Friday, February 13, 2015

Friday, August 22, 2014

Howard Roberts - The Magic Band Live at Donte's

Given the quasi-commercial nature of Robert's recordings for Capitol (as good as they were) the record buying public never really had the opportunity to hear what a hard swinger he was. And, while Roberts achieved praise and recognition from players as diverse as Clint Strong and Steve Morse for such albums as Dirty Guitar Player (Capitol SM1961) and Color Him Funky (Capitol T1887) these cuts, recorded around the same period (1968) and with a similar personnel reveal an altogether more adventurous and hard-hitting player. None of the CDs 5 cuts are weak and the sound quality is particularly good, given the circumstances of the recording. Highlights include a blistering "When Sunny Gets Blue", great melodic chord work on "Shiny Stockings" and the hard-hitting 'Take No Prisoners' introduction to Cole Porter's "All of You". The CD liner notes are beautifully presented and the 3 previously unpublished photographs of Roberts show him to be the very personification of a jazz guitarist. Indispensable !

Source : http://utstat.utoronto.ca/mikevans/hroberts/sounds/leader.html

Howard Roberts
The Magic Band Live at Donte's

Tracks

1 All of You (Porter)  13:30
2 Shiny Stockings (Foster)  15:50
3 All Blues (Davis)  12:40
4 Polka Dots and Moonbeams (Burke, Van Heusen)  12:26
5 When Sunny Gets Blue (Fisher, Segal)  17:17

*

Personnel
Howard Roberts - g
Steve Bohannon - org
Tom Scott - as, ss & ts
Chuck Berghofer - b
John Guerin - dr

Recorded live at Donte's, Los Angeles ; July, 1968

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Django Reinhardt 1935 (2) - Intégrale, vol. 3

During the nine months spent under contract with Ultraphone (late 1934 to late September 1935), the Quintet of the Hot Club of France was playing a repertoire that went far beyond the one actually recorded. It included a certain number of original compositions by its star soloists, only two of which actually found their way on to disc. Of these, Ultrafox is an obvious tribute to the record company itself (which also ran a budget label called Ultravox), while Djangology would be waxed almost as an afterthought, the very last instrumental number by the group for Ultraphone, its final three efforts being as accompanying group to singers. Djangology, one of his most characteristic compositions and personal favourites, would remain in Django’s repertoire for the remainder of his career, and he recorded it again on many future occasions. Strikingly intimate, the present rendering surely remains the most crystalline of all, revealing beyond all doubt Django’s immense talents as a composer, albeit one blithely ignorant of the rules of reading, writing and harmony. All the rest of the Quintet’s recordings from this period are made up, as might be expected, of old jazz warhorses (Tiger Rag, St. Louis Blues, I’ve Found A New Baby), well-established popular songs (Dinah, Avalon, Sheik Of Araby, Some Of These Days, Crazy Rhythm), new tunes still in search of an audience (Blue Drag, Chasing Shadows, Lily Belle May June, I’ve Had My Moments, Smoke Rings) and numbers from American musical comedies and films (Lady Be Good, The Continental). With these early memorable cuts by the Quintet, jazz was setting off down a totally new avenue, and one that was in no way American. True, the Joe Venuti-Eddie Lang violin-guitar pairing had laid the foundations of this sort of “chamber jazz” back in the 1920s, but the overall sound and concept of the Quintet was entirely new, and certainly very different from anything that had gone before. During these various sessions, Django, Grappelli and company played host to numerous guests. In addition to Jerry Mengo — a drummer of Italian origin brought up in England, whose playing and singing on Lily Belle May June, Sweet Sue and The Continental are equally approximate —, we also encounter a couple of American soloists then resident in Europe, Arthur Briggs and Frank “Big Boy” Goudie, and one or two young French jazzmen still keen to make a name for themselves, principal among them Alix Combelle.
Adapted by Don Waterhouse from the French text of Daniel Nevers
© Frémeaux et Associés SA 1996

 Source : http://www.fremeaux.com/index.php?option=com_virtuemart&page=shop.livrets&content_id=3767&
product_id=297&category_id=57 

Django Reinhardt
"Djangology"
The complete Django Reinhardt, vol. 3

(1935)

Cd. 1 

DJANGO REINHARDT & LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE
1 Lilly May June (Cooker, Sullivan)  3:15
2 Sweet Sue (Young, Harris)  2:52
3 Confessin’ (Daugherty, Reynolds)  2:52
4 The Continental (Conrad, Magidson)  2:58

PATRICK & SON ORCHESTRE DE DANSE
5 Miss Otis Regrets (Porter)  3:03
6 Waltzing with a Dream (Sasenko)  3:19

FREDDY TAYLOR AND HIS ORCHESTRA
7 Swanee River (Trad.) 3:03

PIERRE LORD
8 Simplement (Grappelli, Montreux, Féral)  3:09
9 Smoke Gets in Your Eyes (Kern, Palex, Hennevé)  2:47
10 Cocktails pour deux (Johnston, Coslow, Palex, Hennevé)  3:07

DJANGO REINHARDT & LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE
11 Blue Drag (Allen)  2:51
12 Swanee River (Trad.)  3:01
13 Ton doux sourire (Smith, Ray)  2:53
14 Ultrafox (Reinhardt)  3:19

GERMAINE & JEAN SABLON
15 Un amour comme le notre (Borel, Clerc)  2:59
16 La Petite île (Mireille, Nohain)  2:50

NANE CHOLET
17 Si j’avais été (Tranchant)  3:00
18 Fièvre (Moonglow) (Hudson, Mills, DeLange, Tranchant)  3:18

ALIX COMBELLE & SON ORCHESTRE
19 What a Difference a Day Made (Grover, Adams)  2:27
20 The Sheik of Araby (Wheller, Smith, Snyder)  2:17

*


Cd. 2 

PATRICK & SON ORCHESTRE
1 I Get a Kick out of You (Porter)  3:13
2 You and the Night and the Music (Schwartz, Dietz)  2:54
3 Seagulis (Lebovici)  2:46
4 Anything Goes (Porter)  2:31
5 Easter Parade (Berlin)  3:12
6 I’m Gonna Wash my Hands of You (Pola, Viena)  2:24

