Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Sunday, August 2, 2015

Music to Listen to Red Norvo By

Although vibraphonist Red Norvo is the leader of this sextet date, clarinetist Bill Smith (who contributed the 20-minute four-movement "Divertimento") often sets the tone for the music. His work has classical elements to it, but the five shorter pieces (by Jack Montrose, Barney Kessel, Lennie Niehaus, Duane Tatro, and Norvo) are much more jazz oriented. Norvo's light-toned sextet (which consists of his vibes, flutist Buddy Collette, clarinetist Bill Smith, guitarist Barney Kessel, bassist Red Mitchell, and drummer Shelly Manne) was not a regularly working unit, but it sounds well-integrated and tight during the complex, but generally swinging, music.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/music-to-listen-to-red-norvo-by-mw0000267694

Red Norvo
Music to Listen to Red Norvo By

Tracks

1 Poeme (Montrose)  5:53
2 Red Sails (Kessel)  3:51
3 The Red Broom (Norvo)  4:37
4 Rubricity (Tatro)  3:54
5 Paying the Dues Blues (Niehaus)  4:53Divertimento (Smith)

 6 1st Movement  4:18
7 2nd Movement  6:42
8 3rd Movement  4:43
9 4th Movement  4:18


*

Personnel
Red Norvo - vb
Buddy Collette - fl
Bill Smith - cl
Barney Kessel - g
Red Mitchell - g
Shelly Manne - dr

Recorded at Contemporary's Studio, Los Angeles ; January 26, February 9 & March 2, 1957

Friday, July 31, 2015

Maria Tipo Plays Mozart & Scarlatti


Maria Tipo was born in Naples. She was taught originally by her mother, Ersilia Cavallo, who was a pupil of Ferruccio Busoni. She went on to study under Alfredo Casella and Guido Agosti.
At only seventeen, she won the Geneva international piano competition. Since then, she has performed widely and made a considerable number of recordings.
Maria Tipo's first appearance in North America in the late 1950s, where she played over 300 concerts, caused her to be nicknamed the "Neapolitan Horowitz". Her first recording, an LP of 12 Scarlatti sonatas, which she recorded in a mere 4 hours in 1955, was hailed by Newsweek magazine as the most spectacular record of the year.
Her recordings of Bach's Goldberg Variations and of sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti have been awarded the "Diapason d’Or". She has also championed the music of Muzio Clementi both in concert and on disc. Her stature has tended to be higher among her fellow-pianists than with the general public. Martha Argerich, in an interview with Rai Radio 3, referred to her as "sensational".
She is a pianist of considerable strength and virtuosity. The critic Piero Rattalino recalls her playing as a teenager: "Her agility was incredible, and her precision greater than the volcanic Martha Argerich". He classes her with the "tradition of Italian interpreters that begins with Toscanini and includes Zecchi, Benedetti Michelangeli, Pollini, Accardo, Muti, Abbado: interpreters who remain masters of their emotions and achieve the effect they want on the public." He concludes : "Maria Tipo is a knight errant, always ready to do battle for her ideal, even when this ideal takes the form of the Devil. [Her] ideal is beauty. There are other ways to make music, but this is certainly not the least of them."
Tipo also is a dedicated teacher, giving master classes at the Gubbio Festival and the Scuola di Musica di Fiesole, and has served as a professor at the Conservatories of Geneva, Bolzano and Florence. Among her students are the pianists Andrea Lucchesini, Pietro De Maria, Fabio Bidini, Angelo Arciglione, Domenico Piccichè, Djordje Milojkovic.

Source : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Tipo

Maria Tipo
Plays
Mozart
Scarlatti

Tracks

Cd. 1

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
(1756-1791)

Piano Concerto n° 21 In C Major, K. 467
1 I. Allegro maestoso  14:28
2 II. Andante  7:28
3 III. Allegro vivace assai  6:41

Piano Concerto No. 25 In C Major, K. 503
4 I. Allegro Maestoso  14:59
5 II. Andante  8:27
6 III. Finale. Allegretto  8:37

*


Cd. 2

Domenico Scarlatti
(1685-1757)

12 Piano Sonatas
1 Sonata in E Major, L. 375, K. 20 (Capriccio)  2:57
2 Sonata in B-Flat Major, L. 396, K. 551  5:17
3 Sonata in G Major, L. 286, K. 427  2:14
4 Sonata in C Major, L. 457, K. 132  7:20
5 Sonata in G Major, L. 288, K. 432  2:10
6 Sonata in D Major, L. 465, K. 96 (La Caccia)  5:01
7 Sonata in B Major, L. 387, K. 14  3:00
8 Sonata in G Major, L. 449, K. 27  3:30
9 Sonata in G Major, L. 487, K. 125  2:30
10 Sonata in E Major, L. 23, K. 380 (Cortège)  6:06
11 Sonata in F Major, L. 474, K. 107  5:26
12 Sonata in C Major, L. 5, K. 406  3:17

*

Maria Tipo - p

Recorded 1955 ?

Alfred Cortot Plays Schumann (Feat. Charles Panzera)

Little can be added at this late date to all the praise deservedly heaped upon Alfred Cortot’s legendary EMI Schumann solo recordings from the 1920s and ’30s. Schumann’s restless ideas positively erupt throughout Cortot’s idiosyncratic yet boundlessly imaginative recreations. The pianist’s bracing tempos never sound too fast for the music, while his tart sonority sets off melodies that soar with assurance. A sense of discovery informs Cortot’s smoldering accents and rolling, tumbling inner voices, plus added octaves that arise from the keyboard’s spooky depths. As always with Cortot, finger slips abound. But who cares. He usually hits the right wrong notes!
Jed Distler

Source : http://www.classicstoday.com/review/review-4611/

Alfred Cortot
Plays
Robert Schumann
(1810-1856)
(Dante - Historic Piano Collection)

Tracks

Cd. 1 

1 Papillons, Op. 2  12:19
Introduction. Moderato (D major) - I. Waltz (D major) - II. Waltz. Prestissimo (E-Flat major) - 
III. Waltz (F-Sharp minor) - IV. Waltz (A major) - V. Polonaise (B-Flat major) - 
VI. Waltz (D minor) - VII. Waltz (F minor). Semplice - VIII. Waltz (C-Sharp minor) - IX. Waltz. Prestissimo (B-Flat minor) - X. Waltz. Vivo (C major) - XI. Polonaise (D major) - XII. Finale (D major)

