Friday, February 13, 2015

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Barney Wilen & Philippe Petit - Flashback

Few people will remeber that, in the early 80s, Barney Wilsn had all but disappeared from the Parisian jazz scene. It's true that he'd just come back from a long adventure — a voyage of initation during which he lost himself in the mysterious breezes and sand dunes of the African continent. For more than six years, he lived in Niger as well as in Mali, among the Touareg, Peuhl and Borogi peoples. In 1977, Barney suddenly reappeared in his hometown of Nice. In his own, unorthodox way, he tried to organise his own event there — the "burodujazz". He therefore staged jazz concerts in various parts of his town using his "jazzmobile".
In 1984, angry at not having been invited to take part in the "Grande Parade du Jazz", he launched his own event on a beach in the south of France, near La Baie des Anges. It was a spontaneous jam session which was to begin towards midnight, and finish at dawn. When he heard about this project, Philippe Petit rushed down to the beach to play with Barney. They carried on playing together for the next few nights. This seaside expedition was the first step towards a musical partnership and a strong friendship. Their subsequent musical alliance was to be called "(N) et".
Any number of musicians could join in, and "(N) et" therefore temporaryly became a quartet thanks to Riccardo del Fra and Sangoma Everett. "(N) et" also explored the realm of symphonic jazz with the help of 'l'Orchestre de Nice", 'l'Orchestre de Bordeaux-Aquitaine". Barney was then invited by Philippe to go to Paris where he was to play at Le Music Halle and La Chapelle des Lombards (original venue — these two clubs, have now disappeared). The success of these live shows encouraged Barney to get back to work on his saxophone and get back to grips with the excitement of playing live...
Pascal Anquetil, from the booklet

Barney Wilen
Philippe Petit
Flashback

Tracks

1 Blues Starch (Wilen, Petit)  12:42
2 Nuages (Reinhardt)  9:32
3 'Round Midnight (Monk)  9:35
4 Impressions of Paris (Petit)  2:18
5 Mr. Martin (Petit)  8:51
6 Flashback (Petit)  7:20
7 Mode a la Mode (Wilen, Petit)  8:06
8 Besame Mucho (Velasquez)  6:55

*


Personnel
Philippe Petit - g
Barney Wilen - ts

Recorded at the Jardins de la DRAC, during the Festival de Radio France, Montpellier, France ; July 19, 1986

Friday, October 31, 2014

Joe Morello - It's About Time

Awe-inspiring, stirring, soothing. These words can best describe the adventurous music led by legendary drummer Joe Morello. Here in this recording are tracks breathing alive with flair and resonance. The songs of spontaneous beauty, some speedy and some relaxed, seem to soar off the spinning black record. Others, such as the romantic, sullen "Every Time We Say Goodbye," seem to possess a dreamy, ethereal quality, delighting young couples toward a romantic mood. In the song "Just in Time," Morello sets the pace with a dashing, daring timbre, giving Phil Woods the freedom to explore melodically creative territory on his lush-sounding alto sax. Woods has been regarded as one of the finest sax soloists in the post-bop era. Gary Burton also receives creative expression to expand the record's musical variety in the use of a merry-go-round-like vibraphone. "Every limit in jazz and popular music has been stretched and broken with the passing years. Technical skills have been sharpened ; musicians have turned what was once dazzling virtuosity into the professional norm." These are the written words of music critic George Avakian, who sincerely expresses the fact that jazz as an art has evolved to enter new heights, a startling yet fascinating new frontier in its creative direction. Thanks are due to Morello, who toured with his musical compatriot Dave Brubeck and his quartet, playing to well-received crowds largely in the '60s. Morello, the percussionist that he is, gave the jazz and musical world new ground to explore, concerning the field of timbre and percussive measures. He improvs in everything, including 6/4, 3/4, and 5/4, in this collection of songs. Though present in the back of the group, his leadership provides tremendous drive and sweeping force, eagerly inspiring Woods and Burton to reach and express their musical senses. Gene Cherico adds the baritone flavor on his steady marching walking bass, while John Bunch displays sweeping melody notes sitting down at the piano. This record is compelling and free-spirited, giving listeners a delightful picture of some of the best in '60s jazz.
Shawn M. Haney

Source : www.allmusic.com/album/its-about-time-mw0000894206

Joe Morello
It's About Time

Tracks

1 I Didn't Know What Time It Was (Hart, Rodgers)  2:28
2 Time After Time (Cahn, Styne)  3:56
3 Every Time (Martin)  2:49
4 Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye (Porter)  3:01
5 Just in Time (Comden, Green, Styne)  4:10
6 Summertime (Gershwin, Gershwin, Heyward)  3:58
7 Time on My Hands (Adamson, Gordon, Youmans)  2:37
8 Mother Time (Woods)  4:03
9 Fatha Time (Bunch)  4:15
10 It's About Time (Albam)  5:04

*

Personnel
Phil Woods - as
Gary Burton - vb
John Bunch - p
Gene Cherico - b
Joe Morello - dr
Brass added on [# 1, 4, 7 & 10]