DJANGO REINHARDT & LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE,
AVEC ARTHUR BRIGGS & STÉPHANE GRAPELLY
7 Avalon (Rose, Jolson)  2:50
8 Smoke Rings (Gifford)  2:50

STÉPHANE GRAPELLY & LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE,
AVEC DJANGO REINHARDT
9. Clouds (Donaldson) 3’11
10. Believe It, Beloved (Johnson) 3’10

FRANCK “BIG BOG” GOODIE, AVEC SECTION RYTHMIQUE
11 I’ve Found a New Baby (Palmer, Williams)  2:40
12 St Louis Blues (Handy)  3:01

ALIX COMBELLE & LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE
13 Crazy Rhythm (Meyer, Kahn)  2:30
14 The Sheik of Araby (Wheeler, Smith, Snyder)  2:36

DJANGO REINHARDT & LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE,
AVEC STÉPHANE GRAPELLY
15 Chasing Shadows (Davis, Silver)  2:57
16 I’ve Had my Moments (Donaldson, Kahn)  2:56
17 Some of These Days (Brooks)  2:22
18 Djangology (Reinhardt)  2:54

NANE CHOLET
19 Ainsi soit-il (Tranchant)  2:52
20 Les Quatre farceurs (Tranchant)  2:42

BRUCE BOYCE, AVEC DJANGO REINHARDT & STÉPHANE GRAPELLY
21 Run Mary, Run / Didn’t It Rain (Trad./Arr. Burleigh)  2:37

*



Personnel
Feat. Django Reinhardt, Oscar Aleman ?, Roger Chaput, Joseph Reinhardt, Baro Ferret, Stéphane Grappelli, Michel Warlop, Sylvio Schmidt, Louis Vola, Louis Pecqueux, Eugène d'Hellemmes, Sigismond Beck, André Ekyan, Alix Combelle, Andy Foster, Maurice Cizeron, Chester Lanier, Fletcher Allen, Charles "Coco" Kiehn, Arthur Briggs, Alex Renard, Noël Chiboust, Gaston Lapeyronnie, Freddy Taylor, Charlie Johnson, Alphonse Cox, Guy Paquinet, Pierre Deck, René Weiss, Jean Chabaud, René Ronald, Alec Siniavine, Emil Stern, Roger Chomer, Maurice Chaillou, William Diemer, Jerry Mengo, Jerry Mengo, Freddy Taylor, Jean Sablon, Germaine Sablon, Hilldegarde Sell, Pierre Lord, Nane Cholet, Jean Tranchant, etc...

Recorded between February 3 & September 27, 1935

(See the complete artwork for all details, places, musicians, dates, etc.)

Django Reinhardt 1928-1934 (1) - Intégrale, vol. 1

This is a first double-album in a series that aims to present the recordings of Django Reinhardt in their entirety, whether those under his own name or those made as sideman/accompanist to others. Let us begin, however, by identifying four early sides of exceptional rarity that are missing from this opening volume, in the fervent hope that some reader may be able to provide us with a copy for inclusion later. The first two items, "Sur la Place de l’Opéra" and "E viva la Carmencita" sung by a certain Chaumel, make up record number 962 on the Henry label ; and the other two are from the March 1933 session by the “Boîte à Matelots” group [Cd. 2, # 6-9], Ensemble and Rêve de Printemps, issued as a coupling on Odéon 250.419. Django (Jean) Reinhardt was born in Liberchie, near Charleroi, Belgium, on 23 January 1910. On his birth certificate, his name was spelt “Reinhart”, while his Manouche gypsy family signed the same document “Reinhard”. Django himself, who had a slight but appealing lisp, hardly shed any light on the matter, for he learned to read (quite well) and write (less well) only during his adult life. Unsurprisingly, therefore, when this by now young banjoist made his first records in 1928 in the bands of accordion-players, the companies concerned struggled with his name. Gramophone simply ignored the problem by not mentioning him; Idéal presented him as “Jiango Renard”; while Henry were content to stick with “Jeangot”. As late as 1934-35, one could still even find “Jungo”! The leading accordionists of the day were highly impressed by this fearless, banjo-playing youngster, by now living in a caravan on the murky, no-man’s-land fringes of Paris. Jean Vaissade later recalled how “we almost found him too good, and we were always a little scared he might upstage us!” Which, because of the recording balance, is what Django virtually does on Vaissade’s 20 June 1928 session for Gramophone, which produced four published sides : "Ma Régulière", "Griserie", "Parisette" and "La Caravane", our opening items here. Regrettably, six other performances were rejected and destroyed. Around this same period, and perhaps even a short time before the above cuts, Vaissade recorded at least another six sides with Django in the line-up, this time for Idéal. All extremely rare, we are proud to confirm that they are nevertheless on offer here [Cd. 1, # 5-10]. Judging by the sound, it seems almost certain that, although made in 1928, these discs were made by the old acoustic method. Probably also acoustic recordings are the four sides with “Accordion Virtuoso ” Marceau on the Henry label, made a little later that same year [Cd. 1, # 12-15]. Here, banjoist “Jeangot” is in crackling form, and it is ironical to think that he himself almost certainly never heard these records. For these extremely rare sides suffered such laughably meagre distribution that, when Django died in 1953, nobody was even aware of their existence. They were rediscovered purely by chance some 30-odd years later. Still not rediscovered even today are the recordings Django made with the famous Alexander, probably for some little-known companies around 1927-28. “More than ten numbers,” the gypsy himself once recalled. Perhaps the elusive Monsieur Chaumel is once again involved, for it is widely believed the accordionist on the singer’s efforts for the Henry label was Alexander. Probability suggests that Alexander cut some further material at the same session, with Django still in the line-up but without the singer. But which sides are they ? Of four contenders so far unearthed, only one, "Parisette" [Cd. 1, # 11], features a banjo virtuoso of Django’s calibre. We leave you to judge for yourselves.
Adapted by Don WATERHOUSE from the French text of Daniel NEVERS
© FRÉMEAUX & ASSOCIÉS SA 1996 