2 Carnaval, Op. 9  25:47
Scènes mignonnes sur quatre notes
I. Préambule - II. Pierrot - III. Arlequin - IV. Valse noble - V. Eusebius - VI. Florestan - VII. Coquette - VIII. Répliques - Sphinxes - IX. Papillons - X. A.S.C.H. - S.C.H.A (Lettres dansantes) - XI. Chiarina - XII. Chopin - XIII. Estrella - XIV. Reconnaissance - XV. Pantalon et Colombine - XVI. Valse allemande - XVII. Paganini. Intermezzo  - XVIII. Aveu - XIX. Promenade - XX. Pause - XXI. Marche des "Davidsbündler" contre les Philistins

3 Kreisleriana, Op. 16  26:18
(8 fantasies for piano)
I. Aussert bewegt - II. Sehr innig und nicht zu rasch -
III. Sehr aufgeregt - IV. Sehr langsam - V. Sehr lebhaft - VI. Sehr langsam
VII. Sehr rasch - VIII. Schnell und spielend

*

Cd. 2

1 Davidsbündlertänze, Op. 6  22:11
I. Lebhat - II. Innig - III. Mit Humor - IV. Ungeduldig - V. Einfach - VI. Sehr rasch
VII. Nicht schnell -  VIII. Frisch - IX. Lebhaft - X. Lebhaft - XI. Einfach - XII. Mit
Humor - XIII. Wild und lustig - XIV. Zart und singend - XV. Frisch - XVI. Mit
gutem Humor - XVII. Wie aus der Ferne - XVIII. Nicht schnell 

2 Symphonic Etudes, Op. 13  24:20
Tema - Var. I (Etude I - Posthumous var. I - Var. II (Etude II) - Etude III - Var. III (Etude IV) - Var.
 IV (Etude V) - Posthumous var. IV - Var. V (Etude VI) - Var. VI (Etude VII)
Posthumous var.  II & V - Var. VIII (Etude VIII) - Etude IX - Posthumous var.  III
Var. X (Etude X) - Var. XI (Etude XI) - Finale (Etude XII)

3 Dichterliebe, Op. 48  25:01
I. Im wunderschönen Monat Mai. Langsam, zart - II. Aus meinen Tränen sprießen. Nicht schnell
III. Die Rose, die Lilie, die Taube, die Sonne - IV. Wenn ich in deine Augen seh. Langsam
  V. Ich will meine Seele tauchen. Leise - VI. Im Rhein, im heiligen Strome. Ziemlich langsam - VII. Ich grolle nicht. Nicht zu schnell - VIII. Und wüssten's die Blumen - IX. Das ist ein Flöten und Geigen. Nicht zu rasch - X. Hör' ich das Liedchen klingen. Langsam - XI. Ein Jüngling liebt ein Mädchen - XII. Am leuchtenden Sommermorgen. Ziemlich langsam - XIII. Ich hab' im Traum geweinet. Leise - XIV. Allnächtlich im Traume XV. Aus alten Märchen winkt es. Lebendig - XVI. Die alten, bösen Lieder. Ziemlich langsam


*


Alfred Cortot - p
Charles Panzéra - voc [cd. 2, # 3]

Recorded at N° 3 Studio, Abbey Road, London ; July 4, 1935 [Cd. 1, # 1] ; July 5, 1935 [Cd. 1, # 3] ; May 18, 1937 [Cd. 2, # 1] ; Kingsway Hall, London ; June 5, 1928 [Cd. 1, # 2] ; Small Queen's Hall, London ; March 6 & 9, 1929 [# Cd. 2, # 2] ; & in Paris ; June 17 & 18, 1935 [Cd. 2, # 3]

Alfred Cortot Plays Chopin

Alfred Cortot’s Chopin abounds with ecstasy, risk, idiosyncratic rubato, soaring melodic projection, and boundless nuance. A brilliant but erratic technician, Cortot was infamous for wrong notes but less celebrated for how he always nailed the perfect tempo for a particular piece. Like most pianists of his generation, Cortot pulls inner voices out of the woodwork, adds bass octaves at will, and doesn’t always synchronize his hands, yet he employs these devices toward specific coloristic and expressive ends.
EMI’s newly re-released 1991 six-disc Cortot/Chopin anthology stands out for the inclusion of otherwise hard-to-find rarities, such as the pianist’s 1943 French HMV Etudes, Preludes, and Waltzes. Generally these sets are inferior to their better-known 1933/34 counterparts, notwithstanding individual flights of fancy not replicated elsewhere (the Op. 10 n° 2 Etude’s highlighted tenor voice, the Op. 18 Waltz’s dynamic surges).
Cortot’s 1933/34 Etudes are reproduced intact, yet only four selections represent the 1934 Waltzes, together with a handful of Preludes from Cortot’s 1926 cycle and a previously unissued 1928 take of the 12th Prelude. As for other cycles, those in charge rightly opted for Cortot’s 1933 Ballades, 1931 B minor sonata, 1933 B-Flat minor sonata, and 1929 E-Flat Nocturne Op. 9 n° 2 over other Cortot versions, plus the classic, impassioned 1933 recordings of the Tarantella, the Barcarolle, and the F minor Fantasy. But I don’t share annotator Guthrie Luke’s justifications for omitting the 1933 Fantasie-Impromptu. True, it’s not Cortot at his best, but it’s far from his worst.
The thrice-familiar A-Flat Polonaise conveys sweeping élan, albeit without the poise and polish of other 78-era interpretations (Rubinstein, Lhevinne, and Horowitz, for example), but the F minor concerto’s classic stature needs no qualification. And Disc 1 offers a choice selection from Cortot’s acoustic and early electrical Chopin 78s.

