Friday, February 13, 2015

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Teddy Charles - On Campus !

This CD brings back a Bethlehem session, a rather unusual Teddy Charles set in that it is very much a jam session. Oddly enough Charles (despite being designated leader) is only on four of the nine numbers. With pianist Dave McKenna, bassist Bill Crow and drummer Ed Shaughnessy forming a swinging rhythm section, Charles is showcased on three numbers ("Yale Blue," "Whiffenpoof song" and "Nigerian Walk"), flutist Sam Most jams "That Old Black Magic," Zoot Sims is featured on two standards, Dave McKenna romps through "Struttin' with Some Barbeque," guitarist Jimmy Raney drops by for "Yesterdays" and the whole group comes together on "Rifftide." Few surprises occur but the obscure straightahead music is enjoyable enough.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/on-campus!-mw0000556588

Teddy Charles
On Campus !
Ivy League Jazz Concert

Tracks

1 Rifftide (Hawkins)  4:54
2 Too Close for Comfort (Block, Weiss)  3:22
3 These Foolish Things (Link, Srarchey, Maschwitz)  4:30
4 Struttin' with Some Barbecue (Armstrong, Raye)  3:50
5 Yesterdays (Kern, Harback)  3:31
6 Yale Blue (Charles)  6:04
7 Whiffenpoof Song (Galloway, Minigerode, Pomeroy)  4:08
8 That Old Black Magic (Arlen, Mercer)  3:44
9 Nigerian Walk (Shaughnessy)  5:34

*

Personnel
[# 1]
Sam Most - as
Zoot Sims - ts
Teddy Charles - vb
Jimmy Raney - g
Dave McKenna - p
Bill Crow - b
Ed Shaughnessy - dr
[# 2 & 3]
Zoot Sims - ts
Dave McKenna - p
Bill Crow - b
Ed Shaughnessy - dr
[# 4]
Same as above, except
Zoot Sims - ts, is omit
[# 5]
Same as above, except
Jimmy Raney - g, is added
[# 6 & 7]
Same as above, except
Teddy Charles - vb, replaces Raney
[# 8]
Same as above, except
Sam Most - fl, replaces Charles
[# 9]
Same as above, except
Teddy Charles - vb, replaces Most

Recorded Live at Yale Unversity, New Haven, Connecticut ; November 21, 1959

See also
http://www.jazzdisco.org/teddy-charles/catalog/#bethlehem-bcp-6044

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Chuck Wayne - String Fever

Although he often paid his bills with non-jazz pursuits, native New Yorker Chuck Wayne was an expressive and talented, if underexposed, bebop guitarist along the lines of Barney Kessel, Tal Farlow, Jimmy Raney, and Johnny Smith. Wayne was never a huge name in the jazz world, but he did cross paths with major jazzmen like Dizzy Gillespie, Zoot Sims, and Woody Herman -- and improvisers who were familiar with his swinging yet lyrical playing (a relatively small group) swore by him. Wayne was capable of playing more than one style of jazz ; he played swing before he played bop, and he could handle Dixieland as well. But bop was his preference, and that's the style that he is best known for in jazz circles.
Wayne was born Charles Jagelka in the Big Apple on February 27, 1923 -- that's the name that appeared on his birth certificate -- but when he pursued a career in music, he realized it would be easier and more convenient to go by Chuck Wayne. The improviser didn't start out as a guitarist ; as a teenager in the late '30s, he played swing on the mandolin. But by the early '40s (when he was hired a sideman by swing pianist Clarence Profit), Wayne had switched to the guitar and made it his primary instrument. After spending some time in the United States Army, Wayne became quite active on midtown Manhattan's legendary 52nd Street scene of the '40s -- and that was where he made the transition from swing to bebop. Wayne, whose early influences included Oscar Moore (of the Nat King Cole Trio) and the seminal Charlie Christian, first heard Charlie Parker around 1944 ; it didn't take him long to take the bebop plunge.
The mid-'40s found Wayne playing with Woody Herman's big band, and 52nd Street was where he played with trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. Wayne (who played the banjo and the balalaika as secondary instruments) was a sideman for pianist George Shearing from 1949-1952, and in the '50s he recorded some LPs for the Progressive label as a leader. But it was also during the '50s that Wayne had a lot of non-jazz activities, which ranged from writing for Broadway to working as a staff musician for CBS-TV to a stint with singer Tony Bennett (who isn't jazz per se but is a fine example of jazz-influenced traditional pop). However, Wayne never gave up bebop, and he recorded a handful of bop-oriented albums in the '60s and '70s (two more decades that found him dividing his time between jazz and non-jazz pursuits). The '80s found Wayne teaching at the Westchester Conservatory of Music in suburban White Plains, NY (just outside of the Big Apple), and he continued to teach and play in the '90s. On July 29, 1997, Wayne passed away at the age of 74.
Alex Henderson

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/artist/chuck-wayne-p9905/biography

Chuck Wayne
String Fever
(1957)