Django Reinhardt
"Presentation Stomp"
The Complete Django Reinhardt, vol. 1
(1928-1934)

Tracks

Cd. 1

ORCH. MUSETTE JEAN VAISSADE
(1928)
1 Ma régulière (Borel Clerc)   2:59
2 Griserie (Bosc)  2:45
3 Parisette (Wolter)  2:42
4 La caravane (Moretti)  2:47
5 Amour de Gitane (Vaissade)  3:07
6 Aubade charmeuse (Vaissade)  2:47
7 Môme la gratiche (Puig)  2:50
8 L’Ondée (Vaissade, Silvestri)  2:39
9 La plus Belle (Darlay)  2:49
10 Déception d’Amour (Pourville, Silvestri)  3:05

L’ORCHESTRE ALEXANDER
(1928)
11 Parisette (Wolter)  2:22

MARCEAU ACCORDEONISTE VIRTUOSE
(1928)
12 Miss Columbia (Marceau)  2:14
13 Au pays de l’Hindoustan (Dehette)  2:39
14 Tarragone (Marceau, Pellemeule)  2:49
15 Moi aussi (Marceau, Dehette))  2:44

LOUIS VOLA ET SON ORCHESTRE DU LIDO DE TOULON
(1931)
16 Canaria (Laren, Vola)  2:38
17 C’est une valse qui chante (Grothe, Rotter, Waltham)  3:06
18 Carinosa (Larena, Pesenti)  2:56

ELIANE DE CREUS ET L’ORCHESTRE DU THEATRE DAUNOU
(1933)
19 Y en n’a pas deux comme moi (Bastia, Bastia)  3:13

L’ORCHESTRE DU THEATRE DAUNOU
(1933)
20 Ah ! la biguine (Bastia, Bastia)  2:45



Cd. 2

L’ORCHESTRE DU THEATRE DAUNOU
(1933)
1 Si j’aime Suzy (Bastia, Bastia)  2:22

ELAINE DE CREUS & JEAN SABLON
(1933)
2 Parce que je vous aime (Bastia, Bastia)  3:22
3 Si j’aime Suzy (Bastia, Bastia)  2:54

JEAN SABLON
(1933)
4 Le même coup (Bastia, Nivoix)  3:12
5 Je suis Sex Appeal (Bastia, Nivoix)  2:55

GUERINO ET SON ORCH. MUSETTE
(1933)
6 Brise napolitaine (Guérino, Peyronnin)  2:47
7 Vito (Lope)  2:30
8 Gallito (Lope)  2:59
9 Ne sois pas jalouse (Oberfeld, Pujol)  2:56

JEAN SABLON & L’ORCH. ANDRE EKYAN
(1934)
10 Le jour où je te vis (The Day You Came Along) (Johnston, Coslow, Palex, Hennevé)  3:11
11 Prenez garde au grand méchant loup
(Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf ?) (Churchill, Ponnell, Valaire, Valmy)  2:34
12 Pas sur la bouche (Sablon, Le Pelletier)  2:31

GERMAINE SABLON & L’ORCH. MICHEL WARLOP
(1934)
13 Un jour sur la mer (I Cover the Waterfront) (Green, Palex, Hennevé)  3:19
14 Ici l’on pêche [take 1] (Tranchant)  3:24
15 Ici l’on pêche [take 2] (Tranchant)  3:30
16 Toboggan (Parès)  2:47
17 Celle qui est perdue (Tranchant)  2:37

MICHEL WARLOP ET SON ORCHESTRE
(1934)
18 Presentation Stomp (Warlop)  3:06

GERMAINE SABLON & L’ORCH. MICHEL WARLOP
(1934)
19 La chanson du large (Tranchant)  3:20
20 J’suis pas un ange (Brooks)  3:17


*


Personnel
Featuring Django Reinhardt (Jiango Renard), Jean Sablon, Jean Vaissade, Maurice Alexander, Erardy, Faustin Jeanjean, Roger Jeanjean, Michel Emer, Max Elloy, Louis Vola, Michel Warlop, Mireille, "Tarteboule", Baro Ferret, Eugène d'Hellemmes, Stéphane Grappelli, Alix Combelle, etc...

Recorded between June 26, 1928 & March 16, 1934

See the complete artwork

Clara Haskil plays Mozart & Scarlatti (1950)

Can these recordings really be 50 years old ? They hardly sound their age. Even card-carrying audiophiles will be impressed with the Mozart Concerto’s ideal orchestra/piano balances and sonic warmth. Granted, the Winterthur Symphony Orchestra is less than a world-class ensemble, and you wish that the over-prominent oboe soloist played more elegantly. And what about that jarring ritard before the first movement cadenza? But you’re buying this disc for Clara Haskil’s extraordinary pianism in the service of music. In addition to her noted lyricism and grace, Haskil is not afraid to take the music’s drama by the reins and let things rip, as in the first movement development, or throughout the finale. What’s more, Haskil is on fresher, more incisive form here than in her 1960 stereo version with Igor Markevitch (the pianist’s final recording, in fact).
Once a long-sought-after rarity on the piano LP market, Haskil’s Westminster Scarlatti recital was reissued as a promotional tie-in with Philips’ Great Pianists of the 20th Century Edition. These miraculous performances belong in every serious piano collection. Haskil’s Scarlatti sonatas are paradigms of control, taste, color, ornamentation, and timing. Note, for example, her shifts in color and minuscule tempo fluctuations that heighten the G minor Kk 2 Sonata’s slippery major-minor shifts, or the E-flat Kk 193 Sonata’s exquisite trills and deliciously spun line. For some reason the sound is thinner and less full-bodied in the final three selections, but that doesn’t matter in light of the sublime music making. Discover Clara Haskil’s genius Scarlatti playing for yourself, then write Universal a big fat thank you note for reissuing these performances.
Jed Distler

Source : http://www.classicstoday.com/review/review-6217/

Clara Haskil
Plays
Mozart
Scarlatti

Tracks

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
(1756-1791)

Concerto for Piano and Orchtesra n° 20 in D minor, K. 466
1 Allegro  14:12
2 Romance  9:30
3 Allegro assai  7:24

Domenico Scarlatti
(1685-1757)

11 Sonatas
4 Sonata in C-sharp minor Kk 247  5:22
5 Sonata in Gmajor, Kk 3  1:45
6 Sonata in C major, Kk 132  5:54
7 Sonata in G minor, Kk 35  2:26
8 Sonata in E-flat major, Kk  193  4:08
9 Sonata in F minor, Kk 386  2:28
10 Sonata in F minor, Kk 519  2:48
11 Sonata in Amajor, Kk 322  2:53
12 Sonata in B minor, Kk 87  4:35
13 Sonata in C major, Kk 515  2:43
14 Sonata in F major, Kk 437  2:32

*


Personnel
Clara Haskil - p
Winterthur Symphony Orchestra
Henry Swoboda - dir.