*

Charles Levin’s transfers more than hold their own alongside competing restorations by Ward Marston and Seth Winner, although the 1949-51 Nocturnes, C-Sharp minor Prelude Op. 45, and Nouvelles Etudes boast less surface noise and more mid-range emphasis via APR’s late Cortot reissue series. Thanks to Arkivmusic.com’s on-demand reprint program for making this fascinating collection available again.
Jed Distler

Source : http://www.classicstoday.com/review/review-15297/

Alfred Cortot
Plays
Frédéric Chopin
(1810-1849)

Tracks

Cd. 1
[1920-1931] 

1 Berceuse in D-Flat major, Op. 57  4:28
 2 Chant Polonais n° 12 - 'Moja Piesczotka'  3:27
3 Etude in G-Flat Major, Op. 10 n° 5  1:32
4 Etude in G-Flat Major, Op. 25 n° 9  0:58
5 Etude in A Minor, Op. 25 n° 11  3:24
6 Impromptu n° 1 in A-Flat Major Op. 29  3:38
7 Impromptu n° 2 in F-Sharp Major, Op. 36  4:34
8 Etude in A-Flat Major, Op. 25 n° 1  2:03
9 Valse in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 64 n° 2  2:59
10 Berceuse in D-Flat major, Op. 57  4:14
11 Ballade n° 1 in G Minor, Op. 23  8:23
12 Prelude in C major, Op. 28 n° 1. Agitato  0:35
13 Prelude in E minor, Op. 28 n° 4. Largo  1:54
14 Prelude in F-Sharp minor, Op. 28 n° 8. Molto agitato  1:38
15 Prelude in G-Sharp minor, Op. 28 n° 12. Presto  1:04
16 Prelude in A-Flat major, Op. 28 n° 17. Allegretto  2:47
17 Prelude in E-Flat major, Op. 28 n° 19. Vivace  1:08
18 Prelude in D minor, Op. 28 n° 24. Allegro appassionato  2:28

Piano Sonata n° 3 in B Minor, Op. 5
19 I. Allegro maestoso  8:28
20 II. Scherzo (molto vivace)  2:34
21 III. Largo  7:03
22 IV. Finale - Presto, ma non tanto  5:04

*

Cd. 2
[1928-1933]

1 Prelude in G-Sharp Minor, Op. 28 n° 12  1:06
2 Nocturne in E-Flat Major, Op. 9 n° 2  4:14

Piano Sonata n° 2 in B-Flat Minor, Op. 35
3 I. Grave - Doppio movimento  4:52
4. II. Scherzo  4:27
5 III. Marche Funèbre (Lento)  6:25
6 IV. Finale (Presto)  1:25

7 Polonaise n° 6 in A-Flat, Op. 53  6:23

4 Ballades
8 N° 1 in G Minor, Op. 23  8:36
9 N° 2 in F Major, Op. 38  6:46
10 N° 3 in A-Flat Major, Op. 47  6:35
11 N° 4 in F Minor, Op. 52  9:23

12 Fantasie in F Minor, Op. 49  11:29
13 Tarentelle in A-Flat, Op. 43  3:00

*

Cd. 3
[1933-1934]

1 Barcarolle in F-Sharp Major,  Op. 60  7:52

12 Etudes, Op. 10
2 N° 1 in C Major  1:57
3 N° 2 in A Minor  1:22
4 N° 3 in E Major  3:54
5 N° 4 in C-Sharp Minor  2:00
6 N° 5 in G-Flat Major  1:54
7 N° 6 in E-Flat Minor  3:05
8 N° 7 in C Major  1:29
9 N° 8 in F Major  2:20
10 N° 9 in F Minor  2:17
11 N° 10 in A-Flat Major  1:54
12 N° 11 in E-Flat Major  1:47
13 N° 12 in C Minor  2:34

12 Etudes, Op. 25
14 N° 1 in A-Flat Major  2:06
15 N° 2 in F Minor  1:23
16 N° 3 in F Major  1:43
17 N° 4 in A Minor  1:37
18 N° 5 in E Minor  2:43
19 N° 6 in G-Sharp Minor  1:53
20 N° 7 in C-Sharp Minor  4:47
21 N° 8 in D-Flat Major  1:05
22 N° 9 in G-Flat Major  1:00
23 N° 10 in B Minor  3:05
24 N° 11 in A Minor  3:30
25 N° 12 in C Minor  2:39

26 Valse n° 1 in E-Flat, Op. 18  4:31
27 Valse n° 5 in A-Flat, Op. 42  3:38
28 Valse n° 10 in B Minor, Op. 69 n° 2  2:49
29 Valse n° 14 in E Minor, Op. posth.  2:14

*

Cd. 4
[1933-1943]

Piano Concerto n° 2 in F Minor, Op. 2
1 I. Allegro  13:37
2 II. Larghetto  8:50
3 III. Allegro Vivace  8:13

4 Impromptu n° 3 in G-Flat Major, Op. 51  4:22

14 Valses
5 N° 1 in E-Flat Major, Op. 18 'Grande Valse brillante' 4:33
6 N° 2 in A-Flat Major, Op. 34 n° 1 ''Valse brillante'  4:28
7 N° 3 in A Minor, Op. 34 n° 2  4:04
8 N° 4 in F Major, Op. 34 n° 3  2:01
9 N° 5 in A-Flat Major, Grande Valse, Op. 42  3:37
10 N° 6 in D-Flat Major, Op. 64 n° 1  1:29
11 N° 7 in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 64 n° 2  3:01
12 N° 8 in A-Flat Major, Op. 64 n° 3  2:51
13 N° 9 in A-Flat Major, Op. 69 n° 1  3:13
14 N° 10 in B Minor, Op. 69 n° 2  2:50
15 N° 11 in G-Flat Major, Op. 70 n° 1  2:53
16 N° 12 in F Minor, Op. 70 n° 2  2:10
17 N° 13 in D-Flat Major, Op. 70 n° 3  1:51
18 N° 14 in E Minor, Op. posth.  2:36

*

Cd. 5
[1942]