Tracks

1 Lullaby in Rhythm (Goodman, Hirsch, Profit, Samson)  3:07
2 Embraceable You (Gershwin, Gershwin)  4:38
3 Love for Sale (Porter)  5:09
4 Along With Me (Rome)  3:18
5 Carmel (Wayne)  3:16
6 Body and Soul (Eyton, Green, Heyman, Sour)  3:30
7 Snuggled on Your Shoulder (Lombardo, Young)  2:33
8 How About You (Freed, Lane)  3:48
9 Lover Man (Davis, Ramirez, Sherman)  4:24
10 What a Diff'rence a Day Made (Adams, Grever) 3:26
11 Rockabye Bay (Curtis, Wood)  3:27

Arranged a conducted by Chuck Wayne 

*

Personnel
[# 1, 5, 7 & 11]
Chuck Wayne - g
Don Joseph, Tom Allison, Alvin Golbert - tp
Sonny Truitt - tb
Caesar DiMauro, Eddie Wasserman, Sol Schlinger & and Sam Markowitz - ts
Eddie Costa - p & vb
Clyde Lombardi - b
Sonny Igoe or Jimmy Campbell - dr
Recorded at RCA Victor Studio “A”, New York City ; July 22, 1957
[# 3 & 9]
Chuck Wayne - g
Don Joseph - tp
Gene Quill - as
Caesar DiMauro - ts
Clyde Lombardi - b
Sonny Igoe - dr
Recorded same place as above ;  July 23, 1957
[# 2, 4, 6, 8 & 10]
Chuck Wayne - g
Don Joseph - tp
Caesar DiMauro - ts
Eddie Costa - vb & p
Clyde Lombardi - b
Jimmy Campbell - dr
Recorded same place as above ;  July 24, 1957

Saturday, April 12, 2014

Joseph Reinhardt joue... Django

If anyone was born in someone else's shadow it was Joseph Reinhardt (March 1st 1912 - February 7th 1982). Brother to Django Reinhardt he selflessly played a rhythm guitarist's role for his more famous brother, even though he was a great guitarist and composer himself. Joseph could be found accompanying his brother in cafes and in the bal-musette halls on either guitar or banjo and soon progressed to play with Louis Volas's Palm beach Orchestra. By 1933 he was popular and was found playing in various groups playing hot jazz. He even filled in for his brother on several occasions when Django failed to show up. By 1934 he was a full time guitarist in Le Quintette du Hot Club de France alongside his brother. Other roles including being Django's guitar carrier and spare string keeper, this eventually got the better of him and he decided to quit in 1937.
After his departure from the Quintette he worked with Aimé Barelli's big band and Alex Combelle's Jazz de Paris and recorded his first solo recordings with various groups, Gus Viseur "Swing 42", Hubert Rostaing "L'oeil Noir", Alex Combelle "If I had You". In 1943 he formed his own group recording with violinist Claude Laurence (alias Andre Hodeir). In 1947 he was to be found playing electric guitar with Stéphane Grappelli's Hot Four. Django followed his brother in the same year and started playing electric guitar with less positive results. Joseph apparently still lived the nomadic existence of his forebears and enjoyed nature at first hand, he showed this love for nature in various paintings of caravan scenes, campfires, horses etc.. After his brothers death in 1953 Joseph laid down the guitar and did not start playing again until 1957, at this point he attempted to finish Django's unfinished Messe Gitane. In 1958 he appeared in the documentary "Django Reinhardt" which led to his appearance in a short film Paris Blues (1961). At this time he formed his own quintette and recorded two LP's . The 60's was quite an active period for Joseph, recording with his own string quintet and at the "Blue Jazz Museum" with his regular accompanists of the period, Dingo Adel and Jacques Montagne (Hot Club Records - "Live in Paris 1966"). He appeared at several concerts, performed in various Paris nightclubs occasionally with Babik Reinhardt and even visited the UK, playing and recording with Diz Disley. By the 1970's, however, his public performances had reduced although he did appear at the Samois Festival. For almost all his post-Hot Club Quintet work, Joseph Reinhardt used a very odd looking guitar that he made himself which, surprisingly, had a nice acoustic tone although it was frequently amplified. His early solo playing was considerably less flamboyant than Django and he subsequently developed a modern jazz style reminiscent of his brother's '47/48 electric work. He was above all else, a lyrical performer capable of producing some quite haunting compositions.
Nin-Nin died on 24th February, 1982 and was buried beside Django at Samois perhaps, thereby, publicly condemned to remain in the shadow of his illustrious brother for eternity or, perhaps, ensured a posthumous recognition that he otherwise could not have expected.