Recorded in Webster Hall and RCA Victor's Studio A, New York City ; 1961

See also
http://www.discogs.com/Joe-Morello-Its-About-Time/release/1612777

Monday, October 27, 2014

Joltin' Joe Roland

Other than a Bethlehem album in 1955 and a few obscure titles, all of vibraphonist Joe Roland's recordings as a leader are on this enjoyable CD reissue. Roland, best-known for an early '50s stint with George Shearing's Quintet, was a excellent vibist whose style fell somewhere between Terry Gibbs and Milt Jackson. He is paired in two 1954 quintets with either Freddie Redd (who plays conventional bop) and Wade Legge (sounding at his most eccentric) on piano. However the most memorable set is from 1950 for Roland is joined by guitar (Joe Puma), bass, drums and a string quartet. The writing for the strings (which is uncredited) is quite inventive and, although the strings do not solo, they sound very much like a jazz ensemble. It is particularly interesting to hear this instrumentation playing "Half Nelson," "Dee Dee's Dance" and Roland's original "Sally Is Gone"; guest singer Paula Castle does a fine job on the haunting "Love Is Just a Plaything." Recommended.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:wcfwxqtgldhe

Joe Roland
Joltin' Joe Roland

Tracks

1 Gene's Stew (Legge)  5:24
2 Spice (Legge)   4:26
3 Music House (Legge)  3:08
4 Joyce's Choice (Legge)  2:41
5 Garrity's Flight (Roland)  2:46
6 Indian Summer (Dubin, Herbert)  2:50
7 I've Got the World on a String (Arlen, Koehler)  4:39
8 Stephanie's Dance (Redd)  4:25
9 Half Nelson (Davis)  3:59
10 Love Is Just a Plaything (Lert & Jeffe)  2:27
11 Sally Is Gone (Roland)  2:58
12 Dee Dee's Dance (Best)  2:44

*

Personnel
[# 1, 2, 7 & 8]
Joe Roland - vb
Wade Legge - p
Dauti Martucci - b
Ron Jefferson - dr
Recorded on October 17, 1954
[#3, 4, 9 & 10]
Joe Roland - vb
Freedie Redd - p
Oscar Pettiford - b
Ron Jefferson - dr
Recorded on May 10, 1954
[#5, 6, 11 & 12]
Joe Roland - vb
Paula Castle - voc [# 6 only]
Joe Puma - g
Ish Ugarte - b
Harold Granowsky - dr
Sid Kassimir - cel
Mike Bartun - vla
Gus Oberstein - vl
Jules Modlin - vl
Recorded on January 17, 1950

George Shearing & Jim Hall - First Edition

This tasteful set matches together pianist George Shearing and guitarist Jim Hall in a program of duets. The fresh material (two originals apiece by Shearing and Hall, the obscure "I See Nothing to Laugh About" and just three standards challenge the pair and their quiet and subtle styles match together well. The pianist's tributes to Antonio Carlos Jobim and Tommy Flanagan are among the more memorable pieces in this interesting and somewhat unexpected musical collaboration.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/first-edition-mw0000076147

Jim Hall
George Shearing
First Edition

Tracks

1 Street of Dreams (Lewis, Young)  4:06
2 To Antonio Carlos Jobim (Shearing)  3:15
3 Careful (Hall)  5:54
4 I See Nothing to Laugh About (Fisher)  5:09
5 Without Words (Hall)  5:03
6 I Hear a Rhapsody (Baker, Fragos, Gasparre)  3:41
7 To Tommy Flanagan (Shearing)  5:10
8 Emily (Mandel, Mercer)  5:52

*


Personnel
George Shearing - p
Jim Hall - g

Recorded At Soundmixers, New York ; September, 1981

Curtis Counce - Exploring The Future

Bassist Curtis Counce was an in-demand player from the moment he arrived in Los Angeles in the late 40s. His group included pianist Carl Perkins, trumpeter Jack Sheldon and the incredible saxophonist Harold Land. Signed by Contemporary, they released two fine hard bop albums in 1956 and 1957. By the time of their Dootone album Exploring The Future — which featured an astounding cover of Counce in an orange spacesuit – Perkins had died and Sheldon had left the group. The record was exceptional, although different from their earlier material, the arrival of Elmo Hope on piano making for a busier sound.
Dean Rudland

Source : https://acerecords.co.uk/exploring-the-future-1

Curtis Counce
Quintet
Exploring The Future

Tracks

1 So Nice (Hope)  6:39
2 Angel Eyes (Brent, Dennis)  4:01
3 Into the Orbit (Hope)  4:45
4 Move (Williams)  2:32
5 Race for Space (Hope)  4:34
6 Someone to Watch over Me (Gershwin, Gershwin)  3:43
7 Exploring the Future (Williams)  6:16
8 The Countdown (Hope)  4:03
9 Foreplay (?)  6:44
10 Chasing the Bird (Parker)  6:33
11 Move [Unedited Version] (Williams)  4:19
12 Head Gear (aka The Countdown) [Unedited Version] (Hope)  5:36

*

Personnel
Curtis Counce - b
Harold Land - ts
Rolf Ericson - tp
Elmo Hope - p
Frank Butler - dr

