Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Gypsy Jazz (1934-1956)

This wonderful 4CD collection of Gypsy jazz—an Aladdin's Cave of rarities, curiosities and lesser known virtuosi of the genre—covers the first twenty or so years of the music's history. Disc one starts in 1934, with future Quintette Du Hot Club De France stars guitarist Django Reinhardt and violinist Stephane Grappelli's first recording session together, and disc four ends in 1956, with two gems featuring electric guitarist Sacha Distel, before his later career as a pop singer and matinee idol. Most of the tracks were recorded in Paris, with a handful made elsewhere in Europe or further afield. The four discs, comprehensively annotated in the accompanying booklet, are arranged chronologically. For most people, Gypsy jazz begins and ends with Reinhardt, indubitably the style's most gifted guitarist. The chief delight of Gypsy Jazz, however, is that it casts its net far wider than Reinhardt's recordings, revealing a host of other astonishing and singular musicians. Ten of the twenty-five tracks on disc one, which spans the pre-war years 1934-39, include Reinhardt, in Hot Club and other settings, but he is heard on only another eight tracks over the remaining three discs. Disc one's opener, "Le Jour Ou Je Te Vis," a resounding contradiction, incidentally, of the dictum "never start with a ballad," finds Reinhardt a featured soloist in the band led by crooner Jean Sablon, who was seeking to emulate Bing Crosby's early recordings with guitarist Eddie Lang. Reinhardt's limpid, pensive solo is as lovely as anything he recorded later. The disc's other Reinhardt tracks, most of them made with the Hot Club, are also to be treasured, but are already widely available. Less well known, though equally remarkable, are seven tracks featuring the guitar-playing brothers Sarane, Baro and Matelo Ferret. Members of a Paris-based Gitan clan with its roots in Spain, the Ferrets brought a darker, starker character to Gypsy jazz than that favoured by Reinhardt and the Hot Club (though they could rug-cut with the best of them when required). The darkness was no affectation—by the 1940s, Baro, for one, had drifted away from music to become a full-time gangster. "Winds And Strings," made with accordionist Gus Viseur's group in 1938, is a masterpiece of brooding intensity to rival anything recorded by trumpeter Miles Davis. Discs two and three span the war years, 1939-45. The Ferrets are frequently featured, mostly in Sarane's Swing Quintette De Paris. By 1942, seeking to avoid the attention of Paris' occupying nazis, the band had dropped the prefix Swing. As Gypsies, the Ferrets were already at risk of arrest and "deportation," and so it took considerable courage for them further to endanger themselves by featuring the Jewish violinist, Georges Effosse, on eight tracks recorded in 1942. A classically trained virtuoso on a par with Grappelli, Effosse's melancholic air sat perfectly in the group. This gentle-looking and supremely lyrical musician perished in the Dora concentration camp in 1944. His compelling, weeping playing on "Royal Blue" inspires one of Sarane Ferret's most affecting solos. Disc four, which takes us up to 1956, contains other lost masterpieces. Django Reinhardt's guitarist brother, Joseph, plays perhaps his finest ever solo on "L'Oeil Noir." Electric guitarist Jean Bonal, more in Charlie Christian's tradition than the Reinhardts', offers two shimmering recalibrations of Django's signature originals "Melodie Du Crepuscule" and "Nuages," recorded in 1954. The twin electric guitars of Sacha Distel and Jean-Pierre Sasson may actually be more swing-to-bop than Gypsy jazz, but "Two Guitar Blues" and "Joan," from 1956, are each delightful. Four of the greatest tracks on the final disc—and perhaps on the entire set—were recorded in Buenos Aires, 1944-47 by the guitarist Oscar Aleman. Argentine-born, but resident in Paris since 1931, where for several years he was a member of singer/dancer Josephine Baker's band, the Baker Boys, Aleman escaped from France to Argentina, via Spain, in 1941. With a quintet co-featuring violinist Manuel Gavinovich and guitarist Guillermo Barbieri, Aleman brings a dramatic, heavily tango-influenced atmosphere to "Caminos Cruzados" (Cross Roads) and a surreal, cod-Arabic one to "Diga Diga Doo." And all this is barely to scratch the surface of the munificent Gypsy Jazz, whose four hours and forty minutes' playing time is unfailingly entertaining and frequently surprising, with a heap of other near-forgotten but distinctive musicians to be savoured. Highly recommended.
Chris May

http://www.allmusic.com/album/gypsy-jazz-r1172162

Gypsy Jazz
Sarane Ferret, Henri Crolla, Oscar Aleman,
Django Reinhardt & Others
(1934-1956)
Complete box, 4 cds.

Tracks

Cd.1

Crazy Strings

1 Le Jour où je te vis (Johnston, Coslow)  3:08
2 Cloud Castles (Van Hoorebeke)  3:10
3 Crazy Strings (Van Hoorebeke)  3:22
4 You Took Advantage of Me (Rodgers, Hart)  2:53
5 Bricktop (Reinhardt, Grappelli3:01
6 Speevy (Reinhardt, Grappelli2:50
7 Paramount Stomp (Reinhardt, Grappelli)  2:34
8 Boléro (Reinhardt, Grappelli)  4:00
9 Mabel (Reinhardt)  4:04
10 Christmas Swing (Reinhardt)  2:47
11 Sweet Georgia Brown (Pinkard, Bernie, Casey)  3:13
12 Winds and Strings (Viseur, Ferret)  3:11
13 Automne (Viseur)  2:17
14 Daphné (Reinhardt, Grappelli)  2:52
15 Andalousie (Viseur, Ferret)  2:38
16 Nobody's Sweetheart (Kahn, Erdman, Meyers, Schoebel)  2:18
17 Whispering (Schonberger, Coburn, Rose)  2:44
18 Ma Theo (Matheo)  3:01
19 Gin, Gin (Reinhardt)  3:05
20 La Valse des Niglots (Malha)  3:09
21 Ti-Pi-Tin (Grever, Leveen)  2:39
22 Russian Lullaby (Berlin)  2:59
23 Just a Little Swing (Aleman, Racon)  2:23
24 Dear Old Southland (Creamer, Layton)  2:58
25 Jeepers Creepers (Warren, Mercer)  2:30