Recorded in Winterthur, Switzerland ; September 1950 [Mozart] ; & October 1950 [Scarlatti]

Christian Zacharias plays Domenico Scarlatti, vol. 2 (16 Sonatas)

Christian Zacharias apparently discovered his "Latin" streak quite early. His many radio productions in France and French-speaking Switzerland, his exceptional affinity to the Latin lifestyle and Latin music-making, his French-directed films on Scarlatti and Schumann — this empty shows just how international this German artist is. And the Geneva Music Competition in 1969 and both the second prize and the Van Cliburn Competition in the U.S. in 1973 seem to suggest that the pianist, who was born in Germany in 1950, was better understood abroad than at home. This has changed, however. Just a few years ago, some purist critics were still tearing their hair because Zacharias was playing the middle movement of Mozart's Piano Concerto K. 467 or the opening movement of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata in the right tempo and with the appropriate expression. But he has since secured his permanent position in Germany's pianistic pantheon. He has performed at the top international venues, includung the festivals of Salzburg and Edinburgh, and is a welcome guest of the Berlin Philharmonic as well as of the New York Philharmonic, where he performed Mozart's demonic D minor Concerto under the direction of Mariss Jansons in early 1885. Here too, he stunned his audience with those sepctacular cadenzas which once upset many a humorless German critic : there was that awe-inspiring chord again, which suddenly shoved this highly expressive piano concerto into the netherwordly realm of Don Giovanni. It just happens that our overly familiar repertoire is still full of mysteries to be explored. And Christian Zacharias is one of the most remarkable explorer of our time...
Oliver Buslau, 1995. Translation Roger Clément, from the booklet

Christian Zacharias
Plays
Domenico Scarlatti
(1685-1757)

Tracks

1 Sonata in C minor, K22 (L 360). Allegro  2:56       
2 Sonata in D minor, K11 (L 352)  2:21
3 Sonata in C, K502 (L 3). Allegro  4:07
4 Sonata in G, K146 (L 349)  2:49
5 Sonata in D minor, K141 (L 422). Allegro  4:09
6 Sonata in A minor, K532 (L 223). Allegro  5:14
7 Sonata in A, K268 (L 41). Allegro  4:29
8 Sonata in G minor, K315 (L 235). Allegro  3:18
9 Sonata in C, K132 (L 457). Cantabile  6:48
10 Sonata in C, K515 (L 255). Allegro  2:43
11 Sonata in D minor, K213 (L 108). Andante  6:58
12 Sonata in D, K492 (L 14). Presto  3:50
13 Sonata in G minor, K426 (L 128). Andante  6:57
14 Sonata in G, K427 (L 286). Presto, Quanto Sia Possibbile  2:41
15 Sonata in A minor, K109 (L 138). Adagio  07:50
16 Sonata in A, K537 (L 293). Prestissimo  3:12

*

Christian Zacharias - p

Recorded in Riehen, Ladgasthof, Switzerland ; January 19-21, 1994

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Django Reinhardt 1934 (2)-1935 (1) - Intégrale, vol. 2

The darling of top French accordionists during the latter half on the 1929s (see vol. 1), by the 1934-35 period covered here Django Reinhardt had become an accompanist of a totally different nature. Following the lead of Jean Sablon, numerous were the popular singers now calling upon his services, first among them Germaine Sablon, Jean's sister, who often used the jazz backing of the Michel Warlop orchestra. During the course of our Volume 2, we shall also come across many more. After 1935, opportunities to accompany vocalists would become rarer, howewer, since Django and some of his principal cohorts were by then almost totally absorbed by the Quintet of the Hot Club of France. Even in the present volume, tucked away among the cooing of singers such as Léon Monosson and Le Petit Mirsha, we hear the historic Quintet's maiden efforts, that new, original jazz sound that captivated even the Americans...
Adapted by Don WATERHOUSE from the French text of Daniel NEVERS
© FRÉMEAUX & ASSOCIES, 1996

Django Reinhardt
"I Saw Stars"
The Complete Django Reinhardt, vol. 2
(1934-1935)

Tracks

Cd. 1

JEAN SABLON & TRIO
(1934)
1 Je sais que vous êtes jolie (Christiné, Poupon)  3:01
2 Par correspondance (Mireille, Nohain)  2:36

GERMAINE SABLON & L’ORCHESTRE. MICHEL WARLOP
(1934)
3 Tendresse (Aubert, Champlay)  3:05
4. J’ai besoin de toi (Coppola, Bourgeat)  3:21

MICHEL WARLOP ET SON ORCHESTRE
(1934)
5 Blue Interlude (Warlop)  3:18

TRIO DJANGO REINHARDT
(1934)
6 Tiger Rag (LaRocca)  2:19
7 After You’ve Gone (Creamer, Layton)  2:11
8. Confessin’ (Neiburg, Dougherty, Reynolds)  2:36

“DELAUNAY’S JAZZ” (QUINTETTE DU H.C.F.)
(1934)
9 I Saw Stars (Siegler, Goodhart, Hoffman)  2:41
10 Confessin’ (Neiburg, Dougherty, Reynolds)  2:46

ELIANE DE CREUS ET SES BOYS
(1934)
11 La Rumba-Da-Boum (Waltham, Jamblan, Olive)  3:16

AIMÉ SIMON-GIRARD (ORCH. MICHEL WARLOP)
(1934)
12 Cocktails pour deux (Cocktails for two) (Johnston, Coslow, Palex, Hennevé)  3:07

