10 [# 10-13], January 17 [# 14-16], February 21 [# 17-20], 1959.

See also
http://microgroove.jp/mercury/MG36133.shtml

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Fred Katz - Folk Songs for Far Out Folk

Cellist Fred Katz is best remembered as a sideman with the Chico Hamilton Quintet, Paul Horn, and Pete Rugolo, though on this famous, long unavailable record of his own, he serves as conductor and arranger rather than player. Folk Songs for Far Out Folk consists of his tantalizing, imaginative adaptations of African, Hebrew, and American folk tunes. The musical cast varies with each group of selections. The three African songs, highlighted by the explosive "Mate'ka," include trumpeters Pete Candoli, Don Fagerquist, and Irving Goodman, with a six-man percussion section that features Larry Bunker and Nat King Cole sideman Jack Costanzo. Four American songs include treatment of "Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child" that alternates between brooding and upbeat cool, with vibraphonist Gene Estes, pianist Johnny Williams, and guitarist Billy Bean lending a hand. The two Hebrew songs focus on reeds exclusively (excepting Mel Pollen's bass). The playful setting of "Ray's Nigun" showcases Justin Gordon on bass clarinet with Paul Horn and Buddy Collette providing whimsical accompaniment on flutes. This CD reissue by Reboot Stereophonic expands considerably on the original Warner Bros. LP, adding updated liner notes and photos of Katz in addition to reproducing the original notes and poetry that were part of the original package. Highly recommended.
Ken Dryden

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:hvftxq85ldke

Fred Katz
Folk Songs for Far Out Folk
(Orchestras conducted by Fred Katz)

Tracks

1 Mate'ka  6:35
2 Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child  4:12
3 Been in the Pen So Long  3:09
4 Chili'lo [Lament]  3:56
5 Rav's Nigun  3:00
6 Old Paint  4:55
7 Manthi-Ki  5:09
8 Baal Shem Tov  4:01
9 Foggy, Foggy Dew  5:21

All Songs are "Ad Lib Music Publishing"
Adapted by Fred Katz


*

Personnel
Feat. Gene Estes, Billy Bean, Pete Candoli, Johnny T. WiIliams, Mel Pollan, Jerry Williams, Justin Gordon, Paul Horn, Buddy Collette, Jules Jacob, George Smith, Don Fagerquist, Larry Bunker, Bob Enevoldsen, Harry Betts, Lou Singer, etc...

Recorded in Hollywood, California ; between July 21 & September 17, 1958