Recorded in 1958

Gerry Mulligan - The Original Sextet

This two-disc, 28-track compilation gathers all of Gerry Mulligan's sides recorded with a short-lived sextet lineup in 1955 and 1956. Originally released as three LPs on the Emarcy and Mercury labels -- 1955's Presenting the Gerry Mulligan Sextet and A Profile of Gerry Mulligan and 1956's Mainstream of Jazz -- this material was recorded in New York City after Mulligan had returned to his hometown following the 1954 drug bust that ended his star-making Los Angeles group with Chet Baker. As a result, some call these sessions the first flowering of "West Coast" cool jazz on the Eastern Seaboard, but in point of fact, these tracks can be traced directly back to Mulligan's work with Miles Davis and Gil Evans on the Birth of the Cool sessions in 1949. As on those sides, Mulligan's primary musical sparring partner is a trombonist, Bob Brookmeyer, and the unusual pairing of Mulligan's baritone and Brookmeyer's trombone takes precedence over the more conventional trumpet (Jon Eardley and Don Ferrara) and tenor (Zoot Sims) parts. The primary difference here is in the rhythm section (drummer Dave Bailey and either Peck Morrison or Bill Crow on bass, with both Mulligan and Brookmeyer doubling on piano when necessary), which gooses the tempos in a way that Mulligan's more languid early groups rarely managed. Furthermore, unlike the earlier recordings, which had to be edited for 78 rpm play, this group is allowed to stretch out, leading to longer and more daring solos. The sextet never became the hot group of the moment in the way that the Mulligan and Baker lineup did, but this set beautifully showcases their gifts. As an added gift, the second disc includes eight rare and unissued alternate takes, including both sides of a 1955 single pairing greatly reduced versions of "Sweet and Lovely" and "Bernie's Tune."
Stewart Mason

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/the-original-sextet-complete-studio-master-takes-mw0001170379

Gerry Mulligan
The Original Sextet
(Complete Studio Master Takes)

Tracks

Cd. 1

1 Mud Bug (Lloyd)  5:07
2 Sweet and Lovely (Arnheim, LeMare, Tobias)  5:07
3 Apple Core (Mulligan)  5:29
4 Nights at the Turntable (Mulligan)  4:39
5 Broadway (Woode, McRae, Bird)  6:39
6 Everything Happens to Me (Adair, Dennis)  5:25
7 The Lady is a Tramp (Rodgers, Hart)  5:13
8 Bernie's Tune (Leiber, Stoller, Mulligan)  6:46
9 Makin' Whoopee (Donaldson, Kahn)  4:06
10 Demanton (Eardley)  5:43
11 Duke Ellington Medley : Moon Mist/In a Sentimental Mood (Ellington)  4:29
12 Westward Walk (Aka Westwood Walk) (Mulligan)  4:26
13 La Plus Que Lente (Debussy)  3:30
14 Blues (Mulligan)  8:17 

*


Cd. 2
1 Elevation (Mulligan, Lawrence)  6:51
2 Mainstream (Mulligan)  6:49
3 Ain't it the Truth (Basie, Harding, Palmer)  5:24
4 Igloo (Lloyd)  6:58
5 Blues at the Roots (Mulligan)  5:43
6 Lollypop (Hamilton, Wiggins)  5:53
7 Blues (Mulligan)  7:01
8 The Lady is a Tramp (Rodgers, Hart)  5:42
9 Demanton (Eardley)  5:41
10 Broadway (Woode, McRae, Bird)  6:37
11 Sweet and Lovely (Arnheim, LeMare, Tobias)  2:46
12 Bernie's Tune [short version] (Miller, Leiber, Stoller)  2:40
13 Westwood Walk (Mulligan)  5:22
14 La Plus Que Lente (Debussy)  3:39 

*



Personnel
[Cd 1, # 1, 8 & 11 - Cd. 2, # 7-9]
Jon Eardley - tp
Bob Brookmeyer - tb & p [# Cd. 1, # 6]
Peck Morrison - b
Dave Bailey - dr
Recorded in New York City ; September 21, 1955
[Cd 1, # 2, 3, 12 & 14 - Cd. 5, # 10-12]
Same as above
Recorded in New York City ; September 22, 1955
[Cd 1, # 4-7 & 10]
Same as above
Recorded in New York City ; October 31, 1955
[Cd 2, # 2, 3, 13 & 14]
Jon Eardley - tp
Bob Brookmeyer - tb
Zoot Sims - ts
Gerry Mulligan - bs
Bill Crow - b
Dave Bailey - dr
Recorded in New York City ; January 25, 1956
[Cd 1, # 9 & 13 - Cd. 2, # 1, 4 & 6]
Don Ferrara - tp
Bob Brookmeyer - tb
Zoot Sims - ts
Gerry Mulligan - bs
Bill Crow - b
Dave Bailey - dr
Recorded in New York City ; September 26, 1956

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Bud Shank & Clare Fischer - Brasamba !

One of the greatest albums of Brazilian jazz that Bud Shank ever recorded – done with a style that's a lot more like some of the best bossa albums from Rio at the time! Bud's recorded in other bossa settings before – but there's something about this record that really gets the whole thing right – as Shank's alto and flute come into play with a killer combo that includes Clare Fischer on piano, Larry Bunker on vibes and drums, Joe Pass on guitar, and Milt Holland and Chuck Flores on percussion. The added percussion really brings a lot to the set – and gives it a strongly bossa-driven groove that really lets Shank take off on alto and flute solos. Fischer's piano is remarkably strong – caught at that clear early point in his career when he was such a fresh voice on the scene. The whole thing's wonderful overall – and if you think you might have it under another name, check the song listings – because we bet you don't! Titles include "Sambinha", "Gostoso", "Elizete", "O Barquinho", "Brasamba", and "Otem A Note".
© 1996-2013, Dusty Groove, Inc.