Source : http://www.hotclub.co.uk/gypsyworld/index.php?title=Joseph_Reinhardt

Joseph Reinhardt
Joue.... Django
1958

Tracks

1 Djangology (Reinhardt) 2:40
2 Manoir de mes Rêves (Reinhardt) 4:58
3 Bric Top (Reinhardt) 2:35
4 Nuages (Reinhardt) 3:53
5 Bric-à-Brac* (J. Reinhardt) 2:47
6 Sweet Sue (Young) 3:19
7 Triste Mélodie (J. Reinhardt) 4:37
8 I Know that You Know (Youmans, Coldwel) 2:51
9 Manouche (J. Reinhardt) 2:42
10 Mon pote le Gitan (Verières, Heral) 2:28
11 Oui, pour vous revoir (J. Reinhardt) 2:32


*

Personnel
[# 1-8] Joseph Reinhardt joue... Django
Joseph Reinhardt - g
Pierre Ramonet - vl
Jean Maille & Paul Mayer - g
Pierre Sim - b
* Savé Englebert-Racine Schumacher - g 
Recorded at Salle Adyar, Paris ; 1958
[# 9-10] Mon Pote le Gitan
Joseph Reinhardt - g
Other unknow
Recorded in 1959
[# 11]
Joseph Reinhardt - g
Stéphane Grappelli - vl
Roger Chaput - g
Emmanuel Soudieux - b
Recorded October 17, 1947

Friday, April 11, 2014

Music to Listen to Red Norvo By

Although vibraphonist Red Norvo is the leader of this sextet date, clarinetist Bill Smith (who contributed the 20-minute four-movement "Divertimento") often sets the tone for the music. His work has classical elements to it, but the five shorter pieces (by Jack Montrose, Barney Kessel, Lennie Niehaus, Duane Tatro, and Norvo) are much more jazz oriented. Norvo's light-toned sextet (which consists of his vibes, flutist Buddy Collette, clarinetist Bill Smith, guitarist Barney Kessel, bassist Red Mitchell, and drummer Shelly Manne) was not a regularly working unit, but it sounds well-integrated and tight during the complex, but generally swinging, music.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/music-to-listen-to-red-norvo-by-mw0000267694

Red Norvo
Music to Listen to Red Norvo By

Tracks

1 Poeme (Montrose)  5:53
2 Red Sails (Kessel)  3:51
3 The Red Broom (Norvo)  4:37
4 Rubricity (Tatro)  3:54
5 Paying the Dues Blues (Niehaus)  4:53Divertimento (Smith)

 6 1st Movement  4:18
7 2nd Movement  6:42
8 3rd Movement  4:43
9 4th Movement  4:18


*

Personnel
Red Norvo - vb
Buddy Collette - fl
Bill Smith - cl
Barney Kessel - g
Red Mitchell - g
Shelly Manne - dr

Recorded at Contemporary's Studio, Los Angeles ; January 26, February 9 & March 2, 1957

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Steve Lacy - The Complete Whitey Mitchell Sessions

Although this compilation was issued in 2004 under soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy's name, the two original records which make up this Lone Hill Jazz CD were separate dates issued under the leadership of bassist Whitey Mitchell (brother of bassist Red Mitchell) and tenor horn player Tom Stewart by ABC-Paramount. The first ten selections come from Mitchell's sessions, with snappy arrangements of standards contributed by Neal Hefti. The sextet also includes Stewart, trumpeter Don Stratton, guitarist Joe Puma, and drummer Osie Johnson. The leader's bass has a prominent role, though there's plenty of solo space for Lacy, Stratton, and Stewart, too. Although Hefti was primarily arranging standards on this date, he leans more toward cool jazz rather than the swing style associated with his writing for Count Basie. Highlights include the breezy "Strike Up the Band" (with a few nice drum breaks by Johnson), the easygoing "I Let a Song Go out of My Heart," and the beautifully voiced "You Stepped Out of a Dream." The Stewart sessions feature three separate dates with slightly different personnel. On the first six tracks, pianist Dave McKenna and drummer Al Levitt join Stewart, Lacy, and Mitchell. Stewart is the dominant soloist (whose instrument could be easily mistaken for a trombone by a novice jazz fan), though Lacy's imaginative flights are remarkable for such a young musician, especially since the soprano sax was not yet popular among up-and-coming jazz artists during the mid-'50s. The songs include a mixture of traditional jazz, standards, and obscure works. The breezy "Rosetta," the little known "My Heart Is a Hobo," and a rather brief "Let's Get Lost" (the latter omitting McKenna and adding Herbie Mann on tenor sax) are among the high points. Due to the rarity of the original LPs, picking up a copy of this CD is a far cheaper alternative, though the sloppy song credits contain several errors and omissions.
Ken Dryden

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/the-complete-whitey-mitchell-sessions-mw0000351851