*

Cd. 2

Gitan Swing

1 Hallelujah (Robin, Grey, Youmans)  2:16
2 Jumping For Joy (Wilson, Sampson)  2:34
3 I Found a New Baby (Plamer, Williams)  2:33
4 Undecided (Shavers, Robin)  2:50
5 Rosetta (Hines, Woods)  2:34
6 Coucou (Mathas, Feline)  2:39
7 Opus 5 (Shavers)  3:00
8 Swing de Paris (Reinhardt)  2:47
9 Oiseaux des Îles (Reinhardt)  2:35
10 Nostalgia Gitana (Murena, Perugi)  2:29
11 Miami (Ferret)  2:36
12 Septembre (Ferret)  2:48
13 Blue Guitare (Ferret)  2:30
14 Swing Star (Ferret)  2:50
15 Swing 39 (Reinhardt, Grappelli)  2:52
16 Cocktail Swing (Ferret)  2:43
17 Deux Guitares (Ferret)  2:22
18 Tiger Rag (LaRocca, DaCosta, Shields, Edwards, Regas, Sbarbaro)  2:18
19 Gitan Swing (Murena, Ferret)  2:44
20 Rose de Miel (Waller)  2:25
21 Royal Blue (Ferret)  3:08
22 Surprise Party (Ferret)  3:00
23 Daphné (Reinhardt)  2:35
24 Hungaria (Reinhardt)  2:52

*

Cd. 3

Blue Dreams

1 Zazou Zazou (Loyraux)  2:49
2 Ballade (Viseur)  2:42
3 Blues en Mineur (Reinhardt)  2:46
4 Swing 42 (Reinhardt)  2:40
5 Sur la glace (Deloof)  3:16
6 Chantons ensemble (Omer)  3:36
7 Harlem Swing (Deloof, Powell)  3:32
8 Gus et Gus (Dellof)  2:37
9 Rêves Bleus (Viseur ?)  3:11
10 Manche de fouet (Viseur)  2:26
11 Ding, Dong Dang (Thunes)  2:26
12 Skumring (Ottersen)  2:56
13 Promenade (Normann)  2:23
14 Opus 1 (Normann)  2:51
15 Lucky (Ferret)  2:35
16 Folies Bergère (Ferret)  3:05
17 Studio 28 (Ferret)  2:47
18 Sex-Appeal (Ferret)  3:03
19 Improvisation n° 3 Pt. 1 (Reinhardt)  3:00
20 Improvisation n° 3 Pt. 2 (Reinhardt)  2:45
21 Exactly Like You (Fields, McHugh)  2:21
22 Swing Guitar (Reinhardt, Grappelli)  2:44
23 La Vipère du trottoir (Scotto, Rodor)  2:26
24 Un peu de rêve (Reinhardt)  2:59
25 Douce Georgette (Sweet Georgia Brown) (Bernie, Pinkard, Casey)  2:33

*

Cd. 4

Minor Swing

1 L'Oeil Noir (Reinhardt)  2:25
2 Caminos Cruzados (Lecuona)  2:25
3 Darktown Strutters Ball (Brooks)  2:49
4. Cielos Azules (Berlin)  2:32
5 Diga Diga Doo (McHugh, Fields)  2:51
6 Ideas In Minor (Christiani)  3:22
7 How High The Moon ? (Hamilton, Lewis)  3:38
8. Minor Swing (Reinhardt)  2:23
9 Mélodie au Crépuscule (Reinhardt)  2:54
10. Nuages (Reinhardt)  3:27
11 Flighty Flies (Christiani, Poptie)  3:21
12. Snowy Blues (Poptie)  3:13
13 Artillerie Lourde (Reinhardt)  4:23
14 I Surrender Dear (Barris, Clifford)  2:55
15 Out Of Nowhere (Green, Heyman)  2:56
16 Djoungalo (Ferret)  2:09
17 Pennies From Heaven (Johnston, Burke)  2:03
18 Love For Sale (Porter)  3:55
19 Yardbird Suite (Parker)  3:41
20 Je cherche après Titine (Daniderff, Bertal, Maubon, Ronn)  1:51
21 Ay, Ay, Ay (Freire)  2:00
22 Two Guitar Blues (Sasson)  3:04
23 Joan (Sasson2:30
24 Just Blowing (Poptie)  3:08 

*

Recorded between January 1934 & June 1956

See the complete artwork for all details (dates, places, musicians, etc.)