GERMAINE SABLON (ORCH. MICHEL WARLOP)

(1934)
13 Deux cigarettes dans l’ombre (Two cigarettes in the dark) (Pollack, Palex)  3:07

AIMÉ SIMON-GIRARD (ORCH. MICHEL WARLOP)
(1934)
14 L’amour en fleurs (Love in Bloom) (Johnston, Rainger, Palex, Hennevé)  3:01

GERMAINE SABLON (ORCH. MICHEL WARLOP)
(1934)
15 Je voudrais vivre (Sablon, Divert)  2:44

PATRICK ET SON ORCHESTRE DE DANSE
(1934)
16 From Now On (Brown, Freed)  3:02
17 I Saw Stars (Siegler, Goodhart, Hoffman)  3:01
18 Black Panther Stomp (DuPage)  2:49
19 Okay Toots (Donaldson, Kahn)  2:43
20 When my Ship Comes In (Donaldson, Kahn)  3:05
21 My Carolina Hide-a-way (Coots)  2:37

*


Cd. 2

LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE
(1934)
1 Dinah (Askt/Lewis/Young)  2:33
2 Tiger Rag (LaRocca)  2:33
3 Lady be Good (Gershwin, Gershwin)  2:53
4 I Saw Stars (Siegler, Goodhart, Hoffman)  2:28

JEAN SABLON
(1935)
5 La dernière Bergère (Siniavine, Sauvat)  3:02
6 The Continental (Conrad, Magidson, Palex, Hennevé)  2:56
7 Un Baiser (Coquatrix, Luc)  3:16

LE PETIT MIRSHA
(1935)

8.Vieni, vieni (Scotto, Vantard, Konyn)  2:53

LÉON MONOSSON & L’ORCHESTRE ALAIN ROMANS
(1935)
9 Deux cigarettes dans l’ombre (Pollack, Palex)  3:16
10 Tout le jour, toute la nuit (Night and Day) (Porter, Palex)  3:20

LE PETIT MIRSHA
(1935)

11 Maman, ne vends pas la maison (Trénet)  3:28
12 Petit homme, c’est l’heure de faire dodo (Little Man...) (Wayne, Hennevé, Plaex)  3:38

COLEMAN HAWKINS, ACC. PAR MICHEL WARLOP ET SON ORCHESTRE
AVEC ARTHUR BRIGGS
(1935)
13 Blue Moon (Rodgers, Hart)  3:14
14 Avalon (DeSylva, Jolson, Rose)  3:01
15 What a Difference a Day Made (Grover, Adams)  3:01

COLEMAN HAWKINS, ACC. PAR D. REINHARDT & S. GRAPPELLI
(1935)
16 Stardust (Carmichael, Parish)  3:10

PATRICK ET SON ORCHESTRE DE DANSE
(1935)
17 Hands Across the Table (Parish)  3:06
18 We Were so Young (Kern)  3:12
19 From You (McHugh, Fields)  2:53
20 Darling, je vous aime beaucoup (Sosenko)  3:17



*

Personnel
Featuring Django Reinhardt, Jean Sablon, André Ekyan, Noël Chiboust, Joseph Reinhardt, Alix Combelle, Stéphane Grappelli, Michel Warlop, Louis Vola, Roger Chaput, Guy Paquinet, Coleman Hawkins, Arthur Briggs, etc...

Recorded in Paris, between April 11, 1934 & March 4, 1935

See the complete artwork

Dave Brubeck - Jazz at Oberlin

The pianist and composer Dave Brubeck had more than his share of Great Moments : he was the first to sell a million copies of a jazz instrumental ; he was one of Time magazine's rare jazz cover subjects; he has played for presidents and popes; composed everything from classic jazz themes to symphonies; and the tune of his most famous hit, Take Five, is familiar to music lovers, from eight-year-olds to octogenarians.
Brubeck's first Great Jazz Moment is one that has been overlooked though – the making of his quartet's 1953 live album, Jazz at Oberlin. Not only did this dynamic gig reveal Brubeck's vivacious creative relationship with west coast alto saxophonist Paul Desmond to a new and youthful audience, confirming the then 29-year-old Desmond as a sensational sax improviser, it also indicated new directions for jazz that didn't slavishly mirror bebop, and even hinted at free-jazz piano techniques still years away from realisation. The significance of Jazz at Oberlin didn't stop with the music either. The enthusiasm of the college audience, audible throughout the album, marked Brubeck's eager adoption by America's (predominantly white) youth — a welcome that soon extended around the world, and brought the pianist chart hits for a rhythmically intricate instrumental jazz in a period in which the newly emerged rock'n'roll was carrying all before it.
Growing up on a California ranch, Brubeck learned classical piano from his mother and switched from veterinarian studies to music after his first college year. A conscientious objector in the second world war, he was given an army band to run instead, studied with the classical composer Darius Milhaud and founded his first quartet with Paul Desmond in 1951.
What came to be known as Brubeck's "classic quartet" (comprising of Desmond, bassist Eugene Wright and the astonishing polyrhythmic drummer Joe Morello) was still three years away when the Oberlin concert was recorded, though drummer Ron Crotty and bassist Lloyd Davis played the show with brisk empathy. At the same time the repertoire — variations on standard songs or bop anthems — gave no hint as to Brubeck's subsequent fascination with adventurous but very catchy time-signatures like 5/4 and 9/8, not to mention his adaptations of classical forms like rondos and fugues. Oberlin did, however, open a window on the core creative relationship that would soon ignite all those elements ("Take Five" was a collaboration, developed by Brubeck from a Paul Desmond theme), and revealed a wealth of harmonic and rhythmic references in the leader's own playing that would change the language of jazz.
In the 1950s, some hardcore jazz fans disliked Brubeck's music, seeing it as Europeanised and overly formal, something that flattered middle-class audiences but sold out its more fundamental virtues of soul, swing and blues. But from the late 1960s on, as jazz opened up to influences from other genres and cultures, sectarianism receded, and Brubeck began to be credited as a visionary. He was seen as an artist who took jazz into stimulating new contexts without destroying its essence. 