Source : http://w3.dustygroove.com/item.php?id=6hsr5yk29k&ref=index.php

Bud Shank
Clare Fischer
Brasamba !
(Pacific Jazz Stereo 1963)

Tracks

1 Brasamba (Shank)  3:53
2 Otem A Note (Fischer)  4:14
3 Autumn Leaves (Les Feuilles Mortes) (Prévert, Kosma)  4:04
4 Sambinha (Shank)  3:38
5 Gostoso (Fischer)  3:55
6 If I Should Lose You (Robin, Rainger)  2:57
7 O'Barquinho (Menescal, Boscoli)  3:26
8 Serenidade (Fischer)  3:19
9 Elizete (Fischer)  4:16
10 Samba De Orfeu (Bonfa, Maria)  3:02

*

Personnel
Bud Shank - fl & as
Clare Fischer - p
Joe Pass - g
Ralph Peña - b
Larry Bunker - vb & dr
Milt Holland & Chuck Flores - perc

Recorded at Pacific Jazz Studios, Hollywood, California ; 1963

Stu Williamson Plays

Stu Williamson led relatively few sessions in his career and over half of them are on this excellent [Bethlehem] CD. The cool-toned trumpeter is mostly heard in a quintet with altoist Charlie Mariano, pianist Claude Williamson (his brother), either Max Bennett or Leroy Vinnegar on bass, and Stan Levey or Mel Lewis on drums. The remaining four songs (all Bill Holman compositions) feature a sextet with Holman on tenor, baritonist Jimmy Giuffre, Claude, Vinnegar, and Lewis. The music swings lightly but firmly with excellent solos from all concerned, making this CD a prime example of West Coast jazz from the 1950s. Recommended.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:wvftxqygldse

Stu Williamson
Stu Williamson Plays

Tracks

1 Slugger (Williamson)  3:18
2 There Will Never Be Another You (Nelson, Bergner)  3:08
3 Autumn In New York (Duke)  2:37
4 Sunday (Miller, Conn, Styne, Krueger)  3:14
5 The Lady is a Tramp* (Rodgers, Hart)  4:15
6 Yardbird Suite* (Parker)  3:49
7 Sapphire (Williamson)  3:21
8 The Things We Did Last Summer* (Styne, Cahn)  2:49
9 Strike Up the Band (Gershwin, Gershwin)  3:52
10 Don't Get Around Much Anymore (Russell, Ellington)  3:28
11 Stu's Dues Blues* (Williamson)  5:38

*

Personnel
Stu Williamson Quintet

Stu Williamson - tp
Charlie Mariano - as
Claude Williamson - p
Max Bennett or Leroy Vinnegar* - b
Stan Levey or Mel Lewis* - dr

Recorded in Los Angeles, California ; January 18 & 20*, 1955

*

Stu Williamson
Stu Williamson

Tracks

12 Pee Jay (Holman)  3:27
13 Just Friends (Lewis, Klenner)  4:23
14 Darn That Dream (VanHeusen, DeLange)  3:46
15 Hungry Child (Holman)  6:07
16 Big Red (Holman)  4:28
17 Red Cross (Parker)  5:03
18 Talk Of The Town (Cohn, Kahn)  3:18
19 Oom's Tune (Mariano)  3:56
20 Rose Bud (Holman)  4:57

*

Personnel
Stu Williamson Septet
Stu Williamson - tp
Charlie Mariano - as [# 3/7]
Bill Holman - ts [# 6/9]
Jimmy Giuffre - bs [# 6/9]
Claude Williamson - p
Leroy Vinnegar - b
Mel Lewis - dr

Recorded in Los Angeles, California, January 13, 1956
________
The younger brother of pianist Claude Williamson, Stu Williamson was a fixture on West Coast jazz dates of the 1950s. He moved to Los Angeles in 1949 and spent periods playing with Stan Kenton (1951), Woody Herman (1952-1953), and Kenton again (1954-1955), in addition to shorter stints with Billy May and Charlie Barnet. The mellow-toned Williamson, best-known for his association with Shelly Manne (off and on during 1954-1958), was on a countless number of sessions up until 1968 when he dropped out of the music scene. A drug addict, Stu Williamson spent most of his last two decades struggling outside of music.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=11:kifyxq85ldte


See also
http://www.jazzdisco.org/bethlehem-records/discography-1955/
http://www.jazzdisco.org/bethlehem-records/discography-1956/

Mary Osborne - A Girl and Her Guitar '59

Mary Osborne (1921-1992) began her musical career in Minot, North Dakota before she was 11 years old. In a few years she was doing radio work and soon was playing with some of the big bands then playing in the upper Midwest. She met Charlie Christian in North Dakota and she was heavily influenced by his style. But, like most of the great players she also developed her own unique approach and sound.
In the late 1930’s she moved east to Pittsburgh and later to New York. There her talents as a jazz player caught the ear of some of the jazz greats like Coleman Hawkins, Dizzy Gillespie and Art Tatum all of whom used her as rhythm and solo guitarist in their bands. In the period of 1945 – 1947 she made a number of recordings with several important jazz figures; Mercer Ellington, Mary Lou Williams, Coleman Hawkins, Stuff Smith and Meryl Booker.
During that same period she formed her own group, The Mary Osborne Trio in which she also supplied the vocal interest. Her trio made a series of successful public performances and recordings that were originally released on 78 RPM records. She later gave up the trio format to perform on her own at clubs and on TV where she played on the Arthur Godfrey and Ted Steele shows.
In the 1950’s she recorded with Tyree Glenn and produced a long playing record under her own name, A Girl and Her Guitar.
In 1968 Mary Osborne moved to Bakersfield, California where she operated the Osborne Guitar Company and performed in local venues. In 1977 she made a recording with Marian McPartland entitled Now’s The Time with a lineup of some of the best women jazz musicians of the day. In 1982 Stash records released Now And Then which included new material and material from A Girl and Her Guitar.
Mary Osborne died in Bakersfield, California in 1992.