________
Proper Records presents a four-CD, 97-track anthology devoted to music recorded during the golden years of Gypsy jazz, from swing to bop to a bit of the cool (1934-1956). Happily, this tradition is still very much alive, and the recordings compiled herein demonstrate why even Joseph Goebbels, Adolf Eichmann, and Heinrich Himmler couldn't stamp it out. In addition to classic sides by famous or relatively well-known artists like guitarist Django Reinhardt, violinists Stéphane Grappelli, Michel Warlop, and Svend Asmussen and crooner Jean Sablon, this fascinating collection traces the intricacies of the Gypsy jazz movement throughout mainland Europe with rare recordings by members of the Reinhardt and Ferret families as well as accordionists Gus Viseur and Tony Murena, saxophonist Albert Ferreri, reedman and violinist Frans Poptie, and a veritable swarm of guitarists including Oscar Aleman, Jean Bonal, Eddy Christiani, Jean-Pierre Sasson, and Henri Crolla. Given this set's wealth of variegated material and its remarkably affordable price tag, Proper may well have come up with the world's best all-purpose, authentic Gypsy jazz collection. It more or less picks up where the Frémeaux & Associes 2005 release Django Reinhardt Complete, Vol. 20 : Pour Que Ma Vie left off.
arwulf arwulf 

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:fbfyxzqgldhe

Curtis Counce Exploring The Future

Bassist Curtis Counce was an in-demand player from the moment he arrived in Los Angeles in the late 40s. His group included pianist Carl Perkins, trumpeter Jack Sheldon and the incredible saxophonist Harold Land. Signed by Contemporary, they released two fine hard bop albums in 1956 and 1957. By the time of their Dootone album Exploring The Future — which featured an astounding cover of Counce in an orange spacesuit — Perkins had died and Sheldon had left the group. The record was exceptional, although different from their earlier material, the arrival of Elmo Hope on piano making for a busier sound.
Dean Rudland

Source : https://acerecords.co.uk/exploring-the-future-1

Curtis Counce
Quintet
Exploring The Future

Tracks

1 So Nice (Hope)  6:39
2 Angel Eyes (Brent, Dennis)  4:01
3 Into the Orbit (Hope)  4:45
4 Move (Williams)  2:32
5 Race for Space (Hope)  4:34
6 Someone to Watch over Me (Gershwin, Gershwin)  3:43
7 Exploring the Future (Williams)  6:16
8 The Countdown (Hope)  4:03
9 Foreplay (?)  6:44
10 Chasing the Bird (Parker)  6:33
11 Move [Unedited Version] (Williams)  4:19
12 Head Gear (aka The Countdown) [Unedited Version] (Hope)  5:36

*

Personnel
Curtis Counce - b
Harold Land - ts
Rolf Ericson - tp
Elmo Hope - p
Frank Butler - dr

Recorded in 1958

Al Caiola & Friends

When guitarist Al Caiola (1920) moved to New York after graduating he was quickly hired as a staff musician by CBS, where his skill and adaptability guaranteed him a heavy radio and TV schedule until he left in 1956 ; he was, in fact, one of the busiest, most successful and respected session men in New York City throughout the 1950s and 1960s. In 1955, at the peak of his success, he recorded Deep in a Dream and Serenade in Blue for Savoy Records, two albums which focused on a meticulous and reverent treatment of a collection of well-known standards and of his own originals. Technically impeccable, on these Caiola is backed by an excellent rhythm section, with pianist Hank Jones demonstrating his usual warmth and skill, aided by drummer Kenny Clarke and bassist Clyde Lombardi.
Another asset is the assured, tasteful, lyrical, big-toned trumpet and flugelhorn of swing-era veteran Bernie Privin and, on four tracks, the multi-faceted reedman Romeo Penque and the young English pianist Ronnie Ball. Caiola, who worked on many shows in the early days of TV, was so multi-faceted and versatile that, when rock ‘n’ roll became popular, he  adapted easily to the new genre, and for years was much in demand as a session guitarist. At all times he remained the consummate professional.

Source : http://www.freshsoundrecords.com/al-caiola/6395-deep-in-a-dream-serenade-in-blue-2-lps-on-1-cd.html

Al Caiola
Deep in a Dream
Serenade in Blue
[Savoy Recordings]

Tracks

1 Deep in a Dream (Van Heusen, DeLange)  4:32
2 You Are Too Beautiful (Rodgers, Hart)  2:20
3 There Will Never Be Another You (Warren, Gordon)  3:47
4 Love Letters (Young, Heyman)  4:12
5 I’ve Got a Crush on You (Gershwin, Gershwin)  3:54
6 Thunderbird (Caiola)  4:56
7 I Got It Bad (and that Ain’t Good) (Ellington)  4:28
8 Everything Happens to Me (Dennis, Adair)  4:32
9 Don’t Worry ‘Bout Me (Bloom, Koehler)  4:48
10 Moments Like This (Lane, Loesser)  5:03
11 Indian Summer (Herbert, Dubin)  5:00
12 Drambuie (Caiola)  2:55
13 Serenade in Blue (Warren, Gordon)  4:35
14 Early Autumn (Burns, Herman, Mercer)  4:12
15 Black and Blue (Waller, Brooks)  3:40
16 Blue the Night (Caiola)  4:20


*

Personnel
[# 1-8] from the Savoy album “Deep in a Dream” (MG12033)
Al Caiola - g
Bernie Privin - tp & flghrn
Hank Jones - p
Clyde Lombardi - b
Kenny Clarke - dr
Recorded at Van Gelder’s Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey ; October 6, [# 1-4] ; & October 8, [# 5-8] 1955
[# 9-16] from the Savoy album “Serenade in Blue” (MG12057)
 * [# 9-12]
Al Caiola - g
Romeo Penque - fl, b cl & english hrn
Hank Jones - p
Clyde Lombardi - b
Kenny Clarke - dr
 * [# 13-16]
Al Caiola - g
Bernie Privin - tp & flghrn
Ronnie Ball - p
Clyde Lombardi - b
Kenny Clarke - dr
Recorded same place as above ; December 14, 1955 [# 9-12] ; & December 27, 1955 [#13-16]