24 Preludes, Op. 28
1 N° 1 in C major, Agitato  2:01
2 N° 2 in A minor, Lento  0:35
3 N° 3 in G major, Vivace  0:59
4 N° 4 in E minor, Largo  1:35
5 N° 5 in D major, Molto allegro  0:35
6 N° 6 in B minor, Lento assai  1:34
7 N° 7 in A major, Andantino  0:35
8 N° 8 in F-sharp minor, Molto agitato  1:41
9 N° 9 in E major, Largo  1:13
10 N° 10 in C-sharp minor, Molto allegro  0:31
11 N° 11 in B major, Vivace  0:35
12 N° 12 in G-sharp minor, Presto  1:10
13 N° 13 in F-sharp major, Lento  2:42
14 N° 14 in E-flat minor, Allegro  0:34
15 N° 15 in D-flat major ('Raindrop Prelude'), Sostenuto  4:35
16 N° 16 in B-flat minor, Presto con fuoco  1:08
17 N° 17 in A-flat major, Allegretto  2:46
18 N° 18 in F minor, Molto allegro  0:51
19 N° 19 in E-flat major, Vivace  1:16
20 N° 20 in C minor, Largo  1:25
21 N° 21 in B-flat major, Cantabile  1:35
22 N° 22 in G minor, Molto agitato  0:44
23 N° 23 in F major, Moderato  0:41
24 N° 24 in D minor, Allegro appassionato  2:24

12 Etudes, Op. 10
25 N° 1 in C Major  2:01
26 N° 2 in A Minor  1:24
27 N° 3 in E Major  3:56
28 N° 4 in C-Sharp Minor  2:04
29 N° 5 in G-Flat Major  1:36
30 N° 6 in E-Flat Minor  2:50
31 N° 7 in C Major  1:32
32 N° 8 in F Major  2:24
33 N° 9 in F Minor  2:07
34 N° 10 in A-Flat Major  1:55
35 N° 11 in E-Flat Major  1:46
36 N° 12 in C Minor  2:39

*

Cd. 6
[1939-1951]

12 Etudes, Op. 25
1 N° 1 in A-Flat Major  2:03
2 N° 2 in F Minor  1:24
3 N° 3 in F Major  1:44
4 N° 4 in A Minor  1:32
5 N° 5 in E Minor  2:46
6 N° 6 in G-Sharp Minor  1:58
7 N° 7 in C-Sharp Minor  4:29
8 N° 8 in D-Flat Major  1:04
9 N° 9 in G-Flat Major  1:00
10 N° 10 in B Minor  3:04
11 N° 11 in A Minor  3:34
12 N° 12 in C Minor  2:43

 13 Chant polonais, Op. 74 n° 1 - Printemps  2:22
14 Chant polonais, Op. 74 n° 2 - L'Anneau  1:59
15 Nocturne n° 4 in F major, Op. 15 n° 1  4:25
16 Nocturne n° 5 in F-Sharp major, Op. 15 n° 2  3:11
17 Nocturne n° 7 in C-Sharp minor, Op. 27 n° 1  4:33
18 Nocturne n° 15 in F minor, Op. 55 n° 2  4:23
19 Nocturne n° 16 in E-Flat major, Op. 55 n° 2  4:24

3 Nouvelle Etudes
20 N° 1 in F minor  1:49
21 N° 2 in D-Flat major  1:39
22 N° 3 in A-Flat major  1:47

23 Prelude Op. 45 in C-Sharp minor  4:01

*

Alfred Cortot - p
[anonymous orchestra], John Barbirolli - cond.

Recorded between January 27, 1920 & October 17, 1951

See the complete artwork

*

Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, are a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838–39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. The autograph manuscript, which Chopin carefully prepared for publication, carries a dedication to the German pianist and composer Joseph Christoph Kessler. The French edition was dedicated to the piano-maker and publisher Camille Pleyel, who had commissioned the work for 2,000 francs (equivalent to nearly $30,000 in present day). The German edition was dedicated to Kessler, who ten years earlier had dedicated his own set of 24 Preludes, Op. 31, to Chopin.
Whereas the term "prelude" had hitherto been used to describe an introductory piece, Chopin's pieces stand as self-contained units, each conveying a specific idea or emotion. He thus imparted new meaning to a genre title that at the time was often associated with improvisatory "preluding". In publishing the 24 preludes together as a single opus, comprising miniatures that could either be used to introduce other music or as self-standing works, Chopin challenged contemporary attitudes regarding the worth of small musical forms. Whereas Bach had arranged his collection of 48 preludes and fugues according to keys separated by rising semitones, Chopin's chosen key sequence is a circle of fifths, with each major key being followed by its relative minor, and so on (i.e. C major, A minor, G major, E minor etc.). Since this sequence of related keys is much closer to common harmonic practice, it is thought that Chopin might have conceived the cycle as a single performance entity for continuous recital. An opposing view is that the set was never intended for continuous performance, and that the individual preludes were indeed conceived as possible introductions for other works. Chopin himself never played more than four of the preludes at any single public performance. Nowadays, the complete set of Op. 28 preludes has become repertory fare, and many concert pianists have recorded the entire set, beginning with Alfred Cortot in 1926.
As with his other works, Chopin did not himself attach names or descriptions to any of the Op. 28 preludes, in contrast to many of Robert Schumann's and Franz Liszt's pieces.

Source : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preludes_%28Chopin%29

Alfred Cortot
Plays
Frédéric Chopin
(1810-1849)

Tracks

Preludes op. 28
1 N° 1 in C major, Agitato  0:39
2 N° 2 in A minor, Lento  2:16
3 N° 3 in G major, Vivace  0:59
4 N° 4 in E minor, Largo  1:48
5 N° 5 in D major, Molto allegro  0:36
6 N° 6 in B minor, Lento assai  1:50
7 N° 7 in A major, Andantino  0:37
8 N° 8 in F-sharp minor, Molto agitato  1:41
9 N° 9 in E major, Largo  1:13
10 N° 10 in C-sharp minor, Molto allegro  0:31
11 N° 11 in B major, Vivace  0:30
12 N° 12 in G-sharp minor, Presto  1:07
13 N° 13 in F-sharp major, Lento  2:33
14 N° 14 in E-flat minor, Allegro   0:32
15 N° 15 in D-flat major ("Raindrop Prelude"), Sostenuto  4:45
16 N° 16 in B-flat minor, Presto con fuoco  1:02
17 N° 17 in A-flat major, Allegretto  2:37
18 N° 18 in F minor, Molto allegro  0:46
19 N° 19 in E-flat major, Vivace  1:15
20 N° 20 in C minor, Largo  1:24
21 N° 21 in B-flat major, Cantabile  1:38
22 N° 22 in G minor, Molto agitato  0:45
23 N° 23 in F major, Moderato  0:42
24 N° 24 in D minor, Allegro appassionato   2:29