Steve Lacy
The Complete
Whitey Mitchell Sessions

Tracks

1 It Could Happen To You (VanHeusen, Burke)  3:12
2 Lover Man (Ramirez, Davis, Sherman)  3:09
3 Strike Up the Band (Gershwin, Gershwin)  2:00
4 I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart (Ellington, Redmond, Mills, Nemo)  2:57
5 Once In a While (Edwards, Green)  3:33
6 Young Lesley (Mitchell)  3:41
7 You Stepped Out of a Dream (Brown, Kahn)  3:10
8 Over the Rainbow (Arlen, Harburg)  2:57
9 Perdido (Tizol, Drake, Lengsfelder)  3:11
10 Why Don't You Take Up the Piccolo ? (Mitchell)  3:03
11 Rosetta (Hine, Woode)  3:19
12 Gee, Baby, Ain’t I Good To You (Redman, Razaf)  3:29
13 Out of Nowhere (Heyman, Green)  2:39
14 My Heart Is a Hobo (Burke, VanHeusen)  3:06
15 Fidgety Feet (Gershwin, Gershwin)  3:18
16 Potatoes (Garcia)  3:10
17 Let’s Get Lost (McHugh, Loesser)  2:04
18 Spain (Jones, Kahn)  2:38
19 The Things I Love (Barlow, Harris)  3:45
20 Some of These Days (Brooks)  3:04
21 Give Me The Simple Life (Ruby, Bloom)  3:35
22 Indian Blanket (Puma)  3:55


*

Personnel
[# 1-10]
Don Stratton - tp
Tom Stewart - t hrn
Steve Lacy - ss
Joe Puma - g
Whitey Mitchell - b
Osie Johnson - dr
Neal Hefti - arr
Recorded New York City ; April 13 [# 2, 4, 6 & 7] & 23 [# 1, 3, 5, 8-10], 1956.
[# 11-16]
Tom Stewart - t hrn
Steve Lacy - ss
Dave McKenna - p
Whitey Mitchell - b
Al Levitt - dr
Recorded New York City ; February 1956.
[# 17]
Tom Stewart - t hrn
Steve Lacy - ss
Herbie Mann - a fl & ts
Joe Puma - g
Whitey Mitchell - b
Al Levitt - dr
Recorded New York City ; February 1956.
[# 18-20]
Same as above, except Bill Bradley - dr, replaces Al Levitt
Recorded New York City ; February 1956.
[# 21-22]
Same as # 17, except Herb Wasserman - dr, replaces Al Levitt.
Recorded New York City ; June 13, 1956

Tracks 11-20 - previously issued on Tom Stewart Sextette/Quintet
 (ABC-Paramount ABC-117)


"Lacy went on to influence every soprano player thereafter. His music has always
been very personal and looking for new ways to put things together."
Lee Konitz

See also
http://www.jazzdiscography.com/Leaders/MitchellWhitey-ldr.php 

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Urbie Green Septet & Octet

Urbie Green was one of many jazzmen who rose to prominence out of Woody Herman's band. Not being a big fan of big band myself, I was unfamiliar with Green's work, so purchasing this collection from the Fresh Sound label seemed like a great place to start. This CD collects two 10"s LPs - the Urbie Green Septet on Blue Note and Urbie Green and his Band on Vanguard - and the 12" Bethlehem LP East Coast Jazz (Series 6). All sessions are from 1953-55 and feature top flight musicians including Rudy Braff, Sir Charles Thompson, Al Cohn, Oscar Pettiford and Osie Johnson. However, some of the playing that impressed me the most was by pianist Jimmy Lyon (not to be confused with the alto sax player Jimmy Lyons), whom I had never previously heard. One final point, sometimes these Spanish import label reissues leave much to be desired in terms of liner notes, but these are excellent, with copies of the original artwork and essays from all three sessions. Hopefully this reissue will give Urbie Green some much needed jazz renewal.
Michael B. Richman

Source : http://www.amazon.co.uk/Septet-Octet-Urbie-Green/dp/B000RO9ZN2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1397080812&sr=8-1&keywords=urbie+green+octet

Urbie Green
Septet & Octet

Tracks

1 Incubator (Green)  4:45
2 Skylark (Mercer, Carmichael)  3:21
3 La Salle (Murtaugh)  3:26
4 Dansero (Daniels, Heyman)  3:18
5 Stairway To The Stars (Signorelli, Malneck, Parish)  3:00
6 Johnbo Mambo (Murtaugh)  5:08
7 Lullaby Of Birdland (Shearing)  6:28
8 Old Time Modern (Green)  5:56
9 Med’s Tune (Flory)  5:50
10 I Got It Bad And That Ain’t Good (Ellington)  5:58
11 Sassafras (Evans)  3:56
12 On Green Dolphin Street (Kaper, Washington)  3:32
13 How About You ? (Freed, Lane)  2:47
14 Mutation (Evans)  3:09
15 Undulation (Melody in Bb) (Evans, Green)  2:18
16 Three Little Words (Kalman, Ruby)  4:01
17 Sneaky Pete (Green)  3:53
18 When Your Lover Has Gone (Swan)  3:24
19 Just One Of Those Things (Porter)  4:18