Bud Shank - Slippery When Wet

Until 1958 jazz scores in movies had been mostly confined to setting the moody backdrop for crime and delinquency. But that summer photographer-producer Bruce Brown shot a film about surfboarders cavorting in Hawaii and decided he wanted a jazz score to capture the outdoor, summery mood, full of movement and action.
He chose the Bud Shank Quartet to create the musical backdrop to the surfboarders and the waves, with Shank, alternating on alto sax and flute, fluidly confident and purposeful, mostly backed by the excellent pairing of the gifted Peacock and Flores, with Billy Bean’s guitar in support.
The music that resulted produced a fine, swinging selection of modern jazz that perfectly caught the feel of the subject.
From the booklet

Source : http://www.freshsoundrecords.com/slippery_when_wet_-_original_soundtrack-cd-5446.html

Bud Shank
Slippery When Wet
Original Soundtrack

Tracks

1 Blues in the Surf [bonus track]  5:01
2 Mook’s Theme  4:32
3 Surf Pipers  3:32
4 The Surf and I  3:06
5 Up in Velseyland  3:23
6 Surf for Two  3:39
7 Slippery When Wet  2:36
8 Going My Wave  3:10
9 Old King Nep’s Tune  3:43
10 Walkin’ on the Water  4:42
11 Soupsville  3:34
12 Blues in the Distance [bonus track]  4:30

All tracks composed by Bud Shank

*

Personnel
Bud Shank - as & fl
Billy Bean - g
Gary Peacock - b
Chuck Flores - dr

Recorded at World Pacific Studios, Hollywood, California ; April 18, 1959

[# 2-11] from the World Pacific album "Slippery When Wet" (ST-1265).
[# 1 & 12] are bonus tracks from the same session that were not in the original soundtrack :
'Blues in the Surf' [# 1] Taken from the Crown album "Bud Shank" (Crown CST-311).
'Blues in the Distance' [# 12] Taken from the World Pacific LP "The Blues Vol 3: Blowin' The Blues" (JWC-512 Stereo)

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Miles Davis - The Original Mono Recordings (1955-1963)

Over the course of these nine albums, whose principal recording spanned barely a half decade (from June 1956 to March 1961), The Original Mono Recordings presents a clear vision of Miles’ evolution as musician and bandleader, and as a composer graduating from hardbop to modal creations. He was famously signed to Columbia Records by George Avakian in the summer of 1955, after the A&R staff producer witnessed Miles’ showstopping solo on a jam session of “’Round Midnight” at the Newport Jazz Festival. Jazz critics acclaimed the performance as the “return of Miles,” who was considered a difficult artist to work with, who did not even have a regular working group at the time.
Taking Avakian seriously, Miles assembled a group around bassist Paul Chambers and drummer “Philly” Joe Jones, with Red Garland on piano and, after several early contenders (Sonny Rollins, Hank Mobley), Philadelphian John Coltrane on tenor saxophone. This lineup cut four LPs’ worth of material in late ’55 and ’56 to satisfy Miles’ contractual obligations to Prestige Records. They also began to record the first Columbia LP, ’Round About Midnight, named for the paraphrased Monk title tune. The LP, produced by Avakian, consisted of jazz and popular standards done in Miles’ inimitable style.
Most significantly, in terms of The Original Mono Recordings, Myers writes, “the word ‘mono’ did not appear on the cover. Instead, the jacket announced that the music inside was ‘360º Sound, Guaranteed High Fidelity.’ Stereo technology wouldn’t be in place at Columbia until 1958, so there was no need to add the word ‘mono’ to delineate a difference. ‘Mono has always been truer to the studio sound and the original intent,’ said Avakian. ‘Mono featured less audio trickery and fewer audio distractions, so you can actually hear the musical conversation between Miles and the other musicians as it occurred in the studio.’”
For the second album, Avakian realized his intention to feature Miles in the presence of a jazz orchestra : horns, trumpets, trombones, bass trombone, tuba, alto sax, bass clarinet, flutes, and clarinets, along with bassist Chambers and drummer Art Taylor. Most significantly, Miles Ahead by Miles Davis + 19 reunited Miles with his late-1940s Birth of the Cool collaborator, arranger Gil Evans. With the exception of the title track, composed by Miles and Evans, the program again consisted of jazz and popular standards done Miles’ way.
Although the third album, Milestones, was recorded in two productive days of sessions in February and March 1958, it proved to be Avakian’s final LP with Miles. It reintroduced the quintet (Coltrane, Garland, Chambers, Jones) along with a new member from Florida, former schoolteacher Julian “Cannonball” Adderley on alto sax. Some of Miles’ most iconic music is heard on Milestones : the quintet (sextet’s) versions of Jackie McLean’s “Dr. Jekyll,” Dizzy Gillespie’s “Two Bass Hit,” and Monk’s closing “Straight, No Chaser.” At the same time, the album upped the ante of Miles’ originals with two, “Miles” and the 13-minute “Sid’s Ahead,” which hinted at things to come from the inspired young (32-year old) artist.
Two months after the Milestones sessions, the quintet (sextet) was back in the studio for a day of recording with a new Columbia staff producer, Cal Lampley. The session yielded four classics, three of which, due to length, made Side B of Jazz Track : Miles’ original “Fran-Dance,” and two American Songbook standards, “On Green Dolphin Street” and “Stella by Starlight.” (The fourth, “Love for Sale,” running over 11 minutes, is included on Columbia/Legacy’s Kind Of Blue 50th Anniversary sets.) The year before (December 1957), Miles had temporarily disbanded his group and gone to Paris to perform. There he was hired to create a soundtrack for French film director Louis Malle’s suspenseful murder mystery Ascenseur pour l’échafaud (Elevator To the Gallows in the U.S.). Miles and several European jazz musicians improvised the music while seeing the film on a screen. The music, barely 25 minutes, was issued on LP in France in 1958, and was subsequently coupled with the three Lampley tracks on Columbia as the cleverly titled Jazz Track, one of Miles’ most elusive and collectible LPs.
In between, Miles got back together with Gil Evans in July and August 1958, for the jazz orchestral masterpiece, the Gershwins’ Porgy And Bess, the final LP with Lampley. The scene was then set for the March-April 1959 Kind Of Blue sessions, with Columbia's Irving Townsend historically attributed as having overseen the recording, with a slightly revamped quintet (sextet) lineup, as Jones was replaced by Jimmy Cobb on drums, and Garland was replaced on piano by Bill Evans (on “So What,” “Blue In Green,” “All Blues,” and “Flamenco Sketches”) and by Wynton Kelly (“Freddie Freeloader”). The impact of Kind Of Blue, not only on jazz but on popular (even classical) music in general, continues to reverberate. It is part of the Library Of Congress National Recording Registry, it is #12 on the Rolling Stone list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time, and it was even honored by the U.S. House of Representatives in 2009, the album’s 50th anniversary.
Kind Of Blue’s closing track, “Flamenco Sketches,” might have hinted at the next project, the jazz orchestral Latin-tinged modal masterwork, Sketches Of Spain, the third of Miles’ collaborations with Gil Evans. Under Columbia’s staff producer Teo Macero (who would remain Miles’ exclusive producer at Columbia through the 1980s), two standards of the Spanish national repertoire, Rodrigo’s “Concierto de Aranjuez” and de Falla’s Will o’ the Wisp (from “El amor brujo”) were juxtaposed with three Evans originals, “The Pan Piper,” “Saeta” and “Solea.” Myers characterizes the conceptual framework as, “Davis’ piercing, crying solos supported by Evans’ sighing, sophisticated orchestrations that both provoked and mirrored Davis’ lines.”
The quintet lineup was again fine tuned in 1961 for Someday My Prince Will Come, Coltrane’s final Columbia recording with Miles (on the opening title track, from Disney’s Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs, and a Miles original, “Teo”). Tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley actually doubles with Trane on the title track, but has the tenor chair to himself on the other tracks, Miles originals (“Pfrancing,” “Drad-Dog”), and American Songbook staples “Old Folks” and Johnny Mercer’s closing “I Thought About You.”
Though separated in time by five summers, the Newport Jazz Festival performances by Miles’ sextet in 1958 (Adderley, Coltrane, Evans, Chambers, Cobb), and Thelonious Monk’s quartet in 1963, as heard on Miles And Monk At Newport, are remarkably seamless. As Mark Wilder told Myers, “I originally assumed that this album was going to need the most work to capture the original mono sound. After all, the Davis cuts were recorded in 1958, Monk’s in 1963, and both were recorded outdoors. Surprisingly, though, the master tapes were exactly like the original LP pressing and needed no fine-tuning.”