Source : http://www.theguardian.com/music/musicblog/2010/jan/11/dave-brubeck-jazz-at-oberlin

Dave Brubeck
Jazz at Oberlin

Tracks

1 These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You) (Marvell, Strachey)  6:33
2 Perdido (Tizol)  7:52
3 Stardust (Carmichael, Parish)  6:30
4 The Way You Look Tonight (Kern, Fields)  7:51
5 How High the Moon (Lewis)  9:11

*


Personnel
Dave Brubeck - p
Paul Desmond - as
Ron Crotty - b
Lloyd Davis - dr

Recorded in Finney Chapel, Oberlin College ; March 2, 1953

Django Reinhardt 1935 (3)-1936 (1) - Intégrale, vol. 4

In August 1935 the Hot Club’s soloists, Stéphane the violinist and Django the guitarist, along with Louis Vola on the string bass and Arthur Briggs on the trumpet, first entered the Polydor studios in the 13th district of Paris. In fact, Briggs had already made several recordings at the same address a couple of years previously unlike the others who made their debut in the rather basic Ultraphone studios near Montparnasse in late 1934 (see volumes 2 and 3). Grappelli and Reinhardt often performed during this period at “Stage B” which was in the same vicinity, with Briggs, Alix Combelle and the drummer Georges Marion. Despite the modest size of these studios,the sale of their records was impressive enough to attract the relatively new and dynamic British firm Decca Ultraphone (founded in 1929), who had distributed some of the Quintet’s records before directly contacting the musicians via Polydor who represented them on the continent. As a matter of fact, Polydor already intended to record Arthur Briggs again, as he had already made some successful recordings for the company in 1927 during a long stay in Berlin when he conducted the “Savoy Syncops’ Orchestra” and was considered as a true star. Polydor was of German origin (created in 1924 by the Deutsche Grammophon Aktien Gesellschatt, which itself was an old subsidiary of the Companie Internationale du Gramophone), and the French branch employed certain staff from head-office,as did many of the international phonographical companies. Thus, those responsible for the recording were from Berlin and Hanover and consequently knew nothing of French musicians until Arthur, Django, Stéphane and Louis came along. The first imported recording technician was called König who stayed from 1929 to 1933 (the initials “BKP” appear on his labels), and two others followed him, including Rudolf “Rudy” Hamburger who arrived in August 1935 and used the signature “HPP” (The “H” corresponding to his name, and the “P”’s stood for “Polydor” and “Paris”). Charles Delaunay was the first to make reference to their session which he witnessed in the Polydor studios on the 22 August, and where four tracks were recorded (Tiger Rag, Sweet Georgia Brown, Who and There’ll Be Some Changes Made). All four tracks (1950 - 1952 HPP) were surprisingly rejected, probably due to the technician’s inexperience rather than the musicians’ inadequate interpretation. The quartet had no doubt been tested several days previously, however, as a one-sided test pressing with the reference “E135” has been found where they played Bright Eyes by Otto Motzan, as was eventually identified by Alain Antonietto. The original now belongs to a famous French collector who also owns the two rejected versions of Chinatown, My Chinatown (2010 HPP and 2037 HPP). All three numbers will hopefully be issued shortly in a new Polydor series !
Adapted by Laure WRIGHT from the French text of Daniel NEVERS
© FRÉMEAUX & ASSOCIES, 1996


Django Reinhardt
"Magic Strings"
The Complete Django Reinhardt, vol. 4
(1935-1936)

Tracks

Cd. 1

NITTA RETTE ET SON TRIO “HOT”
1 Points roses (Berg, Jac, Rolland)  2:48
2 Un instant d’infini (Berg, Jac, Rolland)  3:27
3 Mon coeur reste près de toi (Stern, Elloy, Clargeac, Lemarchand)  3:08

QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE, AVEC DJANGO REINHARDT ET STÉPHANE GRAPPELLY
4 St. Louis Blues (Handy)  3:27

STÉPHANE GRAPPELLY AND HIS HOT FOUR (QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE)
5 Limehouse Blues (Braham, Furber)  3:08
6 I Got Rhythm (Gershin)  2:54

ANDRÉ PASDOC, ACCOMPAGNÉ PAR L’ORCHESTRE VOLA
7 Pourquoi, pourquoi ? (Emer, Jac)  2:54
8 Vivre pour toi (Bixio, Davson)  3:14

YVONNE LOUIS, ACCOMPAGNÉE PAR L’ORCHESTRE VOLA
9 Mirages (chasing shadows) (Silver, Palex, Hennevé)  2:55

JEAN SABLON
10 Cette chanson est pour vous (Ahlert, Young, Vantard, Konyn)  3:14
11 Darling, je vous aime beaucoup (Sosenko)  3:10

STÉPHANE GRAPPELLY AND HIS HOT FOUR (QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE)
12 I’ve Found a New Baby (Williams, Palmer)  3:02
13 It Was so Beautiful (Barris, Freed)  2:49
14 China Boy (Winfree, Boutelje)  2:59
15 Moonglow (Hudson, DeLange, Mills)  2:59
16 It Don’t Mean a Thing (Ellington)  3:01

GARNET CLARK AND HIS HOT CLUB’S FOUR
17 Rosetta (Hines, Woods)  2:38
18 Stardust (Carmichael, Parish)  2:30
19 The Object of my Affection (Poe, Grier, Tomlin)  2:44

*


Cd. 2

JEAN SABLON, AVEC ACCOMPAGNEMENT D’ORCHESTRE
1 Cette chanson est pour vous (Alhert, Young, Vantard, Konyn)  3:04
2 Rendez-vous sous la pluie (Hees, Trénet)  2:34

JEAN TRANCHANT, ACCOMPAGNÉ PAR MICHEL EMER ET SON ORCHESTRE
3 L’amour en voyage (Tranchant)  3:13

PROGRAMME RADIOPHONIQUE DU “MICRO DE LA REDOUTE”
4 Les Baisers prisonniers (Tranchant)  2:49
5 Mon bateau est si petit (Tranchant)  2:11
6 Quand il est tard (Tranchant)  3:40
7 Le Piano mécanique (Tranchant)  2:41
8 Ici l’on pêche (Tranchant)  3:21