*

Personnel
[# 1-6]
Doug Mettome - tp & br hrn
Urbie Green - tb
John Murtaugh - ts
Sam Staff - bs
Jimmy Lyon - p
Dante Martucci - b
Jimmy Campbell - dr
Recorded in Hackensack, New Jersey ; December 27, 1953
[# 7-10]
Ruby Braff - tp
Urbie Green - tb
Med Flory - as
Frank Wess - fl & ts
Sir Charles Thompson - p
Freddie Green - g
Aaron Bell - b
Bobby Donaldson - dr
Recorded in New York City ; 17, 1954
[# 11-13]
Doug Mettome - tp & mllphn
Urbie Green - tb
Al Cohn - cl & ts
Danny Bank - fl & bs
Jimmy Lyon - p & clst
Oscar Pettiford - b
Jimmy Campbell - dr
Recorded in New York City ; January 15, 1955
[# 14-19]
Doug Mettome - tp
Urbie Green - tb
Al Cohn - ts & b cl
Danny Bank - fl, cl & bs
Jimmy Lyon - p
Oscar Pettiford - b
Osie Johnson - dr
Recorded in New York City ; January 19, 1955

Saturday, April 5, 2014

Earl Hines in Paris - Fine & Dandy

The close of 1949 is a rich era for french jazz lovers. One after the other, Sidney Bechet, Buck Clayton, Louis Armstrong, Willie "The Lion" Smith and Coleman Hawkins tour de France. After years of privacy, ther's lots to be heard again. The one everybody is expecting is obviously Louis Armstrong, who had been in Europe the year before, and whose reputation reaches further than the circle of the happy few. At salle Pleyel, on November 3, the "King of Jazz" plays with the same sextet as the year before, with the exception of Cozy Cole on drums, who replaces Big Sid Catlett. Featured in the All Stars are also Jack Teagarden (tb), Barney Bigard (cl), Arvell Shaw (bass) and Earl Hines (p). Vogue invites the latter to record on the following day, with Barney Bigard and Arvell Shaw. To the quintet is later added Buck Clayton, who was in Paris with his own septet, and Buck's drummer Wallace Bishop, who meets again with his former boss, Earl Hines, whom he had not recorded with the whole quintet : on three tracks Earl Hines is alone, with a trio on three others and with a quartette featuring Bigard on "Tea for Two".
From beginning to end the piansit is at his best. He is 47 and has 26 years of a rich career...
Claude Carrière, from the booklet

Earl Hines
Fine & Dandy

Tracks

1 Snappy Rhythm (Hines)  2:55
2 I Never Dreamt (Hines)  3:01
3 Chicago (Fisher)  3:09
4 Night Life In Pompeii (Hines)  3:06
5 Night Life In Pompeii (Hines)  2:59
6 Japanese Sandman (Whitting)  3:16
7 Rhythm Business (Bigard)  2:52
8 Tea For Two (Youmans)  2:37
9 Air France Stomp (Hines)  2:59
10 Chicken Jump (Air France Stomp II) (Hines)  3:00
11 Honeysuckle Rose (Waller, Razaf)  3:08
12 Honeysuckle Rose (Waller, Razaf)  3:29
13 Fine And Dandy (Swift, Jones)  3:09
14 Sugar (Pinkard)  3:22
15 Boogie Woogie On St Louis Blues (Handy)  3:01
16 Singin' For My French Brother (Waller, Razaf)  2:42


*


Personnel
[# 1, 2, 11 & 13] Earl Hines Trio
Earl Hines - p
Arvell Shaw - b
Wallace Bishop - dr
Recorded in Paris ; November 4, 1949 [# 1-13]
[# 3-10] Earl Hines All Star Quartet
Earl Hines - p
Buck Clayton - tp [except # 8]
Barney Bigard - vl
Arvell Shaw - b
Wallace Bishop - dr
Recorded same place and date as above
[# 14-16] Earl Hines
Earl Hines - p & vc
Recorded in Paris ; November 6, 1949 [# 14-16]

Teddy Wilson - The Complete All-Star Sextette & V-Disc Sessions

Teddy Wilson was the definitive swing pianist, an influential stylist still best known for his association with Benny Goodman ; however, Wilson had a long career after his years with Goodman. This CD mostly features him with his brilliant sextet of 1944-1945 which also includes trumpeter Charlie Shavers and vibraphonist Red Norvo playing concise versions of swing standards. Much of this music had previously been issued but never as complete as on this worthy set. Also here are three Wilson performances from a V-Disc session that features trumpeter Joe Thomas and clarinetist Edmund Hall and two other numbers in which the pianist is backed by a radio orchestra.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/central-avenue-blues-the-complete-all-star-sextette-v-disc-sessions-mw0000275354

Teddy Wilson
Central Avenue Blues
The Complete All-Star Sextette & V-Disc Sessions