Source : http://www.milesdavis.com/us/news/miles-davis-original-mono-recordings-presents-nine-remastered-original-albums

Miles Davis
The Original Mono
Recordings
(1955-1963)

Tracks

Cd. 1

'Round About Midnight

1 'Round Midnight (Monk, Williams)  5:55
2 Ah-Leu-Cha (Parker)  5:53
3 All of You (Porter)  7:02
4 Bye Bye Blackbird (Dixon, Henderson)  7:57
5 Tadd's Delight (Dameron)  4:28
6 Dear Old Stockholm (Getz)  7:54

*


Cd. 2

Miles Ahead

1 Springsville (Carisi)  3:24
2 The Maids of Cadiz (Delibes)  4:01
3 The Duke (Brubeck)  3:33
4 My Ship (Weill, Gershwin)  4:20
(from the Broadway Musical, Lady in the Dark)
5 Miles Ahead (Davis, Evans)  3:32
6 Blues for Pablo (Evans)  5:15
7 New Rhumba (Jamal)  4:44
8 The Meaning of the Blues (Troup, Worth)  2:40
9 Lament (Johnson)  2:23
10 I Don't Wanna Be Kissed (By Anybone but You) (Spina, Elliott)  3:04

*

Cd. 3

Milestones

1 Dr. Jekyll (McLean)  5:50
2 Sid's Ahead (Davis)  13:07
3 Two Bass Hit (Gillespie, Lewis)  5:15
4 Milestones (Davis)  5:44
5 Billy Boy (trad.)  7:15
6 Straight, No Chaser (Monk)  10:42

*


Cd. 4

Jazz Track
[Ascenceur pour l'échafaud]

1 Générique  2:45
2 L'Assassinat de Carala  2:07
3 Sur l'autoroute  2:15
4 Julien dans l'ascenseur  2:06
5 Florence sur les Champs-Elysées  2:48
6 Diner au motel  3:54
7 Evasion de Julien  0:49
8 Visite du vigile  2:02
9 Au bar du Petit-Bac  2:51
10 Chez le photographe du motel  3:51

All Compositions by M. Davis

11 On Green Dolphin Street (Kaper, Washington)  9:50
12 Fran-Dance (Davis)  5:50
13 Stella by Starlight (Young, Washington)  4:44

*

Cd. 5

Porgy and Bess

1 The Buzzard Song  4:04
2 Bess You Is My Woman  5:10
3 Gone  3:37
4 Gone, Gone, Gone  2:01
5 Summertime  3:17
6 Bess, Oh Where's My Bess  4:20
7 Prayer (Oh, Doctor Jesus)  4:10
8 Fishermen, Strawberry and Devil Crab  4:00
9 My Man's Gone Now  5:30
10 It Ain't Necessarily So  2:15
11 Here Come de Honey Man  1:17
12 I Loves You, Porgy  4:04
13 There's a Boat That's Leaving Soon for New York  3:24