25 Prelude in C-Sharp minor, Op. 45  4:06
 26 Berceuse in D-Flat major, Op. 57  4:07

27 Impromptu in A-Flat major, Op. 29  3:42
28 Impromptu in F-Sharp Major, Op. 36  4:52
29 Impromptu in G-Flat Major, Op. 51  4:23 
30 Fantasy-Impromptu in C-Sharp minor, Op. 66  4:31

31 Barcarolle in F-Sharp major, Op. 60  7:52

*

Alfred Cortot - p

Recorded at N° 3 Studio, Abbey Road, London ; July 5, 1933 & June 2, 1934 [# 1-24] ; November 4, 1949 [# 25 & 26] ; & July 5, 1933 [# 27-31]

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Glenn Gould Plays Haydn

As if to prove he had not changed his mind about how the Viennese High Classical repertoire ought to be performed, Glenn Gould returned to Columbia's New York Studios in the early '80s to record Haydn's last six piano sonatas. Gould had, of course, recorded all Mozart's piano sonatas between 1966 and 1974 in performances that, while technically brilliant, were judged interpretively eccentric, and his Haydn recordings here share those qualities.
Naturally, Gould's technique is impeccable: every note in the score is presented cleanly, clearly, and with nary a pitch out of place. But, inevitably, Gould's articulation is questionable. Did Haydn mean for the opening Andante con espressione of the D major Sonata (Hob.XVI: 42) to be played non legato ? Did he intend for the opening Allegro of the E-Flat major Sonata (Hob.XVI: 52) to be played staccato ? Did he mean for the chords in the central Adagio e cantabile of the E-Flat major Sonata (Hob.XVI: 49) to be rolled ? The scores bear no such indications ; as they had been in Gould's Mozart recordings, they are entirely of the pianist's invention.
More troubling, perhaps, are Gould's choices of tempos. Fast movements can be incredibly fast — the Vivace assai that closes the D major Sonata (Hob.XVI: 42) is breathtakingly quick — while slow movements can be amazingly slow — the Andante con espressione that opens the Sonata in C major (Hob.XVI: 48) is gaspingly slow. While not as odd as the tempos of his Mozart recordings where he often took fast movements slowly and slow movements quickly, these alterations seriously distort the shape and structure of the music. While these changes may be entirely acceptable for Gould's fans, for most listeners they may sound willfully strange and as utterly unacceptable in Haydn as they were in Mozart.
Produced in digital by Gould himself, these recordings are absolutely transparent and shockingly immediate. This has the advantage of revealing every nuance of Gould's playing and the disadvantage of exposing every moan and groan of Gould's vocalizing.
James Leonard

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/release/haydn-the-six-last-sonatas-mr0002141539

Glenn Gould
Plays
Joseph Haydn
(1732-1809)

The Six Last Sonatas
Hoboken XVI/N° 42, 48, 49, 50-52

Tracks

Cd. 1

Sonata n° 56, Hoboken XVI/N° 42, in D Major
(circa 1782/84)
1 I. Andante con espressione  8:47
2 II. Vivace assai  2:13

Sonata n° 58, Hoboken XVI/N° 48, in C Major
(circa 1789)
3 I. Andante con espressione  12:54
4 II. Rondo : Presto  3:23

Sonata n° 59, Hoboken XVI/N° 49, in E-Flat Major
(circa 1789/90)
5 I. Allegro  4:46
6 II. Adagio e cantabile  8:48
7 III. Finale : Tempo di Minuet  3:40

*

Cd. 2

Sonata n° 60, Hoboken XVI/N° 50, in C Major
(circa 1794/95 ?)
1 I. Allegro  5:32
2 II. Adagio  5:33
3 III. Allegro molto  2:28

Sonata n° 61, Hoboken XVI/N° 51, in D Major
(circa 1794/95 ?)
4 Andante  3:25
5 II. Finale : Presto  2:22

Sonata n° 62, Hoboken XVI/N° 52, in E-Flat Major
(circa 1794)
6 I. Allegro  5:17
7 II. Adagio  7:34
8 III. Finale : Presto  3:48

*

Glenn Gould - p

Recorded at Columbia 30th Street Studio, New York City ; March 11, 1981 [Cd. 1, # 1 & 2] ; March 12 & May 29, 1981 [Cd. 1, # 3 & 4] ; February 24 & 25, 1981 [Cd. 1, # 4-7] ; October 13 & 14, 1980 [Cd. 2, #1-3] ; October 14, 1980 [Cd. 2, # 4 & 5] ; & February 25 & March 13, 1981 [Cd. 2, # 6-8]

Billy Taylor Meets The Jazz Greats

Creed Taylor was the original jazz producer for the American ABC Paramount label. This EP [Indiana, The Nearness Of You, In A Mellow Tone & Laura (H.M.V. 7EG8350)], taken from an ABC LP, is an attempt at showcasing the individual tasks of the piano, vibes, bass and drums in modern jazz. Pianist Billy Taylor, accompanied by George Duvivier and Percy Brice, plays a breakneck version of Indiana as an example of the post-Bud Powell style, and Taylor, Oscar Pettiford and Kenny Clarke comprise the basic group for the remaining tracks. Pettiford's superb bass playing is heard throughout The Nearness Of You, a dramatic and technical tour-de-force, while Clarke trades solos with guests Gigi Gryce, Tony Scott and Mundell Lowe on Ellington's In A Mellow Tone ; Joe Roland is added to the trio for Laura and contributes a charming slowtempo vibes solo, noteworthy for its restful and melodic outlines. (Gramophone, July 1958)
According to the sleeve front the present EP [If I Love Again, There Will Never Be Another You, But Not For Me, Come Rain Or Come Shine (H.M.V. 7EG8367-11s)] features the saxophone section, although the presence of a clarinet makes this statement incorrect. Four reed instruments are heard solo above a rhythm section led by pianist Billy Taylor. Tony Scott plays clarinet on If I Love Again in his usual enervated manner, producing music which is polite to the point of boredom. Al Cohn puts aside his tenor in favour of a baritone sax for his spirited version of There Will Never Be Another You, played with engaging assertiveness. The greatly underrated Charlie Rouse demonstrates the tenor sax in an excellent interpretation of But Not For Me, while the wistful mood of Come Rain Or Shine is well suited to the melancholy style of Gigi Gryce's sharply-intoned alto. (Gramophone, September 1958)
The third and final volume [Embraceable You & Stella By Starlight (H.M.V. 7EG8382-8s)] in this series showcases the instruments of the brass section. On Embraceable You Jimmy Cleveland again demonstrates his ability to play quavers and semiquavers at medium tempo on the slide trombone ; he seems to be a slave to technique, however, for his jazz ideas are limited. Trumpeter Donald Byrd takes Stella By Starlight first at slow tempo (mediocre) and then at increased speed (better). Apart from the listed rhythm section, a vibraphone makes discreet appearances on Stella By Starlight, played, presumably, by Joe Roland, who was featured on Volume 1 of this series [...]. (Gramophone, October 1958)
A.M. from Gramophone, July, September & October 1958