Tracks

1 How High the Moon, Pt. 1 [V-Disc version] (Hamilton, Lewis)  4:12
2 Russian Lullaby [incompl. alt. take] (Berlin)  4:33
3 Russian Lullaby [master take] (Berlin)  4:37
4 After You've Gone (Creamer, Layton)  2:45
5 How High the Moon, Pt. 2 (Hamilton, Lewis)  3:14
6 I Surrender, Dear (Barris, Clifford)  2:54
7 Stompin' at the Savoy (Goodman, Razaf, Sampson, Webb)  2:22
8 Whispering (Coburn, Fisher, Rose, Schoenberger)  2:05
9 I Know That You Know (Caldwell, Youmans)  1:49
10 I'm Confessin' (That I Love You) (Daugherty, Neiburg, Reynolds)  2:47
11 Rose Room (Hickman, Williams, Williams)  2:15
12 Body and Soul (Eyton, Green, Heyman, Sour)  2:47
13 China Boy (Boutelje, Winfree)  2:09
14 Talk of the Town (Hynde, Livingston, Neiburg, Symes)  3:15
15 The Sheik of Araby (Smith, Snyder, Wheeler)  2:26
16 Dinah (Akst, Lewis, Young)  2:47
17 Undecided (Robin, Shavers)  2:23
18 Speculation (Norvo, Wilson)  3:05
19 Sweet Georgia Brown (Bernie, Casey, Pinkard)  2:28
20 Flying Home (Goodman, Hampton, Robin, Robin)  2:22
21 Central Avenue Blues (Wilson)  2:38
22 Begin the Beguine (Porter)  3:15
23 The Sheik of Araby (Smith, Snyder, Wheeler)  2:32
24 I Want to Be Happy (Caesar, Youmans)  1:36


*


Personnel
[# 1-3] V-Disc Session
Joe Thomas - tp
Benny Morton - tb
Edmond Hall - cl
Teddy Wilson - p
Johnny Williams - b
Sid Catlett - dr
Recorded in New York City ; August 13, 1943
[# 4-21] The All-Star Sextette
Charlie Shavers - tp
Red Norvo - vb
Teddy Wilson - p
Remo Palmieri - g
Al Hall - b
Specs Powell - dr
Recorded in New York City ; probably November 1944 and/or May 1945
[# 22]
Teddy Wilson - p
Paul Baron Orchestra
Recorded Summer to Fall, 1944
[# 23 & 24] Unidentified broadcast
Teddy Wilson - p
Radio orchestra, probably including Buck Clayton (other speculative personnel listed in text)
Recorded circa '40s

Thursday, April 3, 2014

The Many Sides Of Toshiko

Akiyoshi was born in Liaoyang, Manchuria to Japanese emigrants. She was the youngest of four sisters. In 1945, after World War II, Akiyoshi's family lost its home and returned to Japan, settling in Beppu.
Akiyoshi began to study piano at age seven. When she was 16, she took a job playing with a band in a local club. Beppu was crowded with US soldiers, and musicians were in high demand to provide entertainment. Akiyoshi had planned to attend medical school, but she loved playing piano ; and since she was earning good money, her family did not object to her pursuing music.
A local record collector introduced Akiyoshi to jazz by playing a record of Teddy Wilson playing "Sweet Lorraine". Akiyoshi immediately loved the sound, and began to study jazz. In 1952, during a tour of Japan, pianist Oscar Peterson discovered Akiyoshi playing in a club on the Ginza. Peterson was impressed, and convinced producer Norman Granz to record Akiyoshi. In 1953, under Granz's direction, Akiyoshi recorded her first album with Peterson's rhythm section : Herb Ellis on guitar, Ray Brown on bass, and J. C. Heard on drums. The album was titled Toshiko's Piano, and has been reissued on CD in Japan.
In 1955, Akiyoshi wrote a letter to Lawrence Berk asking him to give her a chance to study at his school, Berklee College of Music. After a year of wrangling with the State Department and Japanese officials, Berk secured permission for Akiyoshi to study in Boston. He offered her a full scholarship, and he mailed her a plane ticket to Boston. In January 1956, Akiyoshi enrolled to become the first Japanese student at Berklee. (As of 2000, roughly 10% of Berklee's student body comprised Japanese students. As of 2012-2013 28% of students are international,a trend started in Akiyoshis time.) While in Boston, Akiyoshi studied with the music teachers Herb Pomeroy, Madame Chaloff, and Richard Bobbitt. The latter taught her about Joseph Schillinger's System of Musical Composition, which influenced her approach to composition. On March 18, 1956, she became known to the entire country as a mystery guest on the popular television game show, What's My Line ?...

Source : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toshiko_Akiyoshi

Toshiko Akiyoshi
The Many Sides
Of Toshiko

Tracks

1 The Man I Love (Gershwin, Gershwin)  5:29
2 After You've Gone (Creamer, Layton)  4:18
3 Minor Mood (Midnight Lament) (Kharab Salim)  3:36
4 We'll Be Together Again (Fischer, Laine)  4:30
5 Studio J (Akiyoshi)  3:16
6 Tosh's Fantasy (Akiyoshi)  9:05
a. Down a Mountain
b. Phrygian Waterfall
c. Running Stream
7 Bags' Groove (Jackson)  6:50
8 Imagination (Akiyoshi)  3:35