All Compositions by G. & I. Gershwin, & D. Heyward

*


Cd. 6

Kind of Blue

1 So What  9:33
2 Freddie Freeloader  10:02
3 Blue in Green  5:41
4 All Blues  12:07
5 Flamenco Sketches  9:50

All Composition by M. Davis 

*

Cd. 7

Sketches of Spain

1 Concierto de Aranjuez (Rodrigo)  16:19
2 Will o' the Wisp (Falla)  3:50
(from "El Amor brujo")
3 The Pan Piper (Evans)  3:53
4 Saeta (Evans)  5:08
5 Solea (Evans)  12:14

*


Cd. 8

Someday My Prince Will Come

1 Someday My Prince Will Come (Churchill, Morey)  9:06
(from the Walt Disney film, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs)
2 Old Folks (Hill, Robinson)  5:16
3 Pfrancing (Davis)  8:32
4 Drad-Dog (Davis)  4:30
5 Teo (Davis)  9:35
6 I Thought About You (Mercer, VanHeusen)  4:30

*

Cd. 9

Miles & Monk at Newport

The Miles Davis Sextet
1 Ah-Leu-Cha (Parker)  5:47
2 Straight, No Chaser (Monk)  8:46
3 Fran-Dance (Davis)  7:04
4 Two Bass Hit (Gillespie, Lewis)  4:13

The Thelonious Monk Quartet
5 Nutty (Monk)  13:55
6 Blue Monk (Monk)  11:15


*

Personnel 
Featuring John Coltrane, Ernie Royal, Charlie Rouse, Lee Konitz, John Carisi, Bernie Glow, Hank Mobley, Wynton Kelly, Butch Warren, Barney Wilen, Red Garland, Paul Chambers, René Urtreger, Frank Rehak, Gunther Schuller, Jimmy Cleveland, Philly Joe Jones, Pierre Michelot, Kenny Clarke, Jimmy Cobb, Danny Bank, Elvin Jones, Janet Putman, Bill Barber, Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, Frankie Dunlop, Pee Wee Russell, Bill Evans, Julian "Cannonball" Adderley, Johnny Coles...

Recorded between October 27, 1955 & August 4, 1963

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The Swingin’ Guitar Of Marcel Bianchi (1937-1953)

The present compilation is essentially based on recordings create [before the start and during the Second Wold War], before Marcel Bianchi decides to adopt almost in a definite way the electric guitar. In Switzerland he discovers something which modified his career : his first electric guitar, bought in Basel in 1944, an instrument made in Switzerland, inspired by the famous American Gibson guitars, such as those used by famous guitarist Charlie Christian, who Marcel knows and admires so much ! Thus, he becomes the real pioneer of the amplfied instrument : first of all in Switzerland in 1944, then in France since 1945.
The sides of this collection were mainly recorded between 1938 and 1946, including the "Swiss career" of our guitarist. Some of these recordings are of discographic origin ; some others come from radio performances, either with Bob Huber's orchestra, Jerry Thomas' ensemble, or pianist Fred Böhler orchestra. In 1944-1945, Marcel Bianchi performances regularly with these groups before coming back to Paris after the end of the War. In 1946, he records his last solos on acoustic guitar, as shows "Celesta", with pianist Lois Unia's group "Tomas and his Merry Boys" (nothing to do with the Swiss orchestra of Jerry Thomas drummer).
The guitar style of Marcel Bianchi, although very influenced by Django Reinhardt's, remains quite recognizable. Firstly, for his very percussive playing, sometimes almost excessive. Secondly, for playing the guitar of Carbonnel, a Marseilles stringed-instruments maker, in a very different tone of the now famous Selmer guitars played by Django.
Marcel was not indifferent to American guitarists, as shows this "Running Ragged" version of legendary duet Eddie Lang-Joe Venuti, who preceded in the jazz history the Reinhardt-Grappelli interpretation...
Patrick Saussois, (English version, Maryury Sauvêtre), from the booklet

Marcel Bianchi
The Swingin’ Guitar
of Marcel Bianchi
(Swing Sessions 1937-1953)

Tracks

1 Jam Men (Allier)  2:49
2 Peter’s Stomp (Allier)  3:03
3 Farewell Blues (Schoebel, Rappolo, Mares)  3:21
4 Caravan (Tizol, Ellington, Mills)  2:42
5 Seul ce Soir (Durand)  3:18
6 Bonsoir jolie Madame (Trenet)  3:34
7 Caravan (Tizol, Ellington, Mills)  2:44
8 Wabash Blues (Meinken, Ringle)  2:44
9 Flamenco n°1 (Bianchi)  2:41
10. Flamenco n°2 (Bianchi)  2:48
11 When Day is Done (Katscher)  2:38
12 My Blue Heaven (Whitting, Donaldson)  2:23
13 Smoke Rings (Gifford, Washington)  2:50
14 Out of Nowhere (Hayman, Green)  2:53
15 Running Ragged (Venuti)  2:56
16 Bianchi’s Music (Bianchi)  2:39
17 Bianchi Stomp (Bianchi)  1:48
18 Out of Nowhere (Hayman, Green)  2:18
19 Minor Swing (Reinhardt, Grappelli)  3:06
20 Delivery Shout (Huber)  1:53
21 Vocero (Trad.)  2:31
22 Deux mélodies Corses (Trad.)  2:38
23 Celesta (Unia)  2:44
24 Carioca (Youmans, Kahn, Eliscu) - The Continental (Conrad, Magidson)  3:51
25 Night and Day - Begin the Biguine (Porter) - A fine Romance (Kern, Fields)  4:57
26 Top Hat (Berlin) - I Wont Dance (Kern, Hammerstein, Harbach)  1:58

*

Personnel
Featuring Marcel Bianchi, Pierre Fouad, Alix Combelle, Tony Rovira, Jerry Thomas, Hubert Rostaing, Antoine Franchi, Jerry Mengo, Armand Molinetti, Pierre Spiers, Ray Stokes, etc...