Sources
http://www.gramophone.net/Issue/Page/July%201958/98/843918/
http://www.gramophone.net/Issue/Page/September%201958/115/860465/
&
http://www.gramophone.net/Issue/Page/October%201958/111/793965/

Billy Taylor
Meets The Jazz Greats
(2 Lps On 1 Cd)

Tracks

1 Indiana (Hanley, McDonald)  2:20
2 Embraceable You (Gershwin, Gershwin)  4:04
3 The Nearness of You (Carmichael, Washington)  4:07
4 In a Mellow Tune (Ellington, Gabler)  2:43
5 If I Love Again (Murray, Oakland)  3:24
6 There'll Never Be Another You (Gordon, Warren)  4:04
7 Laura (Mercer, Raskin)  3:56
8 But Not For Me (Gershwin, Gershwin)  2:41
9 How About You ? (Freed, Lane)  3:20
10 Stella by Starlight (Washington, Young)  3:38
11 Come Rain or Come Shine (Arlen, Mercer)  3:56
12 Show Me (Lerner, Loewe)  4:47
13 I've Grown Accustomed to Her Face (Lerner, Loewe)  3:45
14 With a Little Bit of Luck (Lerner, Loewe)  4:35
15 The Rain in Spain (Lerner, Loewe)  3:05
16 Get Me to the Church on Time (Lerner, Loewe)  4:20
17 Wouldn't It Be Loverly ? (Lerner, Loewe)  5:03
18 I Could Have Danced All Night (Lerner, Loewe)  4:04
19 On the Street Where You Live (Lerner, Loewe)  3:48


*

Personnel [# 1-11] Creed Taylor Presents : Know Your Jazz (ABC-Paramount ABC115)
Billy Taylor - p
Oscar Pettiford - b
Kenny Clarke - dr
+ special guests
Jimmy Cleveland - tb
Donald Byrd - tp
Joe Roland - vb
Al Cohn - bs
Charlie Rouse - ts
Gigi Gryce - as
Tony Scott - cl
Mundell Lowe - g
Recorded in New York ; March 13 & 21, 1956.
[# 12-19] Billy Taylor - My Fair Lady Loves Jazz (ABC-Paramount ABC177)
Ernie Royal - tp
Don Elliott - tp, meloph & bng
Jimmy Cleveland - tb
Jimmy Buffington - fr hrn
Don Butterfield - tb [# 13]
Jay McAllister - tb [# 12, 14-19]
Anthony Ortega - as & ts
Charles Fowlkes - bs [# 13, 14, 17 & 19]
Gerry Mulligan - bs [# 12, 15, 16 & 18]
Al Casamenti - g
Billy Taylor - p
Earl May - b
Ed Thigpen - dr
Recorded in New York ; January 8 [# 13] ; January 22 [# 14, 16 & 18] ; & & 22, 1957 [all others]

________
Recorded at a time when My Fair Lady was a big Broadway hit (but a few years before it became a film), this CD reissue brings back one of the very best jazz interpretations of the classic score. The focus throughout is on the Billy Taylor trio (which included bassist Earl May and drummer Ed Thigpen), but Quincy Jones' arrangements for the seven horns are quite memorable. There is room for short solos from such players as trumpeter Ernie Royal, trombonist Jimmy Cleveland, altoist Anthony Ortega, and baritonist Gerry Mulligan, and their presence clearly inspires pianist Taylor to some of his finest playing. Highly recommended.
Scott Yanow 

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/my-fair-lady-loves-jazz-r148595

The New Earl Hines Trio - 'Fatha'

The first performances of the New Earl Hines Trios in Mach 1964 were a remarkable example of inspired, improvised teamwork. They took place in a series of three concerts at the Little Theatre on Broadway. Though he was introduced to bassist Ahmed Abdul Malik and drummer Oliver Jackson only an hour or so before the first concert, Hines sent a sophisticated New York audience into ecstasies, and drew rave reviews from the press, most notably from such experienced critics as John S. Wilson of the N. Y. "Times" and Whitney Balliett of "The New Yorker" magazine.
The album in your hands was made by the same trio when Hines returned to the city later in the year, and in it he demonstrates once more that his is one of the perennial, self-renewing talents of jazz. A highly individual style, which he created many years before, is the heart of his playing today, but much has been added, so that the Hines of the 1960's is better equipped than ever to express the teeming ideas of his fertile mind...
Stanley Dance (1964), from the original notes (booklet)

The New
Earl Hines
'Fatha'

Tracks

1 Frankie and Johnnie (trad.)  2:25
2 The Girl from Ipanema (Moraes, Gimbel, Jobim)  2:05
3 Believe It Beloved (Whiting, Schwartz, Johnson)  2:21
4 Louise (Robin, Whiting)  2:29
5 St. James Infirmary Blues (Primrose)  3:59
6 Avalon (Jolson, DeSylva, Rose)  2:21
7 Breezin' Along With the Breeze (Gillespie, Simons, Whiting)  3:25
8 Frenesi (Charles, Russell, Dominguez)  2:18
9 Broadway (Woode, McRae, Bird)  2:32
10 Trav'lin All Alone (Johnson)  4:25
11 At Sundown (Donaldson)  2:20
12 Runnin' Wild (Grey, Wood, Gibbs)  2:24