Source : http://classicjazzguitar.com/artists/artists_page.jsp?artist=21

Mary Osborne
A Girl and Her Guitar
(1959)

Tracks

1 I Love Paris (Porter)  2:45
2 I Let A Song Go out of My Heart (Ellington, Nemo, Mills, Redmond)  2:47
3 How High The Moon (Hamilton, Lewis)  2:50
4 When Your Lover Has Gone (Swan)  3:45
5 Mary's Goodbye Blues (Osborne)  4:35
6 I Found A New Baby (Palmer, Williams)  3:04
7 Sophisticated lady (Ellington, Parish, Mills)  4:14
8 I'm Beginning To See The Light (James, George, Ellington Hodges)  2:29
9 Body And Soul (Green, Heyman, Sour, Eyton)  2:50
10 I Surrender Dear (Barris, Clifford)  2:54
11 These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You) (Link, Strachey, Marvell)  3:08

*

Personnel
Mary Osborne - g
Daniel Barker - g
Tommy Flanagan - p
Tommy Potter - b
Jo Jones - dr

Recorded 1959



See also : http://www.vintageguitar.com/8559/mary-osborne/

Barney Kessel Plays Standards

Guitarist Barney Kessel teams up with Bob Cooper (mostly on oboe but also doubling a bit on tenor), either Claude Williamson or Hampton Hawes on piano, Monty Budwig or Red Mitchell on bass, and Shelly Manne or Chuck Thompson on drums. Other than his own "64 Bars on Wilshire" and "Barney's Blues," the repertoire on this CD reissue is comprised of jazz standards. Inventive frameworks and the utilization of Cooper's jazz oboe (a real rarity in jazz of the time) give the otherwise boppish reissue its own personality.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/kessel-plays-standards-mw0000188271

Barney Kessel
Plays
Standards

Tracks

1 Speak Low* (Nash, Weill)  2:45
2 Love Is Here to Stay* (Gershwin, Gershwin)  3:26
3 On a Slow Boat to China* (Loesser)  3:18
4 How Long Has This Been Going On ?* (Gershwin, Gershwin)  3:20
5 My Old Flame (Coslow, Johnston)  3:39
6 Jeepers Creepers (Mercer, Warren)  3:51
7 Barney's Blues* (Kessel)  3:00
8 Prelude to a Kiss* (Ellington, Gordon, Mills)  3:13
9 A Foggy Day* (Gershwin, Gershwin)  3:10
10 You Stepped Out of a Dream (Brown, Kahn)  2:53
11 I Didn't Know What Time It Was (Hart, Rodgers)  3:57
12 64 Bars on Wilshire* (Kessel)  3:17


*


Personnel
Barney Kessel - g
Bob Cooper - ts & ob
Hampton Hawes or Claude Williamson* - p
Monty Budwig* or Red Mitchell - b
Shelly Manne* or Chuck Thompson - dr

Recorded in Los Angeles, California ; June 4 [# 1-4] and July 1 [# 7-9 & 12], 1954 and September 12 [# 5, 6, 10 & 11], 1955.

The Chico Hamilton Trio

These are among the most resourceful jazz trio sessions recorded on the West Coast during the prolific Fifties, replete with all the power, invention and tremendous feeling of the original Chico Hamilton trio. Chico’s drumming is superbly complemented by the remarkable musicianship of veteran bassist, George Duvivier, and by two highly creative thennewcomers : guitarists Howard Roberts [# 1-8] and the great Jim Hall [# 9- 11]. Notable for its consistently imaginative interplay, the playing is also characterized by a surprisingly extensive range of dynamics, tone colors, and rhythmic devices for a trio with this instrumentation. And the writing, variety throughout. Marked by Hamilton’s taste, intelligence and innate sense of drama, the set as a whole adds up to an unforgettable musical experience.

Source : http://www.freshsoundrecords.com/record.php?record_id=4903

The
Chico Hamilton
Trio

Tracks

1  Broadway (Wood, McRae, Boyd)  3:06
2 Street Of Drums (Hamilton)  3:17
3 What Is There To Say ? (Duke, Harburg)  2:51
4 Nuttye (Cheatmann)  2:30
5 Buddy Boo* (Colette)  2:42
6 Uganda* (Hamilton, Duvivier)  4:41
7 Lollypop* (Wiggins, Hamilton)  2:17
8 We’ll Be Together Again* (Fisher, Laine)  2:55
9 Autumn Landscape (Duvivier)  3:41
10 Porch Light (Duvivier)  3:59
11 Blues On The Rocks (Duvivier)  3:05
12 Skynned Strings (Duvivier, Hamilton)  5:14

*

Personnel
[# 1-8]
Howard Roberts - g
George Duvivier - b
Chico Hamilton - dr
Recorded Sound Stage Studio, Hollywood, December 6, 1953 ; [*] same place ; October 2, 1954.
[# 9-12]
Jim Hall - g
George Duvivier - b
Chico Hamilton - dr
Recorded Music Box Theatre, Hollywood ; February 8, 1956.