JEAN SABLON ET SES AMIS (JEAN SABLON & HIS FRIENDS)
9 La Jambe en bois (Spencer)  0:57
10 Miss Otis Regrets (Porter, Palex, Hennevé)  4:51
11 Blue Drag n°2 (Allen)  2:24

YVONNE LOUIS AVEC ACCOMPAGNEMENT D’ORCHESTRE
12 Au grand large (Claret, Nac, François)  3:11

MICHEL WARLOP & SON ORCHESTRE
13 Cloud Castles (Van Hoorebeke)  3:10
14 Magic Strings (Van Hoorebeke)  3:25
15 Sweet Serenade (Van Hoorebeke)  3:10
16 Crazy Strings (Van Hoorebeke)  3:22
17 Novel Pets (Van Hoorebeke)  3:27
18 Budding Dancers (Van Hoorebeke)  2:38



*

Personnel
Featuring Django Reinhardt, Jean Sablon, Stéphane Grappelli, Joseph Reinhardt, Louis Vola, Jean Tranchant, André Ekyan, Michel Warlop, Naguine Reinhardt, Alix Combelle, Emil Stern, Pierre "Baro" Ferret, Antonio Rovira, Bill Coleman, Garnet Clark, etc.

Recorded in Paris, between September 6, 1935 & April 17, 1936

See the complete artwork

Christian Escoudé Plays the Music of John Lewis

Everything started in 542, when the army, leaded by Childebert, son of the French King Clovis, besieged the Visigoths in Saragosse. The Saint Germain des Prés starts to develop near the abbey that Childebert build up, counseled by bishop Germain, in order to shelter treasures of the surrendered Vandals, such as Saint Vincents’s tunic. This church and its monastery becomes rapidly the richest one in France and after the death of bishop Germain, its name is changed into Saint Germin des Prés.
The suburb continues to develop and becomes in the 17th century a center of literature and theater life. Artists meet in the cafés, already flourishing, such as "Procope" that opens in 1689 at the moment of the Saint Germain trade. Curiously and contrary to all the customs, it becomes the place where artists and clerics cohabit peacefully.
The Revolution in 1789 sounds the death knell for the powerful Benedictine abbey, successively destroyed by an explosion and by a fire. Still, the Saint Germain des Prés area continues its intellectual and artistic blossom, especially in the 19th century. Artists settle there, be it painters like Delacroix, Ingres and Manet, writers like Balzac and Georges Sand or actors like Mounet-Sully. The place becomes a meeting point of numerous intellectuals and artists who enjoy discussing about culture and actuality.
In the 20th century, the Saint Germain des Prés continues to be synonymous with literary and artistic life, with its numerous cafés that have created their own circles and even their own literature price. "Les Deux Magots" café sets up the Saint Germian des Prés Price whose first winner is Raymond Queneau for its book Le Chiendent. In his essay Le Piéton parisien (the Parisian pedestrian) Léon-Paul Fargue says of the three most important cafés ("Le Flore", "Les Deux Magots" et le "Lipp") that they are " real institutions, as famous as state institutions".
During the Second World War, while Parisians are subject to restrictions and curfew, those cafés are the last place of free exchange of opinions. Every day Jean – Paul Sartre et Simone de Beauvoir arrive early in the morning in one of the cafés in order to get the best seat, near the stove.
After the war, the avant - garde theater grows. At the Babylone Theater are played En attendant Godot de Samuel Beckett in 1953 and Amédée ou comment s’en débarasser de Ionesco. In 1956, Cocteau’s La machine à écrire is given at the "Odeon Theater" and Rhinocéros at the "Récamier Theater" in 1960.
Paintors and photographs are also attracted by Saint Germain des Prés : in 1937, Picasso finishes "Guernica" in his atelier in rue des Saints Augustins, where his friend Man Ray often comes to visit him.
Musicians are there too: Léo Ferré sings at "La Fontaine des Quatre Saisons", and musicians such as Georges Brassens, Jacques Brel, Charles Trénet, Guy Béart, Charles Aznavour and Serge Gainsbourg whether live in the area or are its regular visitors.
They all enjoy meeting at the cafés in the daytime and in the night in the famous cellars, such as " Le Bar Vert" or " Le Tabou" that caused such a scandal. In these cellars, artists listen to the New Orleans Jazz and the Be Bop, brought to the "Club Saint Germain" or to the "Blue Note" by Sidney Bechet, Miles Davis and Duke Ellington. Juliette Gréco and Anne-Marie Cazalis are the queens of those nights and launch the existentialist stream. By declaring itself "existentialist", the Saint Germain youth misinterprets Sartre’s philosophy and presenting his thought just as a scandalous trend annoys him considerably... 

Source : http://www.saint-germain-des-pres.com/english/default2.htm

Christian Escoudé
Saint-Germain-des-Prés
(The Music of John Lewis)

Tracks

1 Midnight in Paris (Lewis)  4:15
2 Django (Lewis)  7:23
3 Delauney's Dilemma (Lewis)  4:46
4 Milestones (Davis)  3:49
5 Milano (Lewis)  3:01
6 Saint-Germain-des-Prés (Lewis)  4:27
7 Concorde (Lewis)  3:10
8 Mirjana (Lewis)  4:04
9 La Ronde (Lewis)  3:52
10 Skating in Central Park (Lewis)  5:46
11 Afternoon in Paris (Lewis)  5:43

*


Personnel
Christian Escoudé - g & arr.
Stéphane Belmondo - tp & flghrn
Lew Tabackin - ts & fl
Jean-Baptiste Laya - g
Thomas Bramerie - b
Billy Hart - dr

Recorded at ICP Recording Studios, Brussels, Belgium ; July 9 & 10, 2012

Monday, August 18, 2014

Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli (1942-1943)