*

Personnel
Earl Hines - p & voc
Ahmed Abdul Malik - b
Oliver Jackson - dr

Recorded in New York City ; [# 1, 2, 6, 7 9 & 10] November 9, 1964 ; & November 10, 1964, other selections

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

John McLaughlin - Electric Guitarist

Electric Guitarist is an album of reconciliation and penance, a series of reunions with several former colleagues from the early jazz-rock days, some of whom had parted on bitter terms with John McLaughlin. But there are no egos out of control here ; everyone has grown up, and partly as a result, there is a high level of musical inspiration devoid of pointless decibel wars. Jerry Goodman and Billy Cobham of the first Mahavishnu Orchestra show up first, then a genial reunion with Carlos Santana, which has some of the old fire. From this point on, the CD undergoes a clever systematic reduction in numbers — first to five players, then four (the great combination of Chick Corea, Stanley Clarke and Jack DeJohnette), then three (a delightfully loose reunion of Lifetimers Tony Williams and Jack Bruce), then two (a fierce duel with Cobham), and finally just McLaughlin himself delivering the benediction on, of all things, "My Foolish Heart." Jazz is the dominant flavor in these fusions, often in a more restrained manner than the early-'70s sessions, and it pointed the way toward a new musical maturity for McLaughlin the electric guitarist.
Richard S. Ginell

Source : http://www.cduniverse.com/productinfo.asp?pid=7611317&style=music&fulldesc=T

John McLaughlin
Electric Guitarist

Tracks

1 New York on My Mind (McLaughlin)  5:45
2 Friendship (McLaughlin)  7:00
3 Every Tear from Every Eye (McLaughlin)  6:50
4 Do You Hear the Voices That You Left Behind ? (McLaughlin)  7:39
5 Are You the One ? Are You the One ? (McLaughlin)  4:41
6 Phenomenon : Compulsion (McLaughlin)  3:21
7 My Foolish Heart (Washington, Young)   3:22

*



Personnel
[# 1]
John McLaughlin - g
Jerry Goodman - vl
Stu Goldberg - elec piano, org & mini-moog synth
Fernando Saunders - b
Billy Cobham - dr
[# 2]
John McLaughlin - g
Carlos Santana - g
Tom Coster - org
Neil Jason - b
Narada Michael Walden - dr
Alyrio Lima - perc
Armando Peraza - cgs
[# 3]
John McLaughlin - g
David Sanborn - as
Patrice Rushen - p
Alphonso Johnson - b
Tony Smith - dr
[# 4]
John McLaughlin - g
Chick Corea - p & mini-moog
Stanley Clarke - b
Jack DeJohnette - dr
[# 5]
John McLaughlin - g
Jack Bruce - b
Tony Williams - dr
[# 6]
John McLaughlin - g
Billy Cobham - dr
[# 7]
John McLaughlin - g


Recorded at Sound Mixer Studios, New York, New York & Devonshire Studios, North Hollywood, California ; January & February 1978

Lee Konitz - Subconscious-Lee

Recorded during the prime of bebop, between 1949 and 1950, Lee Konitz’ Subconscious-Lee seems practically at odds with itself. It lacks the peculiarity and the exuberance that pours from the recordings of Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk, and other post-swing experimentalists. It simultaneously seems old-fashioned and futuristic. Lee Konitz, who developed under the tutelage of pianist and pedagogue Lennie Tristano, was perhaps equally influenced by the technical fireworks of bebop, and Tristano’s firm mindset. Tristano held that the rhythm section occupied a secondary role, and that improvisation should avoid overt sentimentality. Instead, Tristano and his students valued complexity and precision of harmony and rhythm. Their pursuit of pure musical devices, unaccompanied by emotional expression, is clearly evident on Subconscious-Lee, on which a sense of cool and detached concentration encircles the performances. The combination of impressive and inventive playing with a generally uncaring approach can be likened to the grunge rock movement of the late 1990s, when bands like Nirvana appeared to have no interest in winning over an audience, and all the while delivered powerful and deeply moving music. In other words, Konitz, Tristano, and frequent collaborator Warne Marsh, sound too cool for school. Tristano believed that a rhythm section’s role was simply to provide the structure over which the improvisers could drape their melodies. He counseled drummers and bassists not to interact with soloists, and not to take the lead in musical events, such as swells in intensity. For this reason, much of this album, like others by Tristano, Marsh, and Konitz, sounds similar to antiquated practices of the hot jazz era, when the only instrumentalists given license to elaborate were the trumpeter and clarinetist. On the other hand, the rhythmic activity that Konitz and Marsh use to create winding and unpredictable lines sound as if they fit better into jazz from the 21st century. In fact, the contemporary jazz practice of disguising formal structure and steering clear of well-worn harmonic paths may have been in part influenced by this very school of improvisation.
Subconscious-Lee has one foot stubbornly planted in the past, and the other dangling in the capricious future.
Jacob Teichroew

Source : http://jazz.about.com/od/classicalbums/fr/Subconscious-Lee.htm

Lee Konitz
Subconscious-Lee
(Japanese 20 bit K2 super coding)

Tracks

1 Subconscious-Lee (Konitz)  2:49
2 Judy (Tristano)  2:56
3 Progression (Konitz)  2:44
4 Retrospection (Tristano)  3:07
5 Ice Cream Konitz (Konitz)  2:42
6 You Go to My Head (Coots, Gillespie)  2:36
7 Marshmallow (Marsh)  2:55
8 Fishin' Around (Marsh)  3:45
9 Tautology (Konitz)  2:56
10 Sound-Lee (Konitz)  4:08
11 Palo Alto (Konitz)  2:31
12 Rebecca (Konitz)  3:05



*

Personnel
[# 1-4]

Lee Konitz - as
Billy Bauer - g
Lennie Tristano - p
Arnold Fishkin - b
Shelly Manne - dr [# 2 & 3 out]
Recorded January 11, 1949
[# 7 & 8]

Lee Konitz - as
Warne Marsh - ts
Sal Mosca - p
Arnold Fishkin - b
Denzil Best - dr
Recorded June 28, 1949
[# 9 & 10]

Same as above, except
Jeff Morton - dr replaces Denzil Best
Recorded September 27, 1949
[# 5, 6, 11 & 12]

Lee Konitz - as
Billy Bauer - g
Sal Mosca - p [# 6 out]
Arnold Fishkin - b [# 12 out]
Jeff Morton - dr [# 12 out]
Recorded April 7, 1950

Gary McFarland - Point of Departure

A great record — and one that's filled with so many wonderful little moments ! The whole thing's a very cool, very off-beat set of jazz tracks recorded by vibist Gary McFarland, with a group that includes Jimmy Raney on guitar, Richie Kamuca on tenor, and Steve Swallow on bass — a lineup that's as quirky as the sound of the record ! The tunes are quite different than some of Gary's larger arrangements for Verve, but they've definitely got a very similar charm — quite groovy, and a unique blend of bossa influences, west coast jazz, modal rhythms, and other wonderful touches.
© 1996-2013, Dusty Groove, Inc.