*

Personnel
Toshiko Akiyoshi - p
Gene Cherico - b
Jake Hanna - dr

Recorded in New York City ; October 4, 1957

See also
http://www.jazzdisco.org/verve-records/discography-1957/ 

________
...Akiyoshi married saxophonist Charlie Mariano in 1959. The couple had a daughter, Michiru, now a musician who performs as Monday Michiru, in 1963, but divorced in 1967 after forming several bands together. That same year, she met saxophonist Lew Tabackin, whom she married in 1969. Akiyoshi, Tabackin and Michiru moved to Los Angeles in 1972. In March 1973, Akiyoshi and Tabackin formed a 16-piece big band composed of studio musicians. Akiyoshi composed and arranged music for the band, and Tabackin served as the band's featured soloist, on tenor saxophone and flute. The band recorded its first album, Kogun, in 1974. The title, which translates to "one-man army," was inspired by the tale of a Japanese soldier lost for 30 years in the jungle, who believed that World war II was still being fought and thus remained loyal to the Emperor. Kogun was commercially successful in Japan, and the band began to receive critical acclaim. By 1980, the Toshiko Akiyoshi – Lew Tabackin Big Band was considered one of the most important big bands in jazz.
The couple moved to New York City in 1982, where they promptly assembled a new big band (now called the Toshiko Akiyoshi Jazz Orchestra featuring Lew Tabackin). Akiyoshi toured with smaller bands to raise money for her big band. BMG continued to release her big band's recordings in Japan, but remained skeptical about releasing the music in the United States — since the 1950s, big band music has rarely achieved commercial success in the US. While Akiyoshi was able to release several albums in the US featuring her piano in solo and small combo settings, many of her later big band albums were released only in Japan and were available elsewhere only as imports. On Monday, December 29, 2003, her band played its final concert at Birdland in New York City, where it had enjoyed a regular Monday night gig for more than seven years. Akiyoshi explained that she disbanded the ensemble because she was frustrated by her inability to obtain US recording contracts for the big band. She also said that she wanted to concentrate on her piano playing, from which she had been distracted by years of composing and arranging. She has said that although she has rarely recorded as a solo pianist, that is her preferred format. On March 24, 2004, Warner Japan released the final recording of Akiyoshi's big band. Titled Last Live in Blue Note Tokyo, the CD was recorded on November 28 and 29, 2003 but she continues to perform and record as a pianist and occasional guest bandleader.
Akiyoshi lives on Manhattan's Upper West Side with her husband. Besides being musicians, they are both avid wine and cigar collectors.

Source : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toshiko_Akiyoshi

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Sal Salvador - A Tribute To The Greats

The idea for this album came about between Bethlehem and myself around Dec. of 1956. Discussing doing a tribute to prominent jazz artists, I mentioned this to Nat Hentoff and he suggested that as long as there had been so many tributes paid to the early jazz musicians, it might be a good idea to feature the contemporaries. There was immediate agreement on this. I realized that this would be quite a task for just four of us and that the arrangements would have quite a lot to live up to. We thought George Roumanis as the arranger. He had played bass with the group at one time and had recently done quite a lot of writing for us. When he was approached with the idea, his feeling and enthusiasm for it made it a happy thing right from the start. The next decision was a real brainteaster. Who, of the many, many people that had done so much for this music of ours, would we pick ? Which ten ? In order to pay tribute to all the greats that I feel deserve it, I'd have to make quite a number of albums indeed ! The only fair thing to do was to pick them at random and try to complete the series later on. We tried to pick tunes that are associated with the "tributees". These were discussed with everyone involved, record company, arranger the guys in the group and myself. We did not try to copy the original arrangement, but just to retain some of the flavor. Now to present the tune...
Sal Salvador, original liner notes from the booklet

Sal Salvador
A Tribute To The Greats

Tracks

1 Artistry In Rhythm (Kenton)  3:10
2 Taps Miller (Basie, Russell)  4:09
3 Prelude To A Kiss (Ellington)  3:58
4 Walking Shoes (Mulligan)  3:54
5 Solos For Guitar (Roumanis)  3:27
6 Four Brothers (Giuffre, Herman)  3:24
7 In Your Own Sweet Way (Brubeck)  2:59
8 Ruby, My Dear (Monk)  3:25
9 Manteca (Gillespie)  2:55
10 Cool Eyes (Silver)  2:54
11 Yardbird Suite (Parker)  3:57

*

Personnel
Eddie Costa - p & vb
Sal Salvador - g
Sonny Dallas - b
Ronnie Free - dr

Recorded in New York City ; June 3-5, 1957

See also
http://www.jazzdisco.org/bethlehem-records/discography-1957/
&
http://www.jazdiskat.co.uk/57.htm

Shades of Sal Salvador

Wonderful 50s work from guitarist Sal Salvador – a record that features some great work by Phil Woods on alto sax ! Given that Sal often recorded in a small combo mode that usually highlighted his guitar in the lead, the presence of Woods is really a nice surprise here – especially since Phil's at that key early point in his career, when he was playing with a raspy edge that could really add a lot to a session ! The players here shift a bit from track to track – and Woods is on 7 of the album's 11 tracks – joined on some of the best by Eddie Bert on trombone and Eddie Costa on vibes.
© 1996-2014, Dusty Groove, Inc.