Recorded between May 15th, 1938 & 1953 

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Charlie Christian - The Genius of the Electric Guitar (1939-1941)

Charlie Christian did not invent the electric guitar, nor was he the first to play it. But his horn-like, bluesy, sweet-and-tart conception made the jazz world take notice in the late 1930s and early 40s, and he gave the instrument its first truly distinctive voice. Along with another southwestern-based musician, tenor sax master Lester Young, Christian helped push swing over the border into bebop with a supple, relaxed approach to time, and a smooth, chromatic approach that spun flurries of diminished and augmented scale notes with melodic and rhythmic grace, all the while evincing a liberal - and powerful - use of silence and sonic space.
With The Genius of the Electric Guitar, Columbia-Legacy has given Christian the full box set treatment : four discs that collect every note that Charlie played for Columbia - including alternate takes, rehearsals, and false starts - mostly under the aegis of bandleader Benny Goodman. The box itself is cleverly made to look like one of Christian’s old Gibson amplifiers, and the accompanying booklet offers excellent historical perspective and thorough biographical and discographical information, along with intelligent track-by-track commentary and plenty of photos.
Since Christian died young of tuberculosis (most likely exacerbated by hard-living and serious partying), it’s easy to see the record label marketing machinery trying to create another Robert Johnson-tortured-genius mythology around the guitarist. But don’t fall for it : whatever the truth of his lifestyle, Christian’s music sings with joy and a vital sense of discovery.
New listeners expecting the ultimate jazz guitar rush might be disappointed at first: Christian’s solos on these mostly small-group sides are seldom more than a single chorus long. But those choruses are almost always masterful ; and they created the lexicon for nearly all jazz guitar that followed.
Beyond the value of this set as Chapter and Verse for jazz guitarists, there is the vivid record here of Benny Goodman’s near-invention of something that came to be called chamber jazz : a tightly arranged yet relaxed format that, with an almost classical balance and poise, allowed each member of the ensemble sufficient space for their distinctive voices to be heard. And what voices: Goodman, Count Basie, Lester Young, Cootie Williams, Lionel Hampton, and Johnny Guarnieri are just some of the masters heard from on these recordings.
The sound quality here is stunning ; it’s a tribute to the original Columbia session engineers and the re-master engineers that this music sounds as good as it does. The drums in particular are richer and more detailed than on any other recordings of this vintage that I’ve ever heard.
The biggest thrill of the entire set might well be the guitar-with-big band showpiece “Solo Flight” : chorus after chorus, Christian excites and surprises with seemingly endless inventiveness. It’s as fresh now as it was back in 1941, when it knocked quite a few guitar players on their asses and opened up new ways of thinking, hearing, and playing.
Kevin Macneil Brown

Source : http://www.dustedmagazine.com/reviews/411

Charlie Christian
The Genius of the Electric Guitar

Tracks

Cd. 1

1 Flying Home (Goodman, Hampton)  3:12
2 Rose Room (Hickman, Williams)  2:47
3 Stardust (Carmichael)  3:14
4 Memories Of You (Razaf, Blake)  3:10
5 Soft Winds (Henderson)  2:27
6 Seven Come Eleven (Goodman, Christian)  2:46
7 Shivers (Christian, Hampton)  2:48
8 AC/DC Current (Christian, Hampton, Goodman)  2:45
9 I'm Confessin' (That I Love You) (Neiburg, Dougherty, Reynolds)  2:58
10 Till Tom Special (Goodman, Hampton)  3:04
11 Gone With What Wind (Basie, Goddman)  3:22
12 The Sheik Of Araby [second take] (Smith, Wheeler, Snyder)  3:15
13 Untitled Tune (unknown)  2:01
14 Poor Butterfly (Golden, Hubbell)  2:51
15 I Surrender, Dear [second take] (Clifford, Barris)  3:00
16 Boy Meets Goy (Grand Slam) [second take] (Goodman)  2:53
17 These Foolish Things (Marvell, Strachey)  3:13
18 Flying Home (Goodman, Hampton)  3:16
19 Memories Of You (Razaf, Blake)  3:09
20 Soft Winds (Henderson)  2:28
21 Shivers (Christian, Hampton)  2:30
22 Gone With What Wind (Basie, Goddman)  3:15
23 The Sheik Of Araby [first take] (Smith, Wheeler, Snyder)  3:26
24 I Surrender, Dear [first take] (Clifford, Barris)  2:55
25 Boy Meets Goy (Grand Slam) [first take] (Goodman)  2:50
26 These Foolish Things (Marvell, Strachey)  3:05