Herb Ellis - Thank You, Charlie Christian

Thank You Charlie Christian pays homage to the legendary jazz guitarist in a manner most appropriate to an innovator of his stature — rather than merely imitate that which is inimitable, Herb Ellis channels the imagination and expressiveness of his hero to create a lean, mean sound far more forward-thinking than nostalgic. Like Christian, Ellis favors feeling over flash and economy over excess — paired here with pianist Frank Strazzari, bassist Chuck Berghofer, cellist Harry Babasin and drummer Kenny Hume, he creates a series of compact and determinedly contemporary bop snapshots in vivid Technicolor, not the black-and-white of a bygone era. A beautiful and heartfelt record that draws from the past but refuses to live in it.
Jason Ankeny

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:jzfwxqugldke

 Herb Ellis
Quintet
Thank You, Charlie Christian

Tracks

1 Pickly Wickley (Ellis)  3:17
2 I Told Ya I Love Ya, Now Get Out (Carter, Ellis, Frigo)  2:52
3 Cook One (Ellis)  2:54
4 Karin (Ellis)  4:41
5 Cherry Kijafa (Ellis, Thomas)  4:17
6 Thank You Charlie Christian (Ellis)  7:38
7 Alexander's Ragtime Band (Berlin)  2:52
8 Lemon Twist (Troup)  2:48
9 Everything's Pat (Ellis)  3:35
10 Workin' with the Truth (Ellis)  1:58

*

Personnel
Herb Ellis - g
Harry Babasin - cel
Frank Strazzari - p
Chuck Berghofer - b
Kenny Hume - dr

Recorded on July 1 & 2, 1960

The Tal Farlow Album

For guitarist Tal Farlow’s second album as a leader (following a very obscure effort for Blue Note), he is joined by rhythm guitarist Barry Galbraith, bassist Oscar Pettiford and drummer Joe Morello on eight numbers, and pianist Claude Williamson and bassist Red Mitchell for the remaining four. Farlow is heard in his early prime. Thirty-two at the time, he was a brilliant technician who could play extremely fast, yet clean and with a light touch. His solos on the 11 standards (which include Pettiford’s “Blues in the Closet,” “Stompin’ at the Savoy” and “You and the Night and the Music"), plus his own “Gibson Boy,” are hard-swinging and creative, yet thoughtful. [Originally released in 1954, "Tal Farlow Album" was finally reissued on CD in 2002 and includes bonus tracks.]
Scott Yanow, All Music Guide

Source : http://shop.mtv.com/viewproduct.htm?productId=7226696

Tal Farlow
The Tal Farlow Album

Tracks

1 If There Is Someone Lovelier Than You (Schwartz, Deitz)  2:42
2 With the Wind and the Rain in Your Hair (Edwards, Lawrence)  2:59
3 My Old Flame (Coslow, Johnston)  3:33
4 Gibson Boy (Farlow)  2:43
5 Love Nest (Harbach, Hirsch)  2:42
6 You and the Night and the Music (Dietz, Schwartz)  3:40
7 Ev'rything I've Got (Hart, Rodgers)  3:27
8 Blues in the Closet (Pettiford)  2:48
9 Tea for Two (Caesar, Youmans)  2:55
10 This is Always (Warren, Gordon)  3:04
11 Lullaby of the Leaves (Petkere, Young)  3:45
12 Stompin' at the Savoy (Goodman, Razaf, Sampson, Webb)  3:15


*

Personnel
[# 1-8]
Tal Farlow - g
Barry Galbraith - g
Oscar Pettiford - b
Joe Morello - dr
Recorded at Fine Sound. New York City :
June 2nd 1954
[# 9-12]
Tal Farlow - g
Claude Williamson - p
Red Mitchell - b

Recorded at Radio Recorders, Hollywood, Los Angeles ; April 25th 1955

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Ruby Braff - Blowing Around the World

"I’ve always hated the trumpet. I didn‘t choose it. I wanted the B flat tenor saxophone. When my folks went to the store and saw what they thought was a tenor (it was actually a baritone), they said : “This is ridiculous”. They brought home this peculiar thing with valves on it, which I hated for ever. Never did care for it.
In school sometimes there would be an instructor that would give you lessons, but not very much. Unfortunately, I’m mostly self–taught. I hope to fix that one of these days.
As for inspirations—I never even knew what Louis Armstrong was. I only heard people talk about artists that were on the radio or on the screen—the Tommy Dorseys, the Artie Shaws, that sort of thing. And they looked like they were having such a marvellous, glamorous life, living in hotels, so well–dressed. It seemed like the epitome of luxury. I had no idea that they were all miserable! My first records were made in Boston, for a label called Storyville, and for Savoy Records, with Edmond Hall and Vic Dickenson. But they were terrible recordings—off broadcasts, mainly. Very sad things. I couldn’t play, either. The one made in a club where you could hear the audience more than the music was one of the better records.
Sure, they’ve made statements about my supposedly combining a modern approach with a feeling for traditional forms. Well, people say all sorts of things, because they want to categorise and label. I’ve only ever had two labels. Either it’s good or it stinks.
It always makes me laugh. If you heard David Oistrakh, would you say to him : “Man, what bag are you in ?” No, you wouldn’t. Yet they say that to a musician who has spent 30 or 40 years trying to evolve a way of playing.
So it’s silly. Is he playing good or isn’t he ? That’s the only thing that counts. But I know a lot of people don’t agree with me; Particularly the critics. They must put labels on music, so they can have it like canned goods on their shelf.
The truth of the matter is : there are a couple of idioms of music, the so–called symphonic world and the improvisational world of jazz, an American music which is a mixture of European ingredients, the Negro cultures from New Orleans. and Tin Pan Alley.
It’s also silly to keep talking about the blues as the most vital part of jazz. The blues is just a 12–bar series of chord changes which doesn’t really mean that much. How does somebody play a well–written, well–constructed song, keeping the character of it and then adding something to it ? I think that’s important..."