Source : http://www.dustygroove.com/item/655995/Sal-Salvador:Shades-Of-Sal-Salvador

Sal Salvador
Shades of Salvador

Tracks

1 Delighted (Salvador)  4:13
2 Two Sleepy People (Carmichael, Loesser)  2:40
3 Joe and Me (Roumanis)  3:31
4 Flamingo (Anderson, Grouya)  3:20
5 Carioca (Eliscu, Kahn, Youmans)  3:37
6 I've Got a Feelin' You're Foolin' (Brown, Freed)  4:30
7 I Hadn't Anyone 'Til You (Noble)  5:01
8 They Say It's Wonderful (Berlin)  3:15
9 I Got It Bad and That Ain't Good (Ellington, Webster)  4:31
10 You're Driving Me Crazy (Donaldson)  4:50
11 Took the Spook (Woods)  4:29


*

Personnel
[# 1, 6 & 11]
Sal Salvador - g
Eddie Bert - tb 
Phil Woods - as
Eddie Costa - vb
John Williams - p
Sonny Dallas - b
Jimmy Campbell - dr
Recorded in New York City ; January, 1957
[# 2-4 & 8]
Sal Salvador - g
Eddie Costa - p
Bill Crow - b
Joe Morello - dr
Recorded in New York City ; October, 1956
Sal Salvador - g
Ralph Martin - p
Dante Martucci - b
Joe Morello - dr
Recorded in New York City ; December, 1956

See also 
http://www.jazzdisco.org/bethlehem-records/discography-1956/

Monday, March 31, 2014

Herbie Harper (BCP-1025)

A fine trombonist active in the West Coast jazz scene of the 1950s, Herbie Harper spent most of his playing time after 1955 as a studio musician, although he occasionally re-emerged in the jazz world. After playing with Charlie Spivak's Orchestra (1944-1947), Harper settled in Los Angeles, where he gigged with Teddy Edwards and had short-time associations with Benny Goodman, Charlie Barnet, and Stan Kenton (1950). In addition to recording in the 1950s with June Christy, Kenton, Maynard Ferguson, Benny Carter, and Barnet, Herbie Harper led five albums of his own during 1954-1957 for Nocturne, Tampa, Bethlehem, and Mode. He mostly worked in the studios afterwards, but emerged to play with Bob Florence's big band and, in the 1980s, he recorded for SeaBreeze and with Bill Perkins for VSOP.

Source : http://discoverbit.com/artist/id:2763557/Herbie_Harper

Herbie Harper
(BCP-1025)

Tracks

1 Anything Goes (Porter)  3:48
2 I'm Old Fashioned (Kern, Mercer)  2:38
3 My Romance (I'll Take Romance) (Rodgers, Hart)  3:51
4 Topsy (Durham, Battle)  3:51
5 How Deep Is The Ocean (Berlin)  3:37
6 Now You Know (Troup)  3:33
7 Angus (Graas)  5:04

*

Personnel
Herbie Harper - tb
Paul Saramento - tub
Charlie Mariano - as
Jimmy Giuffre - ts & bs
Corky Hale - hrp
Jimmy Rowles - p
Harry Babasin - b
Irv Cottler - dr

Recorded in Los Angeles, California ; January 25, 1955

See also
http://www.jazzdisco.org/bethlehem-records/discography-1955/

Sunday, March 30, 2014

Terry Pollard - (BCP-1015)

Terry Pollard was quite active in jazz of the 1950s, although not too much was heard from her in subsequent years. She was part of the very fertile Detroit jazz scene in the late '40s and early '50s, playing piano with many of the major up-and-coming players and recording with Billy Mitchell in 1948. Pollard - who worked with Johnny Hill from 1948-1949, Emmitt Slay from 1950-1952, and regularly with Billy Mitchell from 1952-1953 -- had her greatest visibility from 1953-1957, when she played piano and second vibes with Terry Gibbs' quartet. Pollard recorded with Gibbs and Dick Garcia and was gaining a strong reputation ; in 1957, however, she chose to return to Detroit and raise a family. She recorded with Yusef Lateef from 1958-1959 and Dorothy Ashby in 1961 but eventually slipped away into obscurity, despite her talents. Pollard led just one record date : an album for Bethlehem in 1955. She died in the New York City borough of the Bronx on December 16, 2009 at the age of 78.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/artist/terry-pollard-mn0001439043

Terry Pollard
(BCP-1015)

Tracks

1 Fedi (Pollard)  3:49
2 Autumn Serenade (Rose, Gallop)  6:02
3 Laura (Raskin)  3:56
4 Where or When (Hart, Rodgers)  3:11
5 Scrapple form the Apple (Parker)  5:10
6 Emaline (McHugh, Little)  3:44
7 The More I See You (Warren, Gordon)  4:19
8 Almost Like Being Love (Warren, Gordon)  3:20

*

Personnel
Don Fagerquist - tp
Terry Pollard - p
Howard Roberts - g
Herman Wright - b
Frank DeVito - dr

Recorded in Los Angeles, California ; January 10, 1955

See also
http://www.jazzdisco.org/bethlehem-records/discography-1955/