Source : http://www.dustygroove.com/item/3719/Gary+McFarland:Point+Of+Departure

Gary McFarland
Point of Departure

Tracks

1 Pecos Pete (McFarland)  4:19
2 Love Theme from David and Lisa (Lawrence)  4:41
3 Sandpiper (McFarland)  7:43
4 Amour Tormentoso (McFarland)  3:29
5 Schlock-House Blues (McFarland)  6:22
6 I Love to Say Her Name (McFarland)  5:17
7 Hello to the Season (McFarland)  7:02

*


Personnel
Gary McFarland - vb
Willie Dennis - tb
Richie Kamuca - tb & ob
Jimmy Raney - g
Steve Swallow - b
Mel Lewis - dr

Recorded September 5 & 6, 1963

Herbie Mann - When Lights Are Low (aka Salute to the Flute)

This Portrait LP (a 1988 reissue of an Epic album titled Salute to the Flute) found flutist Herbie Mann accompanied for the first time by a big band on five of the nine selections. Prior to 1959, virtually all of Mann's recordings were bop-oriented, and this one is no exception. Whether it be "Little Niles," "When Lights Are Low," "Beautiful Love" or even "Old Honky Tonk Piano Roll Blues," Mann proves to be an excellent bop soloist ; other important players on this date include trumpeter Joe Wilder, altoist Anthony Ortega, pianist Hank Jones, guitarist Joe Puma and bassist Oscar Pettiford. This LP will be a difficult one to find.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.cduniverse.com/productinfo.asp?pid=7995087&style=music&fulldesc=T

Herbie Mann
When Lights Are Low
(aka Salute to the Flute)

Tracks

1 When Lights Are Low (Williams)  6:02
2 Little Niles (Weston)  6:10
3 Old Honky Tonk Piano Roll Blues (Mann)  4:42
4 Pretty Baby (Salim)  4:57
5 Beautiful Love (Young, King, Alstyne, Gillespie)  6:30
6 Hip Scotch (Puma)  3:40
7 Song For Ruth (Mann)  4:22
8 Noga's Nuggets (Pettiford)  4:04
9 A Ritual (Mann)  3:47

*


Personnel
[# 1, 5 & 9]
Herbie Mann - fl
Bernie Glow, Joe Wilder, Don Stratton - tp
Urbie Green, Chauncey Welsch - tb
Anthony Ortega - as
Dick Hafer - ts
Sol Schlinger - bs
Joe Puma - g
Hank Jones - p
Oscar Pettiford - b
Gus Johnson - dr
[# 2, 4 & 7]
Herbie Mann - fl
Anthony Ortega, Dave Kurtzer, Dick Hafer - rds
Joe Puma - g
Hank Jones - p
Oscar Pettiford - b
Philly Joe Jones - dr
[# 3, 6 & 8]
Herbie Mann - fl & alt fl
Joe Puma - g
Oscar Pettiford - b
Gus Johnson - dr
Recorded on April 18  & 29, 1957

Stan Getz (Birdland - 1952)

On this splendid live recording from Birdland from the spring and summer of 1952 we find Getz in sparkling form. The mixture is typical of his repertoire of that period — bop originals, bebop variations on well-known tunes ('Long Island Sound' is based on 'Zing Went the Strings of my Heart', for instance), and ballads. His sound and general approach seem anything but cool, on joyful romps through the extended up-tempo tracks ; moreover between Getz and guitarist Jimmy Raney there existed an excellent rapport, and the two men and their instruments blended well together. It is not surprising therefore that Raney, with his own quiet and unhurried approach, was the longest- serving member of the Stan Getz groups of this period. More than an hour of Stan Getz is always welcome. For it to be a live recording from Birdland is an extra bonus.

Source : http://www.freshsoundrecords.com/record.php?record_id=3615

Stan Getz
Quintet
Birdland Sessions - 1952
(Featuring Jimmy Raney)

Tracks

1 Woody'n You (Gillespie)  4:59
2 Yesterdays (Kern, Harbach)  3:56
3 The Song is You (Kern, Hammerstein II)  6:02
4 I Only Have Eyes For You (Warre, Dubin)  3:02
5 Move (Best)  6:16
6 Long Island Sound (Getz)  7:41
7 'Round About Midnight (Monk, Hanighen, William)  3:52
8 Spotlite (Just You Just Me) (Greer, Klages)  6:36
9 Yesterdays (Kern, Hammerstein II)  4:33
10 Potter's Luck (Silver)  5:07
11 I Can't Get Started (Duke, Gershwin)  2:59
12 Parker 51 (Raney)  5:11
13 My Old Flame (Johnston, Coslow)  2:49
14 Move (Best)  5:43
15 I'll Remember April (DePaul, Raye, Johnston)  5:54

*

Personnel
[# 1-5]
Stan Getz - ts
Jimmy Raney - g
Duke Jordan - p
Gene Ramey - b
Phil Brown - dr
Recorded live at Birdland, New York City ; August 9, 1952.
[# 13-15]
Same personnel.
Same place ; August 16, 1952.
[# 10-12]
Stan Getz - ts
Jimmy Raney - g
Horace Silver - p
Charles Mingus - b
Connie Kay - dr
Same place ; April 15, 1952.
[# 6-9]
Stan Getz - ts
Jimmy Raney - g
Duke Jordan - p
Nelson Boyd - b
Phil Brown - dr
Same place ; May 1st, 1952.