Ruby Braff
Blowing Around The World
(1959)

Tracks 

1 In A Little Spanish Town (Wayne, Lewis, Young)  3:09
2 April in Paris (Harburg, Duke)  3:47
3 Russian Lullaby (Berlin)  3:48
4 Too-Ra-Roo-Ra-Loo-Ra (Shannon)  4:06
5 Nagasaki (Warren, Dixon)  5:02
6 Song of India (P.D.)  3:18
7 Come Back to Sorrento (P.D.)  4:30
8 South Of the Border (Kennedy, Carr)  6:37
9 Loch Lomond (P.D.)  3:53
10 Chinatown My Chinatown (Schwartz, Jerome)  3:06

*

Personnel
Ruby Braff - tp
Bob Brookmeyer - p
Barry Galbraith - g
Joe Benjamin - b
Buzzy Drootin - dr

Recorded in 1959
________
"...I don’t know what they mean by “blues feeling”. That’s a very mysterious phrase to me. I’ve heard it applied to players that are incredibly horrible, ridiculous musical morons.
These congenital idiots play insipid nonsense and they say: “Man, don’t he play the blues!” I wouldn’t want anyone to think that I play the blues if that’s what they imagine it is. Who cares about blues, anyway ? Admittedly. it’s part of the folk heritage. There were many singers who made up millions of variations on those same kind of chords, sometimes with a few different changes here and there — Handy would have a few. Jelly Roll Morton was very inventive when it came to writing blues; they all have a little character of their own.
But the guys who are praised for playing the same set of changes, the same amount of foolish notes all the time — can they play anything else ? As a matter of fact, when they play some other tune, it sounds like they’re still playing the blues. After all, you’re supposed to be composing something while you’re playing. Or trying to.
I love to worry about composition when I play. There is no other way to know if someone is talented or not, outside of whether what he plays hangs together in a composite form.
How else can we tell ? Whether he’s drumming, singing, whistling, dancing or whatever, it must hang together.
And if it doesn’t, I can’t see how people read things into it. On what basis do they judge talent—reading ability, how fast he can run the notes ? Out of a symphony of 180 musicians, there’s liable to be three that have talent. They can all play their instruments beautifully that has nothing to do with having talent.
Talent is something that very few people have, really. And there are no geniuses. Maybe Louis and Duke are something in jazz. But they keep throwing these words around. If Albert Einstein is a genius, for example, how can Albert Ayler be a genius ? It’s ridiculous. It doesn’t make any sense.
There’s more talent than there are geniuses, but not everybody was born to write or play. I think they’d be much better off if they would just try to love what they’re doing, forget all the meaningless words, and let the axe fall where it may."
Ruby Braff (Talking in 1968)

Source : http://www.jazzprofessional.com/interviews/Ruby%20Braff_1.htm
________
L'Avis du Patron
Ruby Braff, c'est pas rien. C'est un peu le Cornet fait homme, ou plutôt l'Homme fait Cornet... Il y avait la Femme-Canon ; il y eut l'Homme-Cornet... Pas le cornet de Glace, non, le cornet musical. Et ce disque, rareté insigne, faut-il le répéter ? en compact, est également, ni plus ni moins, un de ses meilleurs enregistrements. Non seulement parce que Ruby est un As du Cornet, mais aussi parce qu'il est, ici, supérieurement accompagné. Petit combo de tout premier plan : Bob Brookmeyer au... piano (oui, M'sieurs Dames !) ; et l'Impérial Barry Galbraith à la guitare, etc. etc. En un mot : Royal ! Euh, pardon ! Impérial !

Both Sides of Tony Scott

Records by clarinetist Tony Scott are mostly quite scarce, including this long out-of-print LP. Scott, whose cool tone and boppish solos made him a standout (and an alternative to the rapid playing of Buddy DeFranco) in the 1950s, was always an adventurous player, although his groundings were in bop. This particular album features him with two different pianoless rhythm sections (with Mundell Lowe or Dick Garcia on guitar, Teddy Kotick or Milt Hinton on bass, and Shadow Wilson or Osie Johnson on drums) performing six lyrical ballads (including "Cry Me a River," "Star Dust," and "More Than You Know"), plus two lengthy originals. The latter were freely improvised at the studio, and they are quite unpredictable while being melodic and ultimately logical. An intriguing and well-rounded album, well worth searching for.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:dxfyxqygldhe

Tony Scott
Both Sides of Tony Scott

Tracks

1 Cry Me a River (Hamilton)  3:50
2 My Funny Valentine (Hart, Rodgers)  2:43
3 Stardust (Carmichael, Parish)  3:48
4 More Than You Know (Eliscu, Rose, Youmans)  3:30
5 Everything Happens to Me (Adair, Dennis)  6:01
6 Counterpoint Pleasant (Scott)  7:10
7 East Coast, West Side (Scott)  7:06
8 You and I (Kitchstein)  5:52

*

Personnel
[# 1-4]

Tony Scott - cl
Mundell Lowe - g
Teddy Kotick - b
Shadow Wilson - dr
[# 5-8]