*


Cd. 2

1 Six Appeal (My Daddy Rocks Me) [fourth take] (Goodman)  3:18
2 Good Enough To Keep (Air Mail Special) [first take] (Goodman, Mundy, Christian)  2:53
3 Ad Lib Blues (impro.)  3:20
4 Wholly Cats (Goodman)  3:15
5 Charlie's Dream (Basie, Young)  3:12
6 I Never Knew (Fiorito, Kahn)  2:58
7 Lester's Dream (Basie, Young)  3:16
8 Wholly Cats [fourth take] (Goodman)  3:03
9 Wholly Cats [fifth take] (Goodman)  2:59
10 Royal Garden Blues [third take] (Williams, Williams)  3:01
11 As Long As I Live [second take] (Koehler, Arlen)  3:136
12 Benny's Bugle [sixth take] (Goodman)  3:06
13 Gilly [third take] (Goodman)  2:36
14 Six Appeal (My Daddy Rocks Me) [first take] [fourth take] (Goodman)  3:13
15 Six Appeal (My Daddy Rocks Me) [second take] (Goodman)  3:18
16 Six Appeal (My Daddy Rocks Me) [third take] (Goodman)  2:52
17 Good Enough To Keep (Air Mail Special) [second take] (Goodman, Mundy, Christian)  2:47
18 Good Enough To Keep (Air Mail Special) [third take] (Goodman, Mundy, Christian)  2:56
19 Wholly Cats [first take] (Goodman)  2:58
20 Wholly Cats [second take] (Goodman)  3:05
21 Wholly Cats [third take] (Goodman)  3:03
22 Royal Garden Blues [first take] (Williams, Williams)  2:46
23 Royal Garden Blues [second take] (Williams, Williams)  3:02
24 As Long As I Live [first take] (Koehler, Arlen)  3:22
25 Gilly [first take] (Goodman)  2:35
26 Gilly [second take] (Goodman)  2:35


*


Cd. 3

1 Breakfast Feud [fifth take] (Goodman)  3:11
2 I Can't Give You Anything But Love [third take] (Fields, McHugh)  3:23
3 Breakfast Feud [fourth take] (Goodman)  3:03
4 On The Alamo (Kahn, Jones)  3:24
5 I Found A New Baby [second take] (Palmer, Williams)  3:02
6 Gone With What Draft [third take] (Goodman)  2:40
7 A Smo-o-o-oth One [third take] (Goodman)  3:17
8 Air Mail Special (Good Enough To Keep) [second take] (Goodman, Mundy, Christian)  3:22
9 Breakfast Feud [first take] (Goodman)  3:52
10 Breakfast Feud [second take] (Goodman)  3:18
11 Breakfast Feud [third take] (Goodman)  3:10
12 Breakfast Feud [fourth take] (Goodman)  3:14
13 I Can't Give You Anything But Love [first take] (Fields, McHugh)  3:23
14 I Can't Give You Anything But Love [second take] (Fields, McHugh)  3:35
15 Breakfast Feud [first take] (Goodman)  3:06
16 Breakfast Feud [second take] (Goodman)  3:13
17 Breakfast Feud [third take] (Goodman)  3:03
18 I Found A New Baby [first take] (Palmer, Williams)  2:55
19 Gone With What Draft [first take] (Goodman)  2:44
20 Gone With What Draft [second take] (Goodman)  2:43
21 A Smo-o-o-oth One [first take] (Goodman)  3:17
22 A Smo-o-o-oth One [second take] (Goodman)  3:19
23 Air Mail Special (Good Enough To Keep) [first take] (Goodman, Mundy, Christian)  3:22


*


Cd. 4

1 All Star Strut (Mergentroid ?)  3:08
2 Honeysuckle Rose (Razaf, Waller)  3:02
3 Li'l Boy Love [third take] (Loesser, Hollander)  2:59
4 Solo Flight (78 rpm Version) [first take] (Christian, Mundy, Goodman)  2:47
5 All Star Strut (Mergentroid ?)  3:12
6 Li'l Boy Love [second take] (Loesser, Hollander)  2:58
7 Solo Flight (Christian, Mundy, Goodman)  2:47
8 Untitled Tune [breakdown]  1:35
9 Poor Butterfly [false start] (Golden, Hubbell)  0:29
10 I Surrender, Dear [breakdown] (Clifford, Barris)  1:04
11 I Surrender, Dear [breakdown] (Clifford, Barris)  1:10
12 Six Appeal (My Daddy Rocks Me) [breakdown] (Goodman)  1:05
13 Six Appeal (My Daddy Rocks Me) [false start] (Goodman)  0:19
14 These Foolish Things [false start] (Marvell, Strachey)  0:34
15 Tune Up & Blues [false start] (impro.)  0:17
16 Wholly Cats [breakdown] (Goodman)  0:54
17 Breakfast Feud [false start] (Goodman)  0:27
18 Breakfast Feud [false start] (Goodman)  0:09
19 Gilly [breakdown] (Goodman)  1:31
20 All Star Strut [breakdown] (Mergentroid ?)  1:18
21 Benny's Bugle [rehearsal sequence - part one] (Goodman)  14:19
22 Benny's Bugle [rehearsal sequence - part two] (Goodman)  9:18
23 March 13, 1941 Jam Session (Unknown, Goodman, Gaskill, McHugh
Hickman, Williams, Noble, Guarnieri, Christian)  21:03
a. Riffin' Around (unknown)  3:31
b. Waintin' for Benny (A Smo-o-o-oth One) (Goodman)  3:37
c. I Can't Believe That You're in Love with Me (Gaskill, McHugh)  6:20
d. Rose Room (Hickman, Williams)  4:01
e. I Hadn't Anyone Till You (Noble)  1:59
f. Blues (Guarnieri, Christian)  1:34

*

Personnel
Featuring Buck Clayton, Lester Young, Freddie Green, Walter Page, Jo Jones, Cootie Williams, Benny Goodman, Lou McGarity, Lionel Hampton, Jimmy Mundy, Nick Fatool, Les Robinson, Bob Snyder, George Auld, Count Basie, Charlie Christian, Artie Bernstein, Harry Jaeger, Johnny Guarnieri, Dave Tough, Harry James, Jack Teagarden, Benny Carter, Bob Haggart, Gene Krupa, Fletcher Henderson, Arnold Covey, Vernon Brown, etc.

Recorded at World Studios, New York City & Los Angeles, California ; between October 2, 1939 & March 13, 1941

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