The war, wich prevented Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli from carrying out the summer tours which had been offered him after the Geneva victory (1939), did not hinder him giving concerts in Italy and recording his first discs. Among these figure the concertos by Robert Schumann and Edvard Grieg (Teldec 9031-76439-2), which the young pianist performed with the orchestra of the Teatro alla Scala of Milan, a body in whose symphonic seasons he had begun taking part from October 1940 (Beethoven's "Emperor" and Liszt's "Totentanz"). In that same period Michelangeli recorded the pages for piano solo which appear on this disc. As already mentioned, what strikes one today is the difference of this repertoire from the artit's later one, in which composers like J.-S. Bach and Edvard Grieg have no longer found a place.
Unusual is the presence of 18th-century composers by the harpsichord, like the younger Scarlatti and the forgotten Pellegrino Tomeoni, whom almsot no Italian pianist had in the repertore in those years. Probably under Anfossi's influence, Michelangeli applies himself in thse Baroque pages to seeking out a timbre suitable to reflect the colours of the original (it is a corner of the history of Italian usic which would see Michelangeli later concentrating on the sonatas of Baldassare Galuppi). The only compositions consistent with the repertoire of a young, recent winner of an international competition are the Berceuse and the Mazurka in B minor of Chopin. Even thses two jewels, however, appear permeated with an interpretative fever which, in the preciosity of sound, reveals something of decadence. It is this "liberty style" of the young Michelangeli which, combined with his personal fascination, in those years so intrigued his female audience. "Erotik", a little page from the third book of Lyriske smaastykker by the Norwegian, Edvard Grieg, reinforces this feeling. In Michelangeli's insinuating interpretation, "Erotik", a declaration of love that Grieg addressed to his wife Nina, recalls the ambiguity which the slightly "osé" title at first suggests.
Michel Selvini, translation Lionel Salter, from the booklet

Arturo Benedetti
Michelangeli
(1942-1943)

Tracks

Edvard Grieg
(1843-1907)

1 Erotik  3:18
(from "Lyriske Smaastykker", Op. 43 n° 5)

Johann Sebastian Bach
(1685-1750)

Italienisches Konzert in F major, BWV 971
2 [untitled]  3:45
3 Andante  4:40
4 Presto  3:29

Pellegrino Tomeoni
(1729-1816)

5 Allegro  2:41

Domenico Scarlatti
(1685-1757)

6 Sonata in D major, K.96, Allegro  5:07
7 Sonata in B minor, K.27, allegro  2:44

Frédéric Chopin
(1810-1849)

8 Berceuse in D-flat major, Op. 57  4:53
9 Mazurka in B minor, Op. 33 n° 4  5:07

*



Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli - p

Recorded September 6 [# 1] & 9 [# 8 & 9], 1942 ; & January 20 [# 6 & 7] & 22 [# 2-5], 1943

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Barry Harris Trio & Sonny Stitt

Barry Harris' debut Argo session captures a uniquely soulful interpretation of bop sensibilities. Light yet commanding, Breakin' It Up moves from strength to strength, belying the pianist's relative youth and inexperience. Paired with bassist William Austin and drummer Frank Gant, Harris dispenses with frills, paring familiar melodies like "Ornithology" and "All the Things You Are" to their absolute essentials. The overall approach is far more straight-ahead than his subsequent efforts, yet his signature melodic ingenuity is firmly in place. [The 2007 edition included bonus tracks.]
Jason Ankeny

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/breakin-it-up-bonus-tracks-r1079777

Barry Harris Trio
Sonny Stitt Quartet
Breakin' It Up
Burnin'
(1958)

Tracks

1 All the Things You Are (Kern, Hammerstein)  5:04
2 Ornithology (Parker)  3:31
3 Bluesky (Harris)  4:33
4 Passport (Parker)  3:43
5 Allen's Alley (Best)  2:56
6 Embraceable You (Gershwin, Gershwin)  3:55
7 Sro (Harris)  3:53
8 Stranger in Paradise (Wright, Forrest)  4:54
9 Lover Man (Davis, Sherman, Ramirez)  3:50
10 Koko (Parker)  3:59
11 How High the Moon ? (Lewis, Hamilton)  4:48
12 Easy Living (Robin, Rainger)  4:01
13 It's Hipper Than That (Stitt)  4:47
14 A Minor Sax (Stitt)  4:07
15 Reed and a Half (Stitt)  3:25
16 I'll Tell You Later (Stitt)  4:22
17 Look for Silver Lining (Kern, DeSylva)  4:30


*

Personnel
[# 1-8] Barry Harris Trio, Breakin' It Up, Argo LP 644
Barry Harris - p
William Austin - b
Frank Gant - dr
Recorded in Chicago ; July 31, 1958
[# 9-17] Sonny Stitt Quartet, Burnin', Argo LP 661
Sonny Stitt - as & ts
Barry Harris - p
William Austin - b
Frank Gant - dr
Recorded in Chicago ; August 1, 1958

Thursday, August 14, 2014

André Previn Quartet - My Fair Lady

Before he became a prominent orchestra conductor, André Previn was a talented jazz pianist based in Los Angeles. His firm touch, virtuosity and driving sense of swing were celebrated on jazz records he recorded for Contemporary and other labels. My Fair Lady represents Previn's second attempt to perform the music from the musical in a jazz setting. He had recorded a hit album for Contemporary as a member of drummer Shelly Manne's trio in 1956. After arranging for the film version of the musical in 1963 (for which he would receive the Academy Award), he went into the studio with a wonderful cast of musicians... The result is a swinging, sophisticated and eminently enjoyable jazz album.

Source : http://eastwindimport.com/product-info.asp?CategoryName=Rare+Reissues&PG=10&ProductID=1275

André Previn
Quartet
My Fair Lady

Tracks

1 You Dit it  3:13
2 The Rain in Spain  3:11
3 Without You  4:37
4 I Could Have Danced all Night  3:30
5 On the Street where You Live  3:55
6 With a Little Bit of Luck  3:08
7 I've Grown Accustomed to her Face  3:05
8 I'm an Ordinary Man  3:17
0 Wouldn't it Be Lovely ?  4:08
10 Get Me to the Church on Time  6:09

*

Personnel
André Previn - p
Herb Ellis - g
Red Mitchell - b
Frank Capp - dr

Recorded in Hollywood ; April 14 [# 4, 5, 9 10], 15 [# 3, 6 & 8] & 21 [# 1, 2 & 7], 1964