Tony Scott - cl
Dick Garcia - g
Milt Hinton - b
Osie Johnson - dr

Recorded in New York City ; January 25 & 26 [# 5-8], 1956

The Joe Newman Septet The Midgets

Joe Newman, one of the very few musicians (other than Freddie Green) to play for long periods with Count Basie's orchestras of both the 1940s and '50s, had an unclassifiable trumpet style. Influenced early on by Louis Armstrong and more prominently by Harry "Sweets" Edison, Newman was a mainstream player who was versatile enough to hold his own with Count Basie's younger (and generally boppish) sidemen. Born to a musical family in New Orleans, Newman not only played with the college band at Alabama State College, but took over its leadership. He gained important early experience playing with Lionel Hampton's big band (1941-43) before joining Basie (1943-47). He was a featured sideman with Illinois Jacquet's popular group and also worked with J.C. Heard. Newman's second period with Basie (1952-61) gave him his greatest fame, as he shared solo space with Thad Jones. The trumpeter also recorded extensively during this era a leader for Vanguard, Storyville, Jazztone, Savoy, Coral, Roulette, Swingville and Mercury; his four near-classic RCA sessions have been reissued as a two-CD set. After leaving Basie, Newman toured the Soviet Union with Benny Goodman (1962), freelanced around New York, and became involved with Jazz Interactions (a nonprofit organization that educated youth about jazz), serving as its president starting in 1967. In later years, Joe Newman fared well at the 1972 Newport in New York jam sessions, guested with the New York Jazz Repertory Company, toured with Benny Carter, and led sessions for Black & Blue and Concord. He also founded Jazz Interactions, a New York-based organization that educated children about jazz and promoted concerts.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=11:wifwxqy5ldje~T1

The
Joe Newman
Septet
The Midgets

Tracks

1 No Moon at All (Evans, Mann)  2:50
2 Valerie (Wilkins)  2:57
3 My Dog Friday (Wilkins)  3:31
4 Scooter (Wilkins)  2:57
5 The Late Late Show (Berlin, Alfred)  3:01
6 Indeed the Blues (Wilkins)  3:42
7 The Midgets (Newman)  6:09
8 One Lamper (Wilkins)  3:04
9 Living Dangerously (Wilkins)  2:52
10 Really ? Healy ! (Wilkins)  2:52
11 She Has Red Hair (Wilkins)  3:26

*

Personnel
Joe Newman - tp
Frank Wess - fl
Hank Jones - p [and - org on #3]
Barry Galbraith - el. g
Freddie Green - rhyt. g
Eddie Jones - b
Osie Johnson - dr

Recorded at Webster Hall, New York City, July 8, 1956 [# 1-4] ; July 10, 1956 [# 5-7] & July 13, 1956 [#8-11]

Gerry Mulligan Quartet - Complete Studio Recordings

This Lone Hill Jazz compilation brings together the full contents of two separate LPs, The Gerry Mulligan Quartet, recorded for Verve and the Phillips album Spring is Sprung. Both releases have identical personnel, with the baritone saxophonist joined by valve trombonist Bob Brookmeyer, bassist Bill Crow, and drummer Gus Johnson. The first six selections are from the Verve recording. The baritone saxophonist and trombonist are in top form, equally brilliant as soloists and when feeding off one another. Mulligan reworks the often maudlin "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You" into a swinging chart. Mulligan's two originals, "Love in New Orleans" and "I Know, Don't Know How" (the second piece recorded live at the Village Vanguard), stand out. Brookmeyer switches to piano for Mulligan's upbeat blues "Piano Train." The next six tracks are from the latter album. Mulligan's intricate jazz waltz "Four for Three." is an opportunity to show off some fine counterpoint. Brookmeyer plays piano on the Mulligan's loping "Subterranean Blues," while Mulligan takes his place on "Spring Is Sprung," a breezy blues showcasing the valve trombonist at length. Another obvious highlight is Brookmeyer's "Open Country," a piece that turns up on a number of Mulligan's recordings. Finally, the last two bonus tracks are taken from the Pacific Jazz Reunion sessions featuring Mulligan with his earlier quartet partner Chet Baker, though these performances are not as high caliber as the music made by Mulligan and Brookmeyer elsewhere on this CD.
Ken Dryden

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/complete-studio-recordings-gerry-mulligan-quartet-mw0000350885

Gerry Mulligan
Quartet
Complete Studio Recordings 

Tracks

1 I'm Getting Sentimental Over You (Bassman, Washington)  5:05
2 Piano Train (Mulligan)  6:12
3 Lost in the Stars (Weill, Anderson)  5:56
4 I Believe in You (Loesser)  4:38
5 Love in New Orleans (Mulligan)  5:46
6 I Know, Don't Know How (Mulligan)  7:55
7 Jive at Five (Basie, Edison)  6:31
8 Four for Three (Mulligan)  4:02
9 17 Mile Drive (Mulligan)  4:02
10 Subterranean Blues (Mulligan)  9:48
11 Spring Is Sprung (Mulligan)  6:50
12 Open Country (Brookmeyer)  4:36
13 People Will Say We're in Love (Hammersetein, Rodgers)  3:43
14 Gee Baby, Ain't I Good to You (Razzaf, Redman)  3:39 


*


Personnel
[# 1-6]
Bob Brookmeyer - tb & p [# 2]
Gerry Mulligan - bs
Bill Crow - b
Gus Johnson - dr
Recorded in New York ; May 14 & 15, 1962 [# 1-5] ; & at the Village Vanguard, New York ; February 25, 1962 [# 6]
[# 7-12]
Bob Brookmeyer - tb & p [# 10]
Gerry Mulligan - bs & p [# 11]
Bill Crow - b
Dave Bailey - dr
Recorded in New York ; December 11 & 12, 1962
[# 13-14]
Chet Baker - tp
Gerry Mulligan - bs
Henry Grimes - b
Dave Bailey - dr
Recorded in New York ; December 3, 11 & 